Top Stories


  • US gas prices drop 4 cents to $3.67 a gallon

    Updated: 27 min ago

    CAMARILLO, Calif. (AP) — A survey says the average price of a gallon of regular gasoline in the U.S. has fallen 4 cents over the last three weeks to $3.67. Industry analyst Trilby Lundberg said Sunday that crude oil prices fell over news that Libyan output has risen and Iraq's production was not substantially harmed by recent violence. The survey taken Friday shows the average price for a gallon of midgrade gas was $3.86 and the average price for a gallon of premium was $4.01. Diesel averaged $3.94 a gallon. Of cities surveyed in the continental U.S., Tulsa, Oklahoma, had the lowest average price at $3.35 a gallon. San Francisco had the highest average at $4.12 a gallon. In California, the average price for regu

  • Mayor: Cop killer lay in wait for police to arrive

    Updated: 31 min ago

    JERSEY CITY, N.J. (AP) — A gunman who killed a rookie officer responding to a report of an armed robbery at a drugstore early Sunday never tried to rob the store and instead lay in wait for police, telling a witness to watch the news because he was "going to be famous," authorities said. Lawrence Campbell, 27, shot Officer Melvin Santiago in the head shortly after he and his partner arrived at the 24-hour Walgreens at around 4 a.m., Jersey City Mayor Steven Fulop said. Other officers returned fire at Campbell, killing him. Campbell, of Jersey City, was one of three suspects wanted by police for a prior homicide, Fulop said. Fulop said Campbell was carrying a knife when he walked into Walgreens and asked for directions

  • FBI cyber expert is ex-discount furniture salesman

    Updated: 34 min ago

    PITTSBURGH (AP) — A former discount furniture salesman is now an FBI cyber expert who has been credited with taking down some of the world's leading hackers. Supervisory Special Agent J. Keith Mularski joined the FBI in 1998 and the Pittsburgh office's cyber squad in 2005. In May, he helped prosecutors charge five Chinese Army intelligence officers with stealing trade secrets from companies like U.S. Steel and Westinghouse. A month later, a Russian man was charged with leading a worldwide identity theft ring that infected 350,000 computers and used the stolen information to steal $100 million. He made his reputation by infiltrating a forum that allowed crooks to buy and sell stolen credit card information.

  • 'Planet of the Apes' thumps chest with $73M debut

    Updated: 34 min ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — The monkey business is a good business to be in at the box office. "Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" roared to $73 million on its opening weekend, one of the summer's best debuts, according to studio estimates Sunday. The 20th Century Fox sequel easily surpassed the $54.8 million opening to 2011's "Rise of the Planet of the Apes," the reboot of the fabled chimp franchise. In a summer heavy on hype but thin on quality, "Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" has proven to be one of the few hits that combined both spectacle and substance. Directed by Matt Reeves ("Cloverfield"), the 3-D "Dawn" has drawn enthusiasm from critics and moviegoers alike, particularly for the motion-capture performance by Andy Serkis as the

  • Engineering company Aecom to buy URS for $4B

    Updated: 37 min ago

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Engineering design company Aecom Technology Corp. says it is buying URS Corp. for $4 billion in cash and stock, or about $56.31 per URS share. The price is 8 percent above URS's closing stock price Friday. The California-based companies said Sunday the combination was necessary to building an integrated infrastructure services company that can operate globally and provide services including design, financing, construction and operation of buildings. The companies had worked together on projects such as the Barclays Center in Brooklyn and the World Trade Center in New York. The offer includes $33 per share in cash and 0.734 Aecom shares for every URS share.

  • Yemen's president fires 2 senior army commanders

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    SANAA, Yemen (AP) — Yemen's president has fired two senior army commanders after last week's capture of a city by Shiite Hawthi rebels, state television reported. The TV report said President Abed Rabo Mansour Hadi issued decrees removing Maj. Gen. Mohammed al-Someli and Maj. Gen. Mohammed Ali al-Maqdishi. The report late Saturday gave no reason for their removal. However, it comes after Shiite Hawthi rebels took the northeastern city of Amran last week. They had been fighting against conservative Sunnis from one of the country's largest tribes backed by a local army unit. The United Nations Security Council on Friday demanded the immediate withdrawal of the rebels and all other armed groups involved in the fighting.

