• Arizona Legislature passes $9.6 billion budget

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    PHOENIX (AP) — The Arizona Legislature has passed a $9.6 billion budget after debating a package that left out a health insurance program for children of the working poor that supportive Republicans failed to include in the proposal. Lawmakers debated until nearly 2 a.m. Wednesday morning before enacting a spending package for the state budget year beginning July 1. After a week spent wrangling over additional funding for K-12 schools that wasn't in the initial budget agreement, lawmakers included a small increase for several school line items. Democrats unsuccessfully sought to restore a health insurance program for children from families of the working poor that was closed to enrollment in 2010 amid a state funding

  • The Latest: Paris police, protesters scuffle over migrants

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    BRUSSELS (AP) — The Latest on Europe's response to the wave of migration from the Middle East and elsewhere (all times local): 11:00 a.m. Protesters have scuffled with police trying to evacuate migrants camped out in an empty Paris high school. Nearly 300 migrants from Sudan, Eritrea and a few from Syria had been living in the school in recent weeks, according to Paris police chief Michel Cadot. City authorities ordered it evacuated, and police arrived around dawn to clear them out. Cadot told reporters that police used tear gas to clear protesters who had blocked the entrance to the Jean Jaures school in northeast Paris. Some masked protesters threw projectiles. The demonstrators included members of a nat

  • Independent Algerian paper faces closure threat

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    ALGIERS, Algeria (AP) — Independent Algerian newspaper El Khabar is facing likely closure after the government cracked down on its ad revenue and challenged its pending sale in court. The newspaper has been critical of the government, notably its handling of the gas-dependent economy. The advertising agency for state companies banned ads in El Khabar in 2014, at the request of the communications minister. Ads by state-run companies make up the vast majority of Algerian ad revenues. The paper's income plunged, so it sold a majority stake to food industry magnate Issad Rebrab. The Communications Ministry alleged the deal was illegal for technical reasons, and an Algiers commercial court is expected to rule Wednesday on

  • The Latest: Arizona House passes $9.6 billion budget

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    PHOENIX (AP) — The Latest on Arizona's budget (all times local): 1:45 a.m. The Arizona Legislature has passed a $9.6 billion budget after a week spent wrangling over additional funding for K-12 schools that wasn't included in the initial agreement. Lawmakers debated until nearly 2 a.m. Wednesday morning before enacting a spending package for the state budget year beginning July 1 that included a small increase in funding for several school line items. The Republican majority passed a series of tax breaks that mainly benefits businesses. Democrats attempted to restore a health insurance program for children of the working poor that was closed to enrollment in 2010 amid a state funding crunch.

  • Syrian state media say rebel shelling kills 3 in Aleppo

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    DAMASCUS, Syria (AP) — Syrian state media say three people have been killed in renewed rebel shelling of government-held areas in the deeply contested northern city of Aleppo. State TV says that also on Wednesday, government troops repelled a rebel attack on an Aleppo suburb controlled by the government. Pro-opposition activists confirmed the report, adding that government forces regained control of a former mall that had become a new front line with rebel fighters in the western part of the city. Aleppo, Syria's former commercial center and its largest city, has been at the center of the conflict for the past two weeks, shattering a limited cease-fire that began in late February.

  • After ships and planes, Chinese singers assert sea claims

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    BEIJING (AP) — China's military has dispatched ships and planes — even constructed new islands to assert its maritime claims. Now it's deploying a new set of tools to uphold Chinese sovereignty: Magicians, singers and actors. Famed singer of patriotic anthems Song Zuying headlined a tour of China's man-made islands in the South China Sea's Spratly islands this week, underscoring Beijing's confidence in asserting its increasingly dominant position in the disputed region. The performance, entitled "The People's Navy Advances," included songs, skits and magic tricks, part of a long tradition of the People's Liberation Army art troops putting on shows to entertain, promote ideological conformity and stir public pride in the m

  • Movie review: ‘Pele’ traces soccer legend’s early years

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    Brothers Jeff and Michael Zimbalist, noted documentary filmmakers, tackle their first narrative feature film in “Pele: Birth of a Legend,” about legendary Brazilian soccer star and “Athlete of the Century” Pele. While the format may be new, the subject matter certainly is not: They know the worlds of both Brazil and soccer, from their excellent documentaries “Favela Rising” and “The Two Escobars,” and are therefore a natural choice to bring Pele’s early years to the screen. The “Birth of a Legend” subtitle is an important one here. The film culminates with the 1958 World Cup in Sweden, where Pele made his international soccer debut at the age of 17, and instantly skyrocketed to legend status.

