Paula Burkes
Business Reporter

A 1981 journalism graduate of Oklahoma State University, Paula Burkes
has more than 30 years experience writing and editing award-winning material for newspapers and healthcare, educational and telecommunications institutions in Tulsa, Oklahoma City and Boston. Since February 2001, she’s worked as a business writer for The Oklahoman state newspaper, specializing in personal finance and workplace enterprise stories that have far-reaching effects for readers’ lives. Paula and her teenage daughter, Jessica, live in Edmond, Okla.


  • Q&A with Jose Olivero

    BY PAULA BURKES | Published: Tue, Mar 29, 2016

    Some Social Security loopholes will be closed April 30, among them a rule that allowed some married couples to receive higher benefits than intended.

  • Mind Your Own Business: Let the April Fools' scheming begin

    Paula Burkes | Updated: Mon, Mar 28, 2016

    Friday is April Fools’ Day so if you plan to prank your coworkers, you best start scheming. If you need some inspiration, here are the top ten gags from a survey CareerBuilder conducted last year: 1. Changed the caller ID on a co-worker's phone to read "Mr. Kitten" every time he called someone. 2. Placed random objects from people's desks in the vending machine. 3. Placed a live goldfish in an IV bag in a clinic. 4. Sneaked onto someone else's computer and sent out an "I love you" e-mail to the entire office. 5. Wallpapered someone's cube with headshots of his co-workers. 6. Convinced a colleague that a co-worker was in love with him.

  • Q&A with Davis Merrey

    BY PAULA BURKES | Published: Mon, Mar 28, 2016

    In a down economy, IT interruptions can be fatal to a business. While violent weather and now earthquakes can cut businesses off from data.

  • Junior Achievement volunteers can make a profound difference

    By Paula Burkes Business Writer pburkes@oklahoman.com | Published: Sun, Mar 27, 2016

    Junior Achievement volunteers don’t realize the ripple effects their efforts may have on students' live, Larry Nichols, executive chairman of Devon Energy Corp., told guests at a Junior Achievement luncheon at the Home Builders Event Center in Oklahoma City.

  • AT&T sales executive called to enhance customer experiences

    By Paula Burkes Business Writer pburkes@oklahoman.com | Published: Sun, Mar 27, 2016

    David Underwood, AT&T’s director of retail sales for Oklahoma, has seen many technological advancements during his nearly 20 years in telecommunications.

  • Business Q&A with Sean Reed

    By Paula Burkes Business Writer pburkes@oklahoman.com | Published: Thu, Mar 24, 2016

    For some senior taxpayers who have turned age 70 1/2, April 1 represents key deadline as they must take minimum distributions (RMDs), required by the Internal Revenue Service of consumers with IRAs and other defined contribution plans such as a 401(k) and 403(b).

  • Q&A with Elizabeth Tyrrell

    BY PAULA BURKES | Published: Wed, Mar 23, 2016

    The Office of Inspector General decides to allow Medicare, Medicaid patients some limited free hospital services.

  • Q&A with Mary Steichen: Many considerations apply when buying long-term care insurance

    By Paula Burkes Business Writer pburkes@oklahoman.com | Published: Tue, Mar 22, 2016

    Mary Steichen, a registered nurse and founder of Insurance Care Associates Inc., talks about long-term care insurance and what coverage means for consumers.

  • Political talk at work can make co-workers see red, feel blue

    By Paula Burkes Business Writer pburkes@oklahoman.com | Published: Tue, Mar 22, 2016

    Forty-four percent of respondents to a recent survey feel talking politics at work keeps them informed, but 56 percent believe such discussions could get heated and offend others. Female workers are particularly wary, with 66 percent of the latter group being women. Is it a good idea to talk politics at work?

  • Q&A with Scott Shuler

    Published: Tue, Mar 22, 2016

    It's a busy time for Norman-based Top of the World, which makes ball caps for retailers nationwide.

