• The Latest: NYPD says shot-at officer was clearly a cop

    Updated: 14 hr ago

    10:30 p.m. New York Police Department Commissioner William Bratton said a plainclothes officer shot in the head Saturday is in stable condition and undergoing surgery. Bratton said Officer Brian Moore and his partner Erik Jansen were pulling up on Demetrius Blackwell in their unmarked police car to stop and question him because he was acting suspiciously. Police have said the officers noticed a dip in his waistband suggestive of concealing a handgun. Bratton said the officers exchanged words with Blackwell when the 35-year-old man turned and fired at least two rounds into the car. Bratton said it was clear Moore and Jansen were police. The commissioner said Jansen radioed for help and a nearby patrol car rus

  • NYPD plainclothes officer shot in head; suspect arrested

    Updated: 14 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — A plainclothes New York City police officer was shot in the head and critically injured while in an unmarked police car Saturday as he and his partner attempted to stop and question a man they suspected of carrying a gun, officials said. Officer Brian Moore and his partner, Erik Jansen, noticed Demetrius Blackwell "walking and adjusting an object in his waistband" when they pulled up on him in their car, exchanging words with him before he turned and suddenly fired at least two rounds into the car, police Commissioner William Bratton said.

  • Small fires at Ohio recycling plant still flicker

    Updated: 14 hr ago

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Fire crews remain at the Phoenix Recycling complex after a large fire Friday spewed thick black smoke into the air over Ohio's capital city and prompted nearby residents to remain indoors. Battalion Chief Tracy Smith says small fires continue to burn at the plant in Columbus and environmental officials are monitoring the air quality. Fire officials recommend that residents shelter in place as a precaution. She emphasized Sunday that no homes are at risk. Power that was shut down to over 20,000 residents after the fire started has been restored. Investigators have determined the origin of the fire but have not yet figured out what caused it. Officials give a preliminary estimate of $8 millio

  • Mayweather-Pacquiao prizefight delayed amid high TV demand

    Updated: 14 hr ago

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — The most anticipated boxing fight in years was delayed because of high pay-per-view demand causing problems for cable and satellite systems. Jim Lampley, the main telecaster for the Floyd Mayweather-Manny Pacquiao showdown in Las Vegas told viewers Saturday night that "electronic overload" caused cable and satellite operators to ask for a delay. Scores of angry tweets directed at various providers complained of problems with both ordering and watching. Some users said when they tried to order, the fight wasn't available. Others complained of picture problems or an inability to tune to the pay-per-view channel.

  • David Goldberg, tech exec married to 'Lean In' author, dies

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — David Goldberg, a popular Silicon Valley executive and husband of Facebook second-in-command and "Lean In" author Sheryl Sandberg, has died suddenly at age 47, his company and family members said Saturday. Goldberg was CEO of online survey questionnaire provider SurveyMonkey. He died Friday night, the company said in a statement on its website. Family members also reported the death, via postings on Facebook. Neither the company nor family released a cause or other details about his death. Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg told The New York Times that Goldberg died while he was on vacation abroad with his wife. "Dave Goldberg was an amazing person, and I am glad I got to know him," Zuckerbe

  • Floyd Mayweather uses defense and accuracy to outpoint Manny Pacquiao in richest fight ever

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Floyd Mayweather uses defense and accuracy to outpoint Manny Pacquiao in richest fight ever.

  • 'We need help': Aid scarce in quake-hit Nepal villages

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    PAUWATHOK, Nepal (AP) — At the entrance of this destroyed mountain village stands a wooden sign cobbled together from the debris of homes flattened by Nepal's devastating earthquake. Its message: "WE NEED HELP. PLEASE HELP." A steep winding road leads up to the ruins of the small village of Pauwathok, perched on a ridge about 1,100 meters (3,600 feet) above sea level. It's just 50 kilometers (30 miles) east of Kathmandu, Nepal's capital. But villagers say not one government official, not one soldier has visited since the massive quake struck a week ago, underscoring just how unprepared and overwhelmed Nepal's government has been. Early Saturday, a convoy of covered trucks approached Pauwathok.

