• Sawyer Sweeten of 'Everybody Loves Raymond' dies at 19

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Sawyer Sweeten, who played one of Ray Romano's twin sons in the CBS comedy "Everybody Loves Raymond," has died. He was 19. Sweeten killed himself, his sister Madylin Sweeten, said in a statement. There were no other details. Madylin, and Sawyer's twin brother Sullivan, all played the children in the sitcom's fictional Barone family. The hit comedy aired for nine seasons before ending in 2005. Sawyer Sweeten was a toddler when the series began. In a statement Madylin, who is four years older than Sawyer, said the family was requesting privacy. "We beg of you to reach out to the ones that you love," she said. "Let them have no doubt of what they mean to you.

  • Seriously silly, Monty Python reunites for a weekend tribute

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Today they reign as elder statesman of cerebral silliness, these alumni of the Monty Python comedy troupe and, some would argue, the funniest men who ever lived. This weekend, the surviving Pythons — John Cleese and fellow Brits Eric Idle, Michael Palin and Terry Jones, plus Yankee interloper Terry Gilliam (the sixth member, Graham Chapman, died in 1989) — reunited in New York for the 2015 Tribeca Film Festival, with a 40th anniversary screening of their masterpiece, "Monty Python and the Holy Grail," and other Pythonalia. During a session with reporters Friday afternoon, the Pythons recalled that, back in 1975, "Holy Grail" opened in New York with free coconuts (which comically figure into the film) pre

  • Report: Dark Knight 3 is in the works from DC Comics

    Matthew Price | Updated: 9 hr ago

    Writer Brian Azzarello is working with writer/artist Frank Miller for a second sequel to the smash-hit Batman tale from the 1980s: The Dark Knight Returns. “For the past six months, I’ve been working with Frank Miller to bring the next chapter in the ‘Dark Knight’ to light,” Azzarello said at C2E2, as quoted by Comic […]

  • Bar owner sentenced to 20 years in country musician's murder

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A Nashville bar owner who shot and killed country musician Wayne Mills has been sentenced to 20 years in prison. Chris Ferrell shot Mills in 2013 after the friends had been drinking at Ferrell's now-closed bar, the Pit and Barrel. Witnesses said the two argued about Mills smoking inside the bar, and Mills threatened to kill Ferrell before Ferrell shot Mills. Ferrell claimed self-defense, but he was convicted of second-degree murder. The Tennessean reports (http://tnne.ws/1HxJqiy) Nashville Criminal Court Judge Steve Dozier said he did not think Ferrell was strongly provoked before the shooting. He cited testimony that Ferrell was 15 to 20 feet away from Mills, who was leaving. Mills was s

  • ‘Cleveland Abduction’: Movie based on Michelle Knight memoir difficult to watch, tough to act

    Updated: 11 hr ago

    Taryn Manning remembers calling her mother to say she was being cast as the star of a new TV movie, a big step for the actress. Her mother was not pleased. “Taryn,” she said. “It’s an awful story.” Indeed it is, in many respects. The movie is “Cleveland Abduction,” based on Michelle Knight’s book about the years of horror that Ariel Castro inflicted on her, Gina DeJesus and Amanda Berry. Premiering on Lifetime at 8 p.m. Saturday, it stars Manning as Knight and Raymond Cruz as Castro. Some viewers may recoil from the movie’s depiction of Castro’s deeds — painful to watch, though Knight’s book portrays even more pervasive and terrible acts. Castro’s torture is both physical and emotional, the lat

  • Ducking the spotlight, some stars decide to skip NFL draft

    Updated: 11 hr ago

    The hat-and-hug routine with the NFL commissioner that has become a rite of passage for many college football stars on draft night is not for everybody. The waiting is the hardest part, even for players good enough to be invited to the draft, and some prefer to do it away from the ever-present eyes of a national television audience. "I know that the draft is really a great event and a great thing to go to," said University of Pittsburgh offensive tackle T.J. Clemmings, a potential first-round pick who declined an invitation to attend the draft in Chicago next week. "It also can be pretty stressful. Nobody knows where they're going to go. But the wait, I'd rather have that wait with my friends and family here at home in New Je