  • Cal Thomas: Socialism’s false promise

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    Given its track record, one wonders why socialism is gaining in popularity in the U.S. and what appeal it has to a generation that, apparently, knows little about it. A recent survey from Harvard University has found that 51 percent of young people between the ages of 18 and 29 do not support capitalism. Just 42 percent support the economic system that has allowed even the poorest American to live better and to have more opportunity for advancement than most of the rest of the world. Thirty-three percent of those surveyed support socialism.

  • Cancer survival rates higher at academic medical centers, study says

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    Patients treated at specialty cancer hospitals have a 10 percent lower chance of dying in the first year than those who receive care at community hospitals, according to a study of Medicare claims and other data published in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study, funded and produced by Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York, analyzed survival and administrative data for about 750,000 Medicare patients treated for cancer in 2006 at hospitals throughout the country. Researchers found significant survival differences between different types of hospitals caring for Medicare patients with cancer.

  • What’s new: Books on Meryl Streep and the Middle East, plus a novel by Chitra Banerjee Divakaruni

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    HER AGAIN: Becoming Meryl Streep, by Michael Schulman. Contrary to Streep’s speculation at the 2012 Academy Awards ceremony (“Her again?”), America hasn’t tired of seeing her collect awards (19 Oscar nominations and counting). A New Yorker magazine editor reflects on her early career on Broadway, in Shakespeare in the Park and in films such as “The Deer Hunter.” (Harper, $26.99) A RAGE FOR ORDER: The Middle East in Turmoil, From Tahrir Square to ISIS, by Robert F. Worth. How did the promise of 2011’s Arab Spring — with high hopes for democracy and civil rights — end in violence and crackdown throughout much of the Middle East? A former New York Times Beirut bureau chief looks at political and social developments i

  • A lifeline for Puerto Rico

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    The following editorial appeared in the Los Angeles Times on Tuesday, May 3: ——— Drowning in red ink, the Puerto Rican government missed another big debt payment Monday. And while the island has defaulted on such bills multiple times over the past year, the process can’t go on much longer — the government has been cashing out whatever it can get its hands on just to keep operating. Meanwhile, it faces a growing number of lawsuits that could make it harder, if not impossible, to chart an orderly path out of its fiscal misery. That’s why it’s encouraging to see leaders of the U.S. House of Representatives and the Obama administration converging on a sensible proposal to help the territory climb out from unde

  • Richard Russo discusses ‘Everybody’s Fool,’ a sequel to his 1993 novel, ‘Nobody’s Fool’

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    Fans of Richard Russo will agree: “Empire Falls” (2001) may have won the Pulitzer Prize, and “Straight Man” (1997) is one of the funniest books ever set on a college campus, but “Nobody’s Fool” (1993) occupies a uniquely tender spot in our hearts. That novel introduced the lovable misfits, dreamers and hard cases of the fictional town of North Bath, N.Y. — a blue-collar backwater whose prospects dried up with its hot springs years ago. The central character, Donald Sullivan, known as Sully, a mostly unemployed construction worker and practical joker, became even more unforgettable when played by Paul Newman in the 1994 movie, which also starred Jessica Tandy and Philip Seymour Hoffman.

  • How comic book movies are making comic books worse

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    This year, the Marvel/Disney movie “Captain America: Civil War,” which opens Friday, takes the coveted spot of Superhero Movie That Kicks Off Blockbuster Season. Which could also be known as A Good Time To Be Reminded That Superhero Comics Are Now Way Too Much Like Movies. I am not going to complain about superhero movies as movies. I don’t care that once colorful costumes are forced to be muted and dark and tough-looking on human actors (“Batman v Superman,” the black leather X-Men).

