• Scientists: 3 wolves remain at Isle Royale National Park

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The gray wolves of Isle Royale National Park, which scientists have studied closely for more than half a century along with the moose on which they feed, are on the verge of disappearing as the most recent census showed that only three remain, scientists said Friday. Inbreeding and illness appear to have caused a sharp drop-off in wolf numbers on the Lake Superior island wilderness, where visitors thrill at hearing their quavering howls. The count stood at 24 in 2009 but has fallen every year since, according to Michigan Technological University researchers who lead what they describe as the world's longest-running study of a predator-prey relationship in a closed ecosystem.

  • Alabama officials: 'Military mistress' released by mistake

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    MOBILE, Ala. (AP) — An Alabama sheriff's deputy released a woman dubbed the "Military Mistress," who is wanted in three states, because a radio dispatcher failed to pass along that there were warrants out for her arrest, the agency said Friday. Bobbi Ann Finley, who got her nickname because of allegations that she moved from military base to military base marrying more than a dozen U.S. service members to gain access to their bank accounts, is wanted on check fraud charges in Colorado, Oklahoma and Oregon. But a Mobile County deputy who stopped the woman and her husband wasn't informed that she was wanted, said Lori Myles, a spokeswoman for the Mobile County Sheriff's Office. "The bottom line on all of it was a failur

  • At least 3 people injured in gas-line blast; both directions of big California highway closed

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — At least 3 people injured in gas-line blast; both directions of big California highway closed.

  • Fish found in suspected tsunami debris boat quarantined

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The wreckage of a fishing boat that appears to be debris from the 2011 Japanese tsunami was carrying some unexpected passengers — fish from Japanese waters — when it was spotted off the Oregon coast. Scientists say 21 yellowtail jacks and one Asian striped knifejaw hitched a cross-Pacific ride in the bow of the boat found last week. Fish washed up in debris can bring parasites and diseases to native species, but biologists say the latest fish pose little threat. Still, they have been quarantined at the Oregon Coast Aquarium and will be available for public viewing. It's not the first time that dislocated fish were found in Northwest waters. Last month, a striped knifejaw turned up in a

  • Prosecutor: Reputed mobster discussed stolen Boston artwork

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — A reputed Connecticut mobster suspected of a connection to the artwork stolen from Boston's Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in 1990 discussed the paintings with an undercover FBI agent, a prosecutor said Friday. Robert Gentile, who was appearing in court on weapons charges, has been identified by the FBI as the last surviving person of interest in the robbery of artwork worth an estimated $500 million. At the hearing, prosecutor John Durham said that Gentile had discussed a sale of paintings stolen from the Gardner museum. He did not provide further detail on what came of the purported discussions. Gentile has not been charged in connection with the missing artwork, and a spokesman for the U.S.

  • Oklahoma governor signs bill allowing nitrogen in executions

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahoma became the first U.S. state to approve nitrogen gas for executions under a measure Gov. Mary Fallin signed into law Friday that provides an alternative death penalty method if lethal injections aren't possible, either because of a court ruling or a drug shortage. Executions are on hold in Oklahoma while the U.S. Supreme Court considers whether the state's current three-drug method of lethal injection is constitutional. Supporters of the new law maintain nitrogen-induced hypoxia is a humane and painless method of execution that requires no medical expertise to perform. "Oklahoma executes murderers whose crimes are especially heinous," Fallin said in a statement announcing that she had signed the

  • Lawyer to judge: New NCAA head-injury deal as bad as first

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    CHICAGO (AP) — A dissenting plaintiff's attorney told a federal judge Friday that a reworked class-action head-injury settlement with the NCAA is as bad as the one the same judge rejected in December — though other attorneys defended it. The hearing in U.S. District Court in Chicago, where around ten similar suits nationwide were consolidated into the one case, was the first since the new proposed agreement was unveiled this week. In giving the first proposal the thumbs-down, Judge John Lee raised several concerns, including that the $70 million the NCAA pledged to set aside to test current and former athletes for signs of brain injury might be too little. Around 4.

