• Norman Music Festival announces dates for April 2016

    By Nathan Poppe Entertainment writer npoppe@oklahoman.com | Published: Wed, Jun 17, 2015

    The Norman Music Alliance announced Norman Music Festival 9 will take place April 21-23 in 2016. The Norman Music Alliance also announced its record-breaking 2015 festival attendance numbers. Roughly 80,000 people enjoyed the festival's three-day stretch in April.

  • DeadCenter Film Festival devotees swarm downtown Oklahoma City

    By Savannah Evanoff and Leilah Naifeh Staff Writers | Published: Sun, Jun 14, 2015

    While the 15th anniversary of deadCenter Film Festival was unabashedly celebrated in downtown Oklahoma City, one thing became clear: This is only the beginning.

  • Ponca City teens embark on cross-country contest

    By Ken Raymond Book Editor kraymond@oklahoman.com | Published: Sun, Jun 14, 2015

    Buckle up, because the Great Race is about to begin. On Saturday, three Ponca City teenagers and an adult driver will start out near St. Louis, Mo., and head toward the Santa Monica Pier in California. Joining them will be a pack of other competitors. But this isn’t a typical race. All the vehicles were created in 1972 or earlier, and none of the drivers have a map to guide them to their destination. Instead, each team will be provided with turn-by-turn directions before setting out each morning. The directions indicate which landmarks to turn at and how fast cars must drive during each segment of the race. Miss a turn, and your team may be out of contention for the $50,000 prize at the end of the road.

  • The Downtown future home of Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center will feature four-story building

    By Steve Lackmeyer, Business Writer | Published: Sun, Jun 14, 2015

    The new Oklahoma Contemporary Arts Center building was designed by architect Rand Elliott.

  • Book review: 'Landslide: LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New America'

    Published: Sat, Jun 13, 2015

    Book review: 'Landslide: LBJ and Ronald Reagan at the Dawn of a New America'

  • White House insiders

    By Ann Greene For The Oklahoman | Published: Sat, Jun 13, 2015

    Book review: “The Residence: Inside the Private World of the White House” by Kate Andersen Brower

  • State hall of fame will add Durant, seven others in 2015

    By Brandy McDonnell Features Writerbmcdonnell@oklahoman.com  | Published: Thu, Jun 11, 2015

    Thunder superstar Kevin Durant, College Football Playoff Executive Director Bill Hancock, Chickasaw painter Mike Larsen, country music manager Jim Halsey, Victoria's Secret CEO Sharen Jester Turney, Inasmuch Foundation Chairman William J. Ross, University of Tulsa President Steadman Upham, and Oklahoma Career Tech system pioneer Francis Tuttle will be enshrined in the Oklahoma Hall of Fame this fall.

  • How to attend deadCenter Film Festival 2015 for free

    By Nathan Poppe Entertainment writernpoppe@oklahoman.com | Published: Thu, Jun 11, 2015

    The deadCenter Film Festival isn't just for filmmakers and indie movie fans with all-access passes. It is also for movie lovers and all families. The festival's screenings officially begin Thursday but here's a look at every free opportunity the festival is offering this weekend.

  • Under investigation

    By Deaven Cavnar Staff Writer dcoggins@oklahoman.com | Updated: Wed, Jun 10, 2015

    Haynes stepped into the police procedural world with this story. The book follows a police team from the suburbs of London who are working on two cases.

  • Oklahoma City teen's symphony comes to life with support from Allied Arts

    By Savannah Evanoff

    Staff Writer

    | Published: Mon, Jun 8, 2015

    Oklahoma City student Anna Jantzen, 16, already has completed her first symphony — one that was performed recently by more than 20 professional musicians in a private setting arranged by the Oklahoma City-based Allied Arts.

  • Oklahoma best-sellers

    Published: Mon, Jun 8, 2015

    Fiction 1. “Alien in My Pocket #5: OHM VS AMP” by Nate Ball (HarperCollins) 2. “Goodnight OKC” by the Junior League (Junior League) 3. “Elvis and the Underdogs” by Jenny Lee (Balzer & Bray) 4. “How I Became a Ghost: A Choctaw Trail of Tears Story” by Tim Tingle (Roadrunner) 5. “Little Oklahoma” illustrated by Helle Urban (Sleeping Bear Press) 6. “One & Only Ivan” by Katherine Applegate (HarperCollins) 7. “Gone Fishing” by Tamera Will Wissinger (Harcourt Brace) 8. “Rock With Wings” by Anne Hillerman (HarperCollins) 9. “Tail Gait: A Mrs. Murphy Mystery” by Rita Mae Brown (Bantam) 10.

