• Hillary Clinton is unfit for office

    Published: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

      I can no longer tolerate the lies, deceptive assertions and falsehoods by former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton. She must believe the rest of the country knows nothing about the creation and handling of classified documents. Upon the creation of a document or email, the originator has the responsibility to determine if the information being created is or isn’t classified. This is called Original Classification Authority. Failure to properly classify or handle sensitive national security information is a crime. To do so on a continuing basis is inexcusable and prosecutable. This is a former secretary of state who seems to be totally unaware of her responsibilities. She claims the material became

  • Owners should use a leash to walk their dogs

    Published: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

        “Firefighters’ fast work frees puppy from pipe” (News, July 25) tells the story of a puppy being walked that fell into an open pipe and was rescued by firefighters. It says nothing about the irresponsibility of the owners who were walking the dog without the legally required leash. Leash laws are not a suggestion. Anyone with a dog, regardless of size or age, is required to control it, for the safety of the animal and the public. Irresponsible owners always think, “My dog would never hurt anyone” – until it does. This incident wouldn’t have happened if the owners had taken the simple precaution of using a leash. I hope they have learned from this experience the necessity of

  • Oklahoma County public records

    Published: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    Oklahoma County public records for July 31, 2015

  • SPACE

    AP | Published: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    ‘Blue moon’ is Friday, but is it true ‘blue’? WASHINGTON — This is an astronomy story that comes up only once in a blue moon, like on Friday. Maybe. Full moon Friday, will be the second full moon of July. Geoff Chester, of the U.S. Naval Observatory, said the traditional definition of a blue moon is two full moons in a month. It has nothing to do with color. But there’s a catch that may disqualify this second appearance as a blue moon. Chester said an older definition calls a blue moon the fourth full moon in an astronomical season. This is only the second full moon of summer, so by that definition no blue moon. The next blue moon will be in January 2018.

  • Ruth Marcus: Clinton's new email fuss is no scandal

    RUTH MARCUS The Washington Post Writers Group | Published: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    WASHINGTON — The latest controversy over Hillary Clinton's emails — the allegation that classified information was improperly transmitted on her private email server — is, or should be, a non-scandal. Clinton has only herself to blame for a lot of the email mess. She should have behaved like other government officials and used an official account, however cumbersome the multiple device consequences might have been. If she insisted on using a private server, she should have been exceedingly careful to make certain that information was properly designated for archiving at the time — not long after the fact.

  • Long past time to remove ban on U.S. oil exports

    The Oklahoman Editorial | Published: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    SAY this for the Obama administration’s nuclear agreement with Iran, which has received a chilly reception from many in Congress: It has provided momentum to lift this country’s obsolete ban on petroleum exports. During a news conference Wednesday, U.S. House Speaker John Boehner noted that, “If the administration wants to lift the (oil export) ban for Iran, certainly the United States should not be the only country left in the world with such a ban in place.” In Oklahoma, state finance secretary Preston Doerflinger said the proposal to ease sanctions on the sale of oil by Iran is cause for concern, especially because overproduction of foreign oil and this country’s export ban have contributed to declines in

  • Cal Thomas: Debates vs. debates

    Cal Thomas Tribune Content Agency | Published: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    WARWICK, England — When it comes to debates the Oxford Union, which bills itself as the "world's most prestigious debating society," remains the gold standard. Begun in 1823, The Union, in modern times, has hosted debates that have included such luminaries as Ronald Reagan and the Dalai Lama. Oxford Union debates produce useful information. The same cannot be said for U.S. presidential debates. Next week, 10 Republican presidential candidates will gather on a stage in Cleveland, Ohio, behind podiums like "Jeopardy" contestants. With so many candidates having so little time, little useful information will be dispensed.