  • Public, industry weigh in on oil train safety

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration is drafting regulations to improve the safety of rail shipments of crude oil following a series derailments, explosions and fires. With billions of dollars at stake, the railroad, oil, ethanol and chemical industries have been trying to shape the rules to their advantage in a series of meetings with the White House and PHMSA. A key issue is tougher standards for tank cars used to ship oil. The public has weighed in primarily through letters, emails and phone calls to the agency. Some comments: "Our work on this rule is a work that is organized around what is the safest approach to the movement of this crude oil, particularly given the volumes in wh

  • INFLUENCE GAME: Shaping rail safety rules

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A string of fiery train derailments across the country has triggered a high-stakes but behind-the-scenes campaign to shape how the government responds to calls for tighter safety rules. Billions of dollars are riding on how these rules are written. Lobbyists from the railroads, tank car manufacturers and the oil, ethanol and chemical industries have met more than a dozen times since mid-May with officials at the White House and the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration. Their message: Don't make us pay for increased safety — that's another industry's problem.

  • Expert: Pa. didn't address fracking health impacts

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    PITTSBURGH (AP) — Pennsylvania's former health secretary says the state has failed to seriously study the potential health impacts of one of the nation's biggest natural gas drilling booms. Dr. Eli Avila also says the state's current strategy is a disservice to people and even to the industry itself because health officials need to be proactive in protecting the public. "The lack of any action speaks volumes," said Avila, who is now the public health commissioner for Orange County, New York. "Don't BS the public. Their health comes first." Avila told The Associated Press that he believes senior political advisers did a "disservice" to Republican Gov. Tom Corbett by putting a study of health effects on the back burner

  • Truckers at 2 Calif. ports OK cooling off period

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Truck drivers at the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach agreed Saturday to a cooling-off period following five days of striking that briefly shut the massive ports. Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti said he requested the cooling-off period, and the truckers agreed Saturday to pull down pickets while the city's harbor commission investigates their allegations of poor working conditions and unfair labor practices. "The city will facilitate a dialogue among the parties in the weeks ahead," he said in a statement.

  • Tracy Morgan released from rehab month after crash

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Former "Saturday Night Live" star Tracy Morgan has been released from a rehabilitation facility as he heals from serious injuries he suffered in a car crash that left a fellow comedian dead, his spokesman said Saturday. Morgan will continue his recovery at home with an "aggressive outpatient program," spokesman Lewis Kay said. The former "30 Rock" star suffered a broken leg and broken ribs when the limousine van he was riding in was hit from behind June 7 by a Wal-Mart truck on the New Jersey Turnpike. The wreck killed 62-year-old comedian James McNair, who went by the name Jimmy Mack. Comedian Ardley Fuqua and another passenger, Jeffrey Millea, were injured.

  • Near spill, reservation wrestles with oil's impact

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    MANDAREE, N.D. (AP) — Many Native Americans on Fort Berthold Indian Reservation are trying to manage the balance between the potential prosperity oil and gas development can bring and preserving a land their cultural and religious beliefs say is sacred. That dilemma has been highlighted since a pipeline spewed 1 million gallons of saltwater — byproducts of oil and gas production — into the badlands this month near the reservation town of Mandaree. Ruth Anna Buffalo compares the impact of oil and gas to the building of a dam that flooded her relatives' homes in the 1950s. Leaders of the Mandan, Hidatsa and Arikara nation say oil development has rescued the reservation from poverty.

  • Spokesman: Actor-comedian Tracy Morgan released from rehab facility month after serious crash

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Spokesman: Actor-comedian Tracy Morgan released from rehab facility month after serious crash.