  • Mind Your Own Business: Is it smart to talk politics at work?

    Paula Burkes | Updated: Thu, Mar 17, 2016

    Is it smart to talk politics with your coworkers? According to a recent survey by Menlo Park, Calif.-based Accountemps staffing firm, employees are split on the issue. Forty-four percent of respondents feel talking politics at work keeps them informed, but 56 percent believe such discussions could get heated and offend others. Female workers are particularly wary, with 66 percent of the latter group being women. Among younger workers, the divide is even closer, according to the survey, with 52 percent of those ages 18 to 34  favorable to talking politics in the workplace, compared with 48 percent unfavorable. Peggy Klaus, a Berkeley, Calif.

  • Executive Q&A: Dad's incarceration, national title for OU shaped laid-back lawyer

    By Paula Burkes Business Writer pburkes@oklahoman.com | Published: Sun, Mar 20, 2016

    Chris Hammons, a former captain on the OU Sooner's national championship football team, is a managing partner of the Laird Hammons Laird law firm.

  • Q&A with Christina F. Cupp

    BY PAULA BURKES | Published: Thu, Mar 17, 2016

    Oklahoma Daily Business Q&A: Christina F. Cupp

  • Proposed reporting requirements by EEOC to be strain for companies

    By Paula Burkes Business Writer pburkes@oklahoman.com | Published: Wed, Mar 16, 2016

    The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has recently proposed that companies with 100 or more employees be required to include employee pay data along with demographic data on the annual EEO-1 forms. Why would the EEOC want this information?

  • Mind Your Own Business: Employers brace for March Madness tipoff

    Paula Burkes | Updated: Wed, Mar 16, 2016

    If you type “bracket” into your work computer over the next several days -- or into your smart phone, using the company’s wireless network -- you may get shut down or worse, a call from Human Resources. During March Madness, or the annual NCAA Division I basketball tournament, some employers worry about lost productivity from employees who may be analyzing their teams or watching the games on the clock. The American Gaming Association estimates Americans will wager $9.2 billion through office pools, Nevada sports books, illicit offshore sites and illegal bookies.

  • Business Q&A with Jennifer Prout

    By Paula Burkes Business Writer pburkes@oklahoman.com | Published: Tue, Mar 15, 2016

    Wireless technology can help teens avoid distracted driving, stay in touch with parents

  • Executive Q&A: Oklahoma software company exec shows technology can power learning

    By Paula Burkes Business Writer pburkes@oklahoman.com | Updated: Sat, Mar 12, 2016

    Norman-based software company executive Ken Parker, of NextThought education software technology company, shows technology can power learning.

  • Q&A with Rachel Blue

    Published: Tue, Mar 15, 2016

    Business Q&A with Rachel Blue: Plan exit interviews for workers privy to proprietary information.

  • Mind Your Own Business: This St. Pat's Day, be careful of drunk-shopping

    Paula Burkes | Updated: Fri, Mar 11, 2016

    Plan to have a few green beers, or other spirits, to mark St. Paddy’s Day on Thursday? If so, avoid Amazon Prime and other online shopping networks. The average amount we Americans spend in an unplanned booze-filled buying session is $139, according to a recent poll of 3,123 adults by Finder.com personal finance comparison and education site. Shoes and clothes top the list as the most popular drunk-shopping purchase among women, while gambling is the No. 1 splurge for intoxicated men, who spend four times more than women on alcohol-fueled buys; $233 versus $54. Cigarettes, movies and technology are other common drunk-shopping purchases. Meanwhile, Oklahoma ranks No. 6 nationwide for spending on alcohol

  • Q&A with Madalene Witterholt: Employers would be wise to consider Zika virus implications

    BY PAULA BURKES | Published: Thu, Mar 10, 2016

    Madalene A.B. Witterholt, an Oklahoma City attorney, discusses why employers would be wise to consider Zika virus implications.





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