  • Daybook-Wednesday-General

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    Associated Press Daybook-Wednesday-General for Wednesday, May. 04. The daybook is for planning purposes only and is not intended for publication or broadcast. You should verify any event you plan to cover. Please keep the AP in mind when news develops. -------------------- Wednesday, May. 04 8:30 AM Department of the Treasury quarterly refunding announcement - Department of the Treasury quarterly refunding announcement, outlining its funding needs for the next two quarters, incl which securities will be offered and the dates of their announcement, auction, and settlement * Release followed by press conference at the Department of the Treasury (10:00 AM EDT) Location: TBD http://www.treasury.

  • Mid Atlantic Daybook

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    Associated Press Mid Atlantic Daybook for Wednesday, May. 04. The daybook is for planning purposes only and is not intended for publication or broadcast. You should verify any event you plan to cover. Please keep the AP in mind when news develops. The Mid-Atlantic bureau is reachable at 202-641-9660 and 410-837-8315. Send daybook items to MidAtlantic@applanner.com. -------------------- Wednesday, May. 04 8:30 AM National Science Foundation / UMD Future STEM Leaders event - Future STEM Leaders event, bringing together national experts from academia, government and industry to discuss the future of graduate training in STEM fields (and beyond), co-sponsored by the National Science Foundation and the University of Ma

  • Abduction, murder leaves Navajo community heartbroken

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    SHIPROCK, N.M. (AP) — The stranger walked with 11-year-old Ashlynne Mike into the hills of a remote area of the Navajo Nation known for its breathtaking views and the monolithic rock outcropping that stands as a beacon for miles. As the sun faded, the stranger returned alone with a crowbar tucked in his jacket; the girl was nowhere to be seen. Her body was found hours later. But as he came back, her distraught and scared 9-year-old brother started to run and kept running for more than two miles toward the lights he could see on the highway in the distance until a passer-by scooped him up and took him to police. "He was so tired and just crying and crying for his sister.

  • Virginia Supreme Court recognizes gay couples in divorce law

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — The Supreme Court of Virginia has ruled that a person doesn't need to pay alimony to a former spouse if the payee is in a new relationship with a member of the same sex. The decision clarifies a section of Virginia's divorce law which states that alimony payments can be cut off if the payee remarries or has been cohabiting with another person for at least a year. The case stemmed from the 2008 divorce of Michael Luttrell and Samantha Cucco. Luttrell had agreed to pay alimony to Cucco for eight years, but sought to end payments in 2014 because Cucco was engaged to a new partner. Cucco had argued the situation didn't qualify as cohabitation because she was in a relationship with someone of the same

  • Alaska town's first liquor store in more than 40 years opens

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — An Alaska town's first liquor store in more than 40 years has opened, and the police chief there worries he won't have enough officers to handle an expected spike in alcohol-related calls. The AC Quickstop opened to a small crowd Tuesday in Bethel, a community of about 6,200 people in southwest Alaska that was founded by Yup'ik Eskimos. The new business is owned by Alaska Commercial Co., which has 31 stores in remote communities around the state. The Bethel store had about 50 customers within the first hour of business, AC general manager Walter Pickett said. The company already has eight Alaska stores that sell alcohol, he said.

  • Car bomb attack in southeast Turkey kills 1, wounds 6

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    ISTANBUL (AP) — Turkey's state-run news agency says a soldier was killed and six others were wounded in a car bomb attack against their outpost in southeastern Turkey. The Anadolu Agency said Wednesday Kurdish rebels detonated an explosives-packed vehicle outside a gendarmerie station in Mardin province. It blamed the attack on "terrorists" linked to the Kurdistan Workers' Party, or PKK. Ankara and its Western allies designate the group as a terrorist organization. Turkey's southeast plunged into conflict last summer when a fragile peace process between the state and autonomy-seeking Kurdish rebels. Since then, the army has carried out significant military operations in pre-dominantly Kurdish districts, displaci

  • San Francisco officials save backyard pine tree from the ax

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A spindly pine tree standing all alone in a tiny backyard became an official landmark Tuesday in San Francisco, a city that boasts such picturesque sights as the Golden Gate Bridge and Fisherman's Wharf. City leaders voted unanimously to grant the status to a Norfolk pine hybrid after it was championed by residents who said it gives their neighborhood its beauty and a sense of home. The owner of the property where it stands wanted to tear it down. His lawyer said the 100-foot-tall tree was dangerous and too large for the small parcel. "It's a good example of a community standing up to protect the environment," Eric Mar, a member of the Board of Supervisors, said after the vote.




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