  • Suspicious vehicle at arsenal checkpoint prompts evacuation

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    ROCKAWAY TOWNSHIP, N.J. (AP) — A suspicious vehicle was stopped at a security checkpoint at an arsenal on Friday, triggering an evacuation and tying up traffic nearby, but it was later deemed to pose no explosive threat. The Picatinny Arsenal was evacuated for several hours after security personnel noticed something suspicious within the vehicle as it approached a gate. Authorities treated the situation as an explosive threat. The driver was detained and questioned, but it was unknown if he'll face criminal charges. Employees were instructed to leave the post Friday afternoon. A stretch of highway near the post was closed, causing major travel backups in the area throughout the evening commute.

  • USDA confirms bird flu at 5th South Dakota turkey farm

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Five commercial turkey farms in South Dakota have now been infected with a bird flu strain that's led to the deaths of more than 250,000 turkeys in the state and over 2.4 million birds in the Midwest. The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service announced Friday that the H5N2 strain of avian influenza in a flock of 66,000 birds in a Roberts County farm in the far northeastern corner of the state, marking South Dakota's largest outbreak to date. The approximately 6-mile quarantine zone that officials set up around the impacted farm also stretches into parts of North Dakota and Minnesota. Dr.

  • Michelle Obama, Jill Biden visit Maryland veterans center

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Wayne Miller was 18 when he lost his leg and became temporarily paralyzed after being hit by a mortar round during the Vietnam War. He told his friends he'd been in a motorcycle accident. "It was a tough time," said Miller, who had to readjust his social life while being cared for by his parents. Now 64 and walking with only a slight limp from his metal left leg, Miller is a social worker and the team leader of the Silver Spring Vet Center. On Friday, Miller served as guide during a visit by Michelle Obama and Jill Biden, who toured the therapeutic services center as part of their Joining Forces initiative, which highlights the need to provide resources and support for military members

  • Correction: Bird Flu story

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — In a story April 16 about bird flu, The Associated Press reported erroneously that recent outbreaks had led to the death of more than 2.5 million turkeys and chickens. The correct figure at the time was more than 2.4 million, and not all the birds slated to be euthanized had been. A corrected version of the story is below: USDA veterinarian: Bird flu outbreak could be 'devastating' Top USDA veterinarian: Bird flu outbreak may last for years and be 'devastating' to poultry By STEVE KARNOWSKI Associated Press ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — The nation's poultry industry may have to live with a deadly bird flu strain for several years, which would be "devastating," the U.S.

  • Chicago schools chief to take temporary leave amid probe

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    CHICAGO (AP) — Chicago Public Schools CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett will take a paid leave of absence amid a federal investigation over a roughly $20 million no-bid contract the district awarded to a training academy where she once worked as a consultant, officials announced Friday. The schools chief of the nation's third-largest district — chosen by Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel in 2012 — requested the leave effective Monday, which the Chicago Board of Education agreed to. "In light of the attention given to my position as chief executive officer of the Chicago Public Schools, I believe that my continuing as CEO at this time would be a distraction," Byrd-Bennett wrote in a letter to board members Friday.

  • Police pledge thorough probe of death after stun gun shock

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    HAGERSTOWN, Md. (AP) — Police in Maryland promised a thorough investigation Friday into the death of a man in custody after police shocked him with a stun gun outside a home he had allegedly broken into. Darrell Lawrence Brown, 31, died early Friday morning after at least one officer shocked him. Brown had ignored police commands to get down on the ground and instead became aggressive, according to police and eyewitnesses. Several people who watched the encounter late Thursday night said officers didn't punch or kick Brown before or after he was shocked and handcuffed. "They were pretty much doing their job," said neighbor Robert Holmes, who added that from what he saw, the police did not get physical with Brown.

  • Hunter-Reay disagrees with penalty over role in 3-car wreck

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    LONG BEACH, Calif. (AP) — Ryan Hunter-Reay vehemently disagreed with the penalty IndyCar levied against him for a three-car accident at New Orleans. The series docked the Indianapolis 500 winner three points and placed him on probation for three races for what IndyCar called "avoidable contact" in last Sunday's race. "I think it's BS and I told them that," Hunter-Reay told The Indianapolis Star on Friday at Long Beach. "I've had a lot of guys come to me, a lot of drivers come to me, a lot of ex-drivers come to me, and tell me the same thing ... they all disagree with the call." Simon Pagenaud ran off course as he raced three-wide with Hunter-Reay and Sebastien Bourdais following a late restart.