  • Charles Krauthammer: Among the ruins, a case of righteousness

    CHARLES KRAUTHAMMER The Washington Post Writers Group | Published: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    WASHINGTON — Christianity, whose presence in the Middle East predates Islam's by 600 years, is about to be cleansed from the Middle East. Egyptian Copts may have found some respite under Abdel Fatah al-Sissi, but after their persecution under the previous Muslim Brotherhood government, they know how precarious their existence in 90 percent Muslim Egypt remains. Elsewhere, it's much worse. Twenty-one Copts were beheaded by the Islamic State affiliate in Libya for the crime of being Christian. In those large swaths of Syria and Iraq where the Islamic State rules, the consequences for Christians are terrible — enslavement, exile, torture, massacre, crucifixion.

  • Washington Examiner: With Reid idled, Congress is getting some things done

    Washington Examiner Editorial | Published: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    WHEN voters pulled the lever for Republicans in 2014, they probably didn’t have high expectations for the Congress they were creating. With two years left in President Obama’s term, divided government and further gridlock seemed the best possible outcome. Yet the 114th Congress has been surprisingly productive — and more importantly, it holds forth great promise on such major issues as free trade, criminal justice reform and tax reform. And although not all of the developments are or will be positive, none of the problems stem from the kind of institutional dysfunction that plagued the previous Senate, especially. The classic but misleading metric for a Congress is the number of laws it enacts.

  • Frank Keating: Oklahoma needs to repeal blot in its constitution

    BY FRANK KEATING | Published: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    Three years after Oklahoma became a state in 1907 and elected its first black member of the Legislature, Republican Rep. A.C. Hamlin, his House colleagues conspired to rid themselves of him by proposing and passing a constitutional amendment that insidiously provided that if you or your relatives couldn’t vote in 1866, then you could not vote. Since no black could vote in 1866, then blacks were disenfranchised. Hamlin was defeated. Mercifully, the federal courts intervened and the “grandfather clause” was declared unconstitutional. Talented blacks returned to the Legislature, culminating in the selection of Republican T.W. Shannon as House speaker in 2013. A second suspect minority that came into the sights of our early

  • Long past time to lift ban on U.S. oil exports

    The Oklahoman Editorial | Published: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    SAY this for the Obama administration’s nuclear agreement with Iran, which has received a chilly reception from many in Congress: It has provided momentum to lift this country’s obsolete ban on petroleum exports. During a news conference Wednesday, U.S. House Speaker John Boehner noted that, “If the administration wants to lift the (oil export) ban for Iran, certainly the United States should not be the only country left in the world with such a ban in place.” In Oklahoma, state Finance Secretary Preston Doerflinger said the proposal to ease sanctions on the sale of oil by Iran is cause for concern, especially because overproduction of foreign oil and this country’s export ban have contributed to declines in

  • Oklahoma state briefs

    From Staff Reports | Published: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    Oklahoma state briefs for July 31, 2015

  • U.S. economy has solid 2.3% growth rate in Q2

    By MARTIN CRUTSINGER AP Economics Writer | Updated: 5 hr ago

    WASHINGTON — The U.S. economy posted a solid rebound in the April-June quarter after a harsh winter, led by a surge in consumer spending and a recovery in foreign trade that bode well for the rest of the year. It also ended up squeezing out some growth in the first quarter, reversing an earlier estimate that the economy shrank at the start of the year. The Commerce Department said Thursday that the gross domestic product, the economy’s total output of goods and services, grew at a 2.3 percent annual rate in the second quarter. The government also said GDP in the January-March period grew 0.6 percent instead of shrinking at a 0.2 percent pace. The latest results mirror a familiar pattern over the last few years.

  • Oklahoma City signs ‘domestic draft-and-stash’ pick Huestis

    BY DARNELL MAYBERRY | Updated: 5 hr ago

    Josh Huestis’ journey to the NBA is finally over. The Thunder signed the 2014 first-round draft pick on Thursday, fulfilling its end of a unique commitment the two sides made to each other before last year’s draft. Huestis, the 29th overall pick out of Stanford, raised eyebrows throughout the league when agreed to delay his NBA arrival and spend all of last season competing with the Thunder-owned Oklahoma City Blue of the NBA Development League. It was the first time that a first-round selection agreed to such an arrangement with a team. For Huestis, the deal allowed him to be selected higher than projected and secure a long-term commitment from a franchise.