  • Authors discover history of slave who survived the Alamo

    By Ken Raymond

    Book Editor

    kraymond@oklahoman.com

    | Updated: Fri, Jun 5, 2015

    Most Americans have a general idea of what happened at the Alamo in 1936. Mexican troops under the command of President Gen. Antonio Lopez de Santa Anna essentially surrounded the Alamo Mission near San Antonio. After a 13-day siege, the Mexican forces overwhelmed their vastly outnumbered counterparts and killed them all. The slaughter became the defining moment of the Texas Revolution, and today we still urge each other to “Remember the Alamo.” But how do we really know what happened there? Largely it was through the testimony of a slave, whose account was reported in newspaper articles and court records. His name was Joe, and until now, not much of his history has been known. Ron J.

  • Under investigation

    By Deaven Cavnar

    Staff Writer

    dcoggins@oklahoman.com

    | Published: Mon, Jun 8, 2015

    “Under a Silent Moon” by Elizabeth Haynes (Harper, 368 pages, in stores) Previous books written by Elizabeth Haynes were romance and psychological suspense novels, but “Under a Silent Moon” is not that kind of book. Instead, Haynes stepped into the police procedural world with this story. The book follows a police team from the suburbs of London who are working on two cases. The first case involves a woman who was found murdered in her cottage. The second case is the reported suicide of a woman whose car was found in a quarry. As the police team gathers evidence and starts to put the pieces together, they discover a link between the cases. Haynes has done her research. She makes the investigation feel authentic.

  • Oklahoma best-sellers

    Published: Sun, Jun 7, 2015

    Best-selling books at locally owned bookstores in the Oklahoma City area.

  • Book review: 'Primates of Park Avenue' by Wednesday Martin

    Published: Sun, Jun 7, 2015

    A look at high societies highs and lows.

  • Oklahoma authors discover history of slave who survived the Alamo

    By Ken Raymond

    Book Editor

    kraymond@oklahoman.com

    | Published: Sun, Jun 7, 2015

    Book offers insights into famous battle.

  • Book signings

    Published: Sun, Jun 7, 2015

    Book signings for OKC metro area.

  • Coppola completes live cinema experiment at OCCC

    By Brandy McDonnell

    Features Writer

    bmcdonnell@oklahoman.com

    | Published: Sun, Jun 7, 2015

    Francis Ford Coppola’s vision for the future of film has become a reality at Oklahoma City Community College. The five-time Oscar winner announced Saturday the successful staging, lensing and screening of “Distant Vision,” a live movie performance piece created in real time. The final live performance of a 52-minute version of Coppola’s semi-autobiographical cinematic story took place Friday night on the 6,000-square-foot soundstage at OCCC’s Visual and Performing Arts Center, and it was screened in theaters as near as Bricktown and far away as Paris, France. “Ultimately, this experiment at OCCC was an attempt for me to try ‘Live Cinema.

  • Francis Ford Coppola completes live cinema experiment at OCCC

    By Brandy McDonnell

    Features Writer

    bmcdonnell@oklahoman.com

    | Published: Sat, Jun 6, 2015

    Francis Ford Coppola, the five-time Oscar winner, announced Saturday the successful staging, lensing and screening of “Distant Vision,” a live 52-minute version of Coppola’s semi-autobiographical cinematic story took place Friday night on the 6,000-square-foot soundstage at Oklahoma City Community College's Visual and Performing Arts Center, and it was screened in theaters as near as Bricktown and far away as Paris, France.

  • Back to its beginnings

    By Brandy McDonnell

    Features Writer 

    bmcdonnell@oklahoman.com

    | Updated: Fri, Jun 5, 2015

    After the parade, spectators thronged across Ron Norick Boulevard to the Cox Convention Center in Oklahoma City, where the three-day Red Earth Native American Cultural Festival was returning after spending last year at Remington Park race track and casino.




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