  • The Latest on Nepal: Diarrhea fears in worst-hit quake areas

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    10:10 a.m. (0425 GMT) Nepal's health secretary says there have been reports of people being hit by diarrhea in several districts in remote mountain villages worst-hit by the April 25 earthquake. However, he says there is no epidemic yet and authorities hope to bring it under control. Health Secretary Santa Shrestha said Sunday that health teams with medicine have rushed to many of the affected areas. Earlier, the U.N. children's agency, UNICEF, warned of the risks of disease on children following the quake. "With the monsoon season only a few weeks away, children will be at heightened risk of diseases like cholera and diarrhea infections, as well as being more vulnerable to the threat of landslides and floods," th

  • Damaged by deadly quake, fate of Nepal heritage unsure

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) — Perched on a hilltop, the blue-rimmed eyes of Kathmandu's gold-spired Swayambhunath stupa have long stared silently across this sprawling city nestled in the Himalayan foothills. But since Nepal was shattered by a mammoth earthquake a week ago, those eyes have gazed upon a nation in mourning — and on a microcosm of its despair inside the ancient temple itself. Here, monkeys scurry across the demolished ruins of a pair of precious bullet-shaped edifices built by King Pratap Malla in the 1600s. Saffron-robed monks haul golden relics and carpets out of a ruined monastery. The temple now has its own population of displaced — priests and vendors huddle under tents, after their own homes in the complex

  • McIlroy in a fight with Casey until darkness gets in the way

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Those weren't boxing gloves Rory McIlroy was wearing, they were thick hand-warmers. In the Pacific chill and approaching darkness, the world's No. 1 player had every reason to feel like he was in a fight of his own Saturday in the Match Play Championship against Paul Casey. It was a no-decision. McIlroy missed from 12 feet on the 18th hole. Casey had a chance to win on the second extra hole when his 18-foot putt stopped one turn short. McIlroy, moving in for the knockout, missed from 6 feet on the third extra hole. Barely able to see, McIlroy and Casey were forced to return Sunday morning at TPC Harding Park to see who made it to the semifinals. They were to resume at 6:45 a.m.

  • On 150th anniversary, Lincoln's hometown re-enacts funeral

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — At Abraham Lincoln's death, Secretary of War Edwin Stanton declared, "Now he belongs to the ages," but the meticulous, 150th anniversary funeral procession his hometown presented Saturday proved how profoundly the prairie city still considers the slain president its own. Thousands of people, including many in period costume, gathered at the Old State Capitol, where the 16th president lay in state, to pay tribute to the simple, country lawyer who saved the Union and thrust the nation toward abolishing slavery.

  • After calm protests in Oakland, smaller group turns violent

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Oakland's mayor and police chief acknowledged Saturday falling short in controlling what police said was a night of some of the heaviest damage yet in peaceful marches that have turned violent. Up to 400 people roamed dozens of blocks of Oakland's downtown Friday night to Saturday morning, breaking the glass fronts of banks and a few other businesses and systematically smashing the windshields of rows of vehicles at one car lot. Police Chief Sean Whent, speaking Saturday to reporters at City Hall, said the overnight damage "was amongst the worst we had seen" in more than 1½ years of sometimes-violent protests here over instances of police killings of African-American men around the country.

  • Nigeria: Nearly 300 freed women, children led to safety

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    YOLA, Nigeria (AP) — Their faces were gaunt, their hair tinted orange, their stomachs distended, all signs of malnutrition. They looked ragged, lost, shattered. But the girls were alive and free. They were among a group of 275 children and women rescued from Boko Haram extremists, the first to arrive at a refugee camp Saturday after a three-day journey to safety, brought by Nigeria's military. They came from the Sambisa Forest, the last stronghold of the Islamic extremists, where the Nigerian military said it has rescued more than 677 girls and women and destroyed more than a dozen insurgent camps in the past week. Two newborns were among the first arrivals.