  • Armenians around the world mark 1915 genocide

    Updated: 11 hr ago

    BEIRUT (AP) — Around the world on Friday, tens of thousands of people of Armenian descent commemorated the genocide 100 years ago of 1.5 million Armenians by Ottoman Turks. The annual April 24 commemorations mark the day when the mass killings started. An estimated 1.5 million died in massacres, deportations and forced marches that began in 1915 as Ottoman officials worried that the Christian Armenians would side with Russia, its enemy in World War I. The event is widely viewed by historians as genocide. Turkey denies the deaths constituted genocide, saying the toll has been inflated and that those killed were victims of civil war and unrest. Here is a look at how the killings are being commemorated around the world.

  • Photographer settles lawsuit against Justin Bieber

    Updated: 11 hr ago

    MIAMI (AP) — Pop star Justin Bieber has reached a settlement with a photographer who claimed he was assaulted by the singer's bodyguard outside a South Florida recording studio. Attorney Mark DiCowden confirmed the settlement Friday between his client, photographer Jeffrey Binion, and Bieber. DiCowden said terms of the agreement are confidential. Binion filed the lawsuit in 2013 seeking unspecified damages. The photographer said he was roughed up while shooting pictures from a sidewalk outside the studio. The 21-year-old Bieber has had several run-ins with celebrity photographers, known as "paparazzi.

  • Fox to show Supercross live on its main network

    Updated: 11 hr ago

    Motocross' television coverage roughly 20 years ago typically came a week after the race, unless a local station came out to the track to do a story. About 10 years ago, the sport came a little closer to TV relevance when the races were shown on a one-day delay, then took a huge step in 2013 when competition went on live TV. The evolution of motocross makes a mammoth move Saturday afternoon, when the Supercross race at MetLife Stadium in East Rutherford, New Jersey, will be carried on Fox, the first time the sport will be shown live on a major network. "It's been a long history of us trying to steer the direction of Supercross to get here," said Ken Hudgens, COO of Feld Motor Sports, which operates Supercross.

  • %xhl(Photographer settles lawsuit against Justin Bieber over altercation outside studio

    Updated: 12 hr ago

    MIAMI (AP) — Pop star Justin Bieber has reached a settlement with a photographer who claimed he was assaulted by the singer's bodyguard outside a South Florida recording studio. Attorney Mark DiCowden confirmed the settlement Friday between his client, photographer Jeffrey Binion, and Bieber. DiCowden said terms of the agreement are confidential. Binion filed the lawsuit in 2013 seeking unspecified damages. The photographer said he was roughed up while shooting pictures from a sidewalk outside the studio. The 21-year-old Bieber has had several run-ins with celebrity photographers, known as "paparazzi.

  • Falling prices, rising threats cool interest in Kurdish oil

    Updated: 12 hr ago

    IRBIL, Iraq (AP) — The hall for the Irbil Oil and Gas Exhibition this week was crowded with company displays, executives and investors. But conspicuously absent were international oil giants like Shell, Exxon-Mobil and Chevron that only a year ago were eager to exploit the promising reserves of Iraq's autonomous Kurdish region. The threat of Islamic State group militants, who have swept across much of northern Iraq and are battling Kurdish forces only miles away from the Kurdish capital, Irbil, has dampened international interest. The security threat only increases oil companies' doubts, on top of falling oil prices and disputes between the Kurds and the Iraqi central government in Baghdad.

  • Movie review: 'Ex Machina'

    Updated: 13 hr ago

    The best film of 2015 (so far) hits theaters Friday. “Ex Machina” (pronounced maw-kina) doesn’t differ greatly from a lot of science fiction in its slick look and feel. Its ideas and smart, thrilling approach are what make it extraordinary. Director/writer Alex Garland, who’s responsible for the incendiary scripts of “28 Days Later” and “Sunshine,” crafts the story of Caleb Smith (Domhnall Gleeson, yeah, it’s Brendan’s son), a coder who works at a Google-esque Web company. He wins a competition at work that sends him to a remote lab to work alongside the company’s reclusive CEO, Nathan Bateman (Oscar Isaac), to tinker with “the greatest scientific event in the history of man.” To be accurate, i