  • 24 new HIV cases reported in Indiana outbreak, 130 total

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — An Indiana county at the heart of an HIV outbreak has seen a "significant increase" in the number of cases more than two weeks into a short-term needle exchange program approved by Gov. Mike Pence, state health officials said Friday. The Indiana State Department of Health said there are now 120 confirmed HIV cases and 10 preliminary positive cases tied to Scott County, about 30 miles north of Louisville, Kentucky. That's up from 106 last week. Health officials who declared an epidemic last month have said they expect the number of cases to rise as more people are tested. But the growing number could put pressure on Pence to extend the 30-day needle exchange program that he approved March 26.

  • Why banks made more money last quarter

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street and Main Street gave banks a boost last quarter. Fees from corporate mergers and commissions from trading fueled profits at big financial firms. But average Americans also helped by taking out more home loans and paying off their debts. Here's a look at what drove the first-quarter results: HOME LOAN JUMP: Ultra-low interest rates led to a surge of refinancing and new home loans in the first quarter. JPMorgan Chase created $24.7 billion worth of mortgages, up 45 percent from a year earlier, while Bank of America put together mortgages worth $13.7 billion, up 54 percent. Wells Fargo, the nation's largest mortgage lender, generated $49 billion in home loans, up 36 percent from the same period

  • Iran urges UN to try to end Saudi-led bombing in Yemen

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Iran's foreign minister urged U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Friday to try to end "the senseless aerial attacks" in Yemen by a Saudi-led coalition and establish a cease-fire. Javad Zarif said in a letter, obtained by The Associated Press, that airstrikes by the regional coalition of Sunni Muslim countries are destroying hospitals, schools, roads, food factories and power plants, and have targeted residential areas including refugee camps, killing and injuring innocent civilians. "This critical situation is escalating and the humanitarian crisis in Yemen is approaching catastrophic dimensions," he said.

  • Nashville teen accused of making multiple threats to schools

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A Nashville teen has been arrested after allegedly sending emails filled with graphic threats to blow up schools and massacre teachers and students, authorities said. An FBI affidavit records threats sent to 12 schools in Nashville; Pittsburgh; Brockton and Whitman, Massachusetts; and Burke, Virginia beginning March 16. Some schools were threatened more than once, and the threats became progressively longer, more specific and more gruesome. An email sent early Thursday to Nashville's Antioch High School threatened a "columbine or sandy hook like shooting" and made graphically violent threats against a specific teacher. Police closed the school at 9:45 a.m. Thursday and wouldn't clear it to open

  • 2 years after marathon bombing, state renews offer of aid

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    BOSTON (AP) — Massachusetts is renewing its push to aid those injured and traumatized by the Boston Marathon bombing, the state's attorney general said Friday. The state's Office of Victim Assistance is continuing to offer survivors of the attack access to experts on mental health, rehabilitation and hearing loss, Attorney General Maura Healey said. Ongoing trauma can manifest in a number of ways, from trouble sleeping and feelings of isolation to an inability to focus and being easily startled by loud noises, said Liam Lowney, executive director of the victim assistance office. "These are all normal reactions to violence," he said. He urged those who have experienced the symptoms after the attacks — or other

  • Slow start to elver season means high price for baby eels

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Maine's baby eel season is off to a slow start, causing prices to balloon back to historic levels as fishermen wait for waterways to finish thawing. Elvers, also called glass eels, are sold overseas as seed stock for Asian aquaculture companies that raise them to maturity and sell them as food. Maine fishermen are by far the largest supplier of elvers in the U.S. Some end up back in America in restaurants as sushi. The fishery for the baby eels is one of the most valuable in Maine, even though value dropped in 2014. Fishermen caught 9,690 pounds of elvers last year at an average price of $874.52 per pound, according to state data.




Advertisement