  • 3 remain hospitalized after Grand Teton bus crash

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    GRAND TETON NATIONAL PARK, Wyo. (AP) — Three people injured when a tourist bus flipped on its side while traveling through Grand Teton National Park remained in the hospital Saturday. Two people were being treated at the Eastern Idaho Medical Center in Idaho Falls, Idaho, where they were listed in fair condition Saturday, hospital spokesman Karen Connelly said. Another person remained at St. John's Medical Center in Jackson, Wyoming, in good condition, Connelly said. "Luckily, clinically they're all going to be OK," she said. The bus was carrying 26 tourists and a driver when the accident occurred about 4:10 p.m. Thursday. The bus was traveling on U.S. 89 to Yellowstone National Park.

  • Aronia berry gaining market foothold in US

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    MISSOURI VALLEY, Iowa (AP) — A new fruit that research says packs more antioxidants than popular "superfoods" like blueberries, acai berries and goji berries is establishing itself in the aisles of mainstream grocery stores, showing up in everything from juices to powdered supplements to baby food. Its rise from being a novelty item at farmers markets into a multimillion-dollar U.S. industry even includes a name change, from the common chokeberry — so named centuries ago by European settlers who found the tart, astringent berry more pretty than palatable — to the aronia berry, derived from its genus, Aronia melanocarpa.

  • Owners of Trump Plaza casino expect it will close

    Yesterday

    ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — Atlantic City's crumbling casino market disintegrated even further Saturday as the owners of the Trump Plaza casino said they expect to shut down in mid-September. Trump Entertainment Resorts told The Associated Press that no final decision has been made on the Boardwalk casino. But the company said it expects the casino to close its doors Sept. 16. Notices warning employees of the expected closing will go out to the casino's 1,000-plus employees Monday. If Trump Plaza closes, Atlantic City could lose a third of its casinos and a quarter of its casino workforce in less than nine months. The Atlantic Club closed in January, the Showboat is closing next month and Revel might do likewise if a b

  • Workers struggle in Hamptons, playground for rich

    Yesterday

    SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (AP) — This is a town where people are so rich that a $2 million home can be a handyman's special. A town where the thrift shop is stocked with donations of designer dresses and handbags. But Southampton, with its privet hedges, pristine beaches and some estates costing tens of millions, also is where 40 percent of children get free or reduced school lunches, where a food pantry serves up to 400 clients a month and where some doctors and nurses share homes owned by the local hospital because they can't afford to buy or rent.

  • Chesapeake school to use wind power

    Yesterday

    CHESAPEAKE, Va. (AP) — It'll be slightly taller than the High-Rise Bridge and Mount Trashmore. A wind turbine will rise near the towering trees and open land around Grassfield High School in the western part of the city. School division officials hope to have the turbine running by the end of July near the school athletic complex. They anticipate that it will help power the concession area at the football stadium and reduce the division's energy bill. They also see the turbine as a valuable way for students to study the fast-growing fields of science, technology, engineering and math. Grassfield is home to a STEM academy.

  • Drive-ins use creativity to afford digital switch

    Yesterday

    SACO, Maine (AP) — Many in the movie industry feared the need to convert to digital could be the death knell for drive-ins, but drive-in operators are finding creative ways to afford the switch. Drive-in movie theater operators say more than 200 of the remaining 348 drive-ins in the country have made the expensive conversion from film to digital, which typically costs more than $70,000. Theater owners say conversions escalated quickly in 2013 and will help keep the drive-ins in business for now, promising news for an industry that peaked in the 1950s and '60s, then with more than 4,000 drive-in theaters nationwide.

  • Deadline looms in Newark airport wage hike flap

    Yesterday

    NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — The dispute over workers' wages at Newark Liberty International Airport could be nearing a resolution. United Airlines has criticized the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey for ordering wage hikes. The Port Authority announced in January that it would impose a $1-per-hour wage increase for workers, such as baggage handlers and cabin cleaners, who make less than $9 an hour. They would make $10.10 hourly beginning next February. In an email Friday, United reiterated its position that the increases should be imposed by state legislatures and not by the Port Authority, which operates the airport. But United also said its vendors are bound to abide by local rules.