  • The Latest: Keep black cats away from Baffert

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — 9:45 p.m. And now, on to the Preakness for Kentucky Derby winner American Pharoah, but trainer Bob Baffert could do without any black cats around the stakes barn at Pimlico Race Course in Baltimore. Baffert has a thing about black cats. He goes out of his way to avoid them, believing they represent the ultimate symbol of bad luck to a horse trainer. In 1998, when Real Quiet lost the Triple Crown in the last stride, a black cat crossed Baffert's path. In 2001, Point Given was on his way to the track and a black cat jumped out in front of him. Leading up to Derby week, Baffert picked up his son Bode and a black cat crossed in front of the car. "I stopped the car so fast. I hung a U-tur

  • State's Attorney details roles of each of 6 charged officers

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    Six officers are charged in Freddie Gray's death from injuries he suffered while in police custody. State's Attorney Marilyn J. Mosby says the officers repeatedly failed to get Gray medical treatment after his arrest. The police officers' union has said they are not responsible for Gray's death. Here is a look at each of the six officers. ___ OFFICER CAESAR R. GOODSON Jr. Goodson was the driver of the van that transported Freddie Gray, and he faces the most serious charges. Mosby said Friday that Goodson repeatedly failed — at least five times — to seatbelt Gray in the transport vehicle. Overall, Goodson faces six charges, including "second-degree depraved heart murder," which carries a potential 30-year sente

  • Snow, cold keep New England skiers, riders stoked into May

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — Skiers and snowboarders at Vermont's Sugarbush resort right now can spend the morning on the slopes and play golf in the afternoon — testament to the abundance of snow that extended the season at many northern New England ski areas. Sugarbush is one of more than half dozen areas in Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine still operating this weekend. New Hampshire's Wildcat Mountain in Pinkham Notch prides itself on being the state's last ski area open in the spring but marketing director Thomas Prindle says they haven't made it into May in more than a decade. "We've had six months of a phenomenal season," said Prindle, noting Wildcat was the first New Hampshire area to open on Nov. 9.

  • Owner Ahmed Zayat finally gets his Kentucky Derby victory

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Finally, a trip to the Kentucky Derby winner's circle for Ahmed Zayat. After three disappointing runner-up finishes, the owner won his first Derby when favorite American Pharoah took the Run for the Roses on Saturday before at record crowd of 170,513 at Churchill Downs. The owner from Egypt who lives in New Jersey celebrated with his trainer Bob Baffert and jockey Victor Espinoza, both of whom are well acquainted with winning the Derby. Baffert won his fourth, Espinoza his third. "To win this Derby, this is for the Zayats who have suffered so much running these seconds, since Bodemeister and Pioneerof the Nile," Baffert said. "We know what it is to just get completely punched right in the face."

  • American Pharoah gives trainer a long-awaited 4th Derby win

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — Three times in seven years, Bob Baffert left the Kentucky Derby empty-handed. Two seconds and a sixth-place finish by the wagering favorite. After a while, those close calls started taking a toll. Even for a three-time Derby winner. "When you get beat like that, all these seconds, you get to a point in your life, maybe it's not just going to happen for me," said Baffert, 62, who suffered a heart attack in Dubai three years ago. "And then they sent me this horse. And I thought, 'Wow, here's my chance. Don't mess it up, Bob.'" On this first Saturday in May, Baffert knew he had the best horse in American Pharoah. Still, he needed a dynamic performance and some old-fashioned racing luck.

  • Peaceful Baltimore demonstrators praise top prosecutor

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    BALTIMORE (AP) — At a grassy plaza across from Baltimore's City Hall filled with thousands of people on Saturday, speakers praised the city's young top prosecutor for quickly moving forward with charges against the police officers they see as responsible for the death of a 25-year-old unarmed black man who suffered a fatal spinal injury in their custody. The peaceful scene was a striking contrast to demonstrations the past two weeks at the same plaza. Crowds of angry protesters demanded that the city's leaders heed their cries for justice, and one night, the protests gave way to looting, rioting and arson. On Friday morning, four days after the most violent civil unrest since the assassination of the Rev.

  • Experts: Convictions will be tough to win in Baltimore case

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    BALTIMORE (AP) — Baltimore's top prosecutor acted swiftly in charging six officers in the death of Freddie Gray, who suffered a grave spinal injury as he was arrested and put into a police transport van, handcuffed and without a seat belt. But getting a jury to convict police officers of murder and manslaughter will be far harder than obtaining arrest warrants. Legal experts say the case is fraught with challenges. A widely shown video that captured the nation's attention shows Gray, 25, being loaded into the van, but not what happened once he was inside. Other than the accused officers, the only known witness is a convicted criminal later placed in the van's other holding cell, unable to see what was happening with Gray.




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