  • At a glance

    By CHRISTOPHER S. RUGABER AP Economy Writer | Updated: 5 hr ago

    Spending weaker than estimated WASHINGTON  — The U.S. economy grew more slowly over the past three years than the government had previously estimated, held back by more frugal consumers and steeper spending cuts by state and local governments. The economy expanded at just a 2 percent annual rate from 2012 through 2014, down from a previous estimate of 2.3 percent, the Commerce Department said Thursday. Nearly all the weaker-than-expected growth occurred in 2013, when the government now says the economy expanded just 1.5 percent, much less than its previous 2.2 percent estimate. The changes result from Commerce’s annual revisions to its growth data, which are based on updated data from the Census

  • Toyota builds robot helper that can clean, carry for users

    By YURI KAGEYAMA AP Business Writer | Updated: 5 hr ago

    YOKOHAMA, Japan  — Toyota's new robot that glides around like R2-D2 is devoted to a single task: picking things up. HSR, short for "human support robot," comes with a single mechanical arm that can grasp objects of various shapes and sizes and pick up smaller items with a tiny suction cup. It doesn't have other tricks, except for a computer panel on its head for surfing the Internet. A person also can access the robot from another computer and use it like a camera-phone. Kouichi Ikeda, its engineer, is serious about using it to help around homes. First people with disabilities, and then for the elderly in general.

  • Talent, depth make receiver a major asset for OSU

    BY JOHN HELSLEY | Published: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    STILLWATER — Jhajuan Seales leads all Oklahoma State offensive players with 20 career starts. Yet he may not be assured of a starting spot in 2015. That’s not a necessarily a knock on Seales, but an indicator of the Cowboys depth at receiver. Overflowing depth at that, with more candidates than spots on the two-deep, even in four-receiver sets. “There’s competition all across the board,” Seales said in the spring. “Everybody’s pushing everybody. It’s pretty much fun.

  • OSU football rallies around the man they call ‘Pitt’

    BY JENNI CARLSON | Updated: 5 hr ago

    STILLWATER — List the names that have been an important part of Oklahoma State football, and you probably won’t include Jeff Naple. But ask around the program about those who’ve made significant contributions, and you will hear his name. Known to Cowboys far and wide simply as “Pitt”, he’s been part of the football program for nearly three decades. He’s the video coordinator, which means he oversees the recording of games and practices, the breakdown of opponents, and the logging of visual data crucial for coaches to scheme and players to learn. “When you first get here, he’s one of the first guys you meet,” receivers coach Kasey Dunn said Thursday during OSU’s annual preseason

  • Kurt Burris was The Boss

    By BERRY TRAMEL | Updated: 5 hr ago

    Forty-seven years before Oregon placed a huge image of quarterback Joey Harrington on Times Square, 36 years before Brigham Young mailed cardboard ties to entice votes for quarterback Ty Detmer and 13 years before Notre Dame changed the pronunciation of Joe Theismann’s name to rhyme with a certain college football trophy, no less a straight-laced custodian of the game than Bud Wilkinson got in on the Heisman Trophy campaigning. The object of Wilkinson’s stumping was Kurt Burris. Then as now, Burris was a highly-decorated ballplayer who sometimes had to wait on his honors. Some of that changes Monday night, when Burris, who died in 1999, is inducted into the Oklahoma Sports Hall of Fame.

  • Oklahoma briefs

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    AG files charges in fraud case Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt on Thursday filed felony charges against an Oklahoma City man accused of knowingly transferring money that belonged to other people to his personal bank accounts. Olusola Oyegbade, 32, is a former loss mitigation employee of Midland Mortgage in Oklahoma City. Prosecutors claim that on two occasions, Oyegbade directed customers’ payments into his own personal banking account rather than to the mortgage company. Midland reported the alleged behavior to the FBI and has cooperated in the investigation opened by the FBI together with the Public Protection Unit of the attorney general’s office.




Advertisement