  • MLB's pace of play initiatives felt in TV production too

    Updated: 13 hr ago

    When Phil Orlins produced "Sunday Night Baseball," a clock started ticking down in his head the moment the last out ended an inning. Now, a real timer counts down in the ballpark during commercial breaks. The networks televising Major League Baseball games always had to weigh whether they could squeeze in one more replay or anecdote before the next pitch. Starting this season, they must factor in the sport's renewed efforts to speed up play. To the viewer at home, the initial impact is barely perceptible: an announcer wrapping up an inning a bit more succinctly after the third out, or a graphic not shown until a foul ball. Commercial breaks remain the same lengths, but teams now face a deadline for the first pitch of the next

  • Jake Tapper to host Sunday program on CNN

    Updated: 13 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Jake Tapper will take over as host of CNN's Sunday morning public affairs program "State of the Union" in June. The former ABC newsman, who hosts a weekday afternoon program on CNN, replaces Candy Crowley. She left CNN in December and a rotating series of substitutes has been filling in ever since. CNN chief Jeff Zucker on Friday called Tapper a "terrific interviewer who doesn't stop until he gets answers." It's a time of transition for the Sunday shows. CBS' Bob Schieffer just announced his retirement and he'll be replaced by John Dickerson this summer, and Chuck Todd took over last year on NBC's "Meet the Press.

  • 'Little Boy': 3 points for parents

    Shawn O'Neill, Deseret News | Updated: Thu, Apr 23, 2015

    Information for parents about the film "Little Boy."

  • Families stream to battlefields for 100th year of Gallipoli

    Updated: 14 hr ago

    GALLIPOLI, Turkey (AP) — Families of soldiers who served in the Gallipoli campaign of World War I, along with world leaders, streamed onto the battle sites on Friday for ceremonies marking 100 years since the disastrous British-led invasion. Representatives of countries that faced off in one of the most iconic events of the war were honoring the dead in a joint ceremony, on the eve of the centenary since troops landed on beaches here. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan and Britain's Prince Charles each laid wreaths at a memorial for the fallen Turkish soldiers at Gallipoli before listening to a recitation from the Muslim holy book as well as prayers for peace. A band in Ottoman Janissary costume performed old Turkish mi

  • Spike Lee’s ‘Chiraq’ would add to city’s long violent filmography

    Updated: 14 hr ago

    As the camera pans over the Chicago skyline in the opening frames of the 1953 noir “City That Never Sleeps,” a voice-over contemplates the nuances of “this giant, sprawling, sordid and beautiful, poor and magnificent city.” All these decades later, a description that still rings true. The story follows a jaded beat cop who wants out of both the job and his marriage, with an eye on sexier doings with the stripper he keeps on the side. She’s called Angel Face. Of course. “When I first came to this town,” she says, in a slice of delicious noir-speak, “I was gonna be — oh, there were a lot of things I was gonna do. Become famous. But Chicago’s the big melting pot, and I got melted but good.

  • 'Age of Adaline': 3 points for parents

    Shawn O'Neill, Deseret News | Updated: Thu, Apr 23, 2015

    Information for parents about the film "Age of Adaline."

  • Respect for faith sets 'Daredevil' apart

    Jim Bennett, Deseret News | Updated: Wed, Apr 22, 2015

    Hollywood usually employs religion as either a villain or a punchline. But Marvel's "Daredevil" treats faith as a positive part of life.

  • Johnson available for Sunderland after police charge

    Updated: 14 hr ago

    SUNDERLAND, England (AP) — England international Adam Johnson has been called up by Sunderland for a Premier League game, a day after he was charged with three offenses of sexual activity with a 15-year-old girl and one of grooming. Sunderland manager Dick Advocaat says he will make a decision on whether to involve Johnson in Saturday's match against Stoke after talking to the winger. Advocaat says Friday "in principle, if he feels OK, then he will be a member of the (matchday) squad." Johnson was initially suspended by Sunderland after his arrest on March 2, before being reinstated by the club. He was charged by police on Thursday with "meeting a child following sexual grooming" and "three offenses of sexual activity




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