• Harvard athlete among 1st openly transgender NCAA swimmers

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) — A Harvard athlete is among the first openly transgender swimmers in the NCAA. Schuyler Bailar, an incoming freshman, was initially recruited for the women's swimming team but came out as transgender this year. After he told the women's coach, Harvard surprised Bailar with an offer to join either the men's or women's team. On the women's team, the 19-year-old from McLean, Virginia, would have had a shot at breaking records, but he joined the men's team to embrace his identity. The coach of the men's team says his athletes welcome Bailar's enthusiasm and work ethic. Jay Pulitano, a Division III athlete at Sarah Lawrence College, competed on the women's team before joining the men's team in

  • Atlanta Cyclorama to leave building it occupied since 1921

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    ATLANTA (AP) — The Atlanta Cyclorama, a colossal Civil War painting created about 130 years ago, is leaving the building it has occupied since 1921 to move across town. Cyclorama officials said Tuesday was the last day visitors could see the 15,000-square-foot oil painting in Atlanta's Grant Park neighborhood. The panoramic painting is displayed in a cylinder that rotates slowly as a narrator describes its content. The painting will now be prepared for its move across town to a new addition being built at the Atlanta History Center in the Buckhead area. The task of moving the 358-foot-long, 42-foot-high painting won't be easy.

  • Sentence postponed for gambler in Toledo sports probe

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    DETROIT (AP) — Lawyers for a Detroit-area gambler caught in a sports bribery scandal at the University of Toledo say it would be "unthinkable" to send the ailing 82-year-old man to prison. Mitchell "Ed" Karam is the last of nine people to be sentenced. He was expected in Detroit federal court Tuesday, but the hearing was postponed. The ringleader, Ghazi Manni, recently was sentenced to nearly six years in federal prison. The U.S. government says Karam was the "money man" who split the bribes with Manni. Seven Toledo basketball and football players got money and other perks to alter their play to affect games a decade ago. Karam's lawyers quote doctors as saying he'll soon be bedridden because of his many health woes.

  • USDA: Record soybean crop planted, progress slowed by rain

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — A record 85.1 million acres of soybeans are in the ground, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said Tuesday, but it's not clear whether they'll all sprout because persistent rain in some Midwestern states has flooded fields and slowed plant development. The planted soybean acreage is 2 percent more than in 2014, with the largest increases found in Illinois, Indiana, Minnesota and Tennessee. However, just 89 percent of soybean seeds nationally have emerged from the ground — about 5 percentage points behind the five-year average. Corn and soybean conditions in Illinois, Indiana, Iowa and Ohio have shown deterioration in recent weeks with the heavy rain.

  • Bon Jovi's politics: Cash for Clinton, music for Christie

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    LIVINGSTON, N.J. (AP) — Bon Jovi is playing a big role in the 2016 presidential campaign in New Jersey. Jon Bon Jovi hosted a fundraiser for Democratic presidential contender Hillary Rodham Clinton on Monday night, and Republican Gov. Chris Christie used the New Jersey rocker's songs as his soundtrack as he announced Tuesday that he was also running for president. Bon Jovi says through a spokesman that his friendships are not political and that he gave Christie permission to use his songs. Christie often plays his songs at town hall events. There's no word on how much was raised at the Clinton event at a restaurant in Red Bank. It was offering open seating for $1,000 a head and $2,700 per person for premium seats.

  • Statue of white supremacist, former SC governor vandalized

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Authorities are investigating the vandalism of a statue of a segregationist South Carolina governor as the state grapples with heightened tension over Confederate symbols in the wake of a massacre at a black church. Red paint was seen dripping Tuesday from the statute of "Pitchfork" Ben Tillman on the Statehouse grounds in Columbia. Department of Public Safety spokeswoman Sherri Iacobelli said an officer saw what appeared to be a red paintball on the statue during morning rounds. Workers were cleaning the statue Tuesday afternoon. Tillman, a noted white supremacist who unapologetically advocated lynching any black who tried to vote, spent three decades — from 1890 to 1918 — as governor and as a U.S

  • Statue of Confederate Gen. Lee vandalized in Virginia

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — A statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee has been vandalized in Virginia. According to media reports, police received a report early Tuesday that the words "Black Lives Matter" had been painted on the base of the statue, which depicts Lee on horseback. A city crew had removed the painted words by noon. The Confederate battle flag and other symbols of the confederacy have been the focus of debate since the June 17 massacre at an African-American church in Charleston, South Carolina. The accused gunman had posed in photographs with the Confederate battle flag. Last week, vandals painted the same sentiment found on the Charlottesville statute on a monument in Richmond dedicated to Confederat

  • Woman sues, says police forced her to remove scarf

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) — A Muslim woman is suing a Michigan police department, saying her rights were violated when she was ordered to remove a headscarf for a mugshot after her arrest. Maha Aldhalimi was told that she was wanted for an unpaid parking violation. She says she was ordered to remove the headscarf, known as hijab, for a photo at the Dearborn Police Department last September. Aldhalimi says she was crying while explaining that removing the scarf in front of male strangers would violate her religious beliefs. She says she finally agreed to remove it under threat. Lawyers for Aldhalimi filed a lawsuit Tuesday in Detroit federal court, accusing Dearborn police of violating federal law. The city declined to comm

  • Hit-and-run case against UFC ex-champ Jon Jones stalls

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — An Albuquerque hit-and-run case against former UFC champion fighter Jon "Bones" Jones has stalled due to a delay in obtaining records, prosecutors said. The Bernalillo County District Attorney's Office said Monday a deadline had passed without the state moving forward because prosecutors are still waiting on dispatch reports and medical records for a pregnant women involved in the crash. The state had 60 days after the release of Jones to present a case to the court, District Attorney's Office spokeswoman Kayla Anderson said. Without the evidence in the records, she said, a judge could dismiss the case. Anderson, however, said prosecutors anticipate moving forward when they have a completed ca

  • AP News Guide: Oregon weed legal soon, but not legally sold

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Come Wednesday, the pot stashes in Oregon are legal — up to 8 ounces. So is the homegrown, up to four plants a household. The legalization of recreational marijuana on July 1 makes the state the fourth to do so, following Colorado, Washington state and Alaska. The nation's capital, Washington, D.C., also allows possession of personal amounts, though not sales. Here's a look at Oregon's law and the legal pot movement: WHAT CHANGES JULY 1 IN OREGON? Not much, actually. In populous parts of the state that have long been tolerant of marijuana, police don't generally bust people using it in private. Most important, though, is that under the new law it's still illegal to sell recreational marij

  • AP News Guide: Oregon weed legal soon, but not legally sold

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Come Wednesday, the pot stashes in Oregon are legal — up to 8 ounces. So is the homegrown, up to four plants a household. The legalization of recreational marijuana on July 1 makes the state the fourth to do so, following Colorado, Washington state and Alaska. The nation's capital, Washington, D.C., also allows possession of personal amounts, though not sales. Here's a look at Oregon's law and the legal pot movement: WHAT CHANGES JULY 1 IN OREGON? Not much, actually. In populous parts of the state that have long been tolerant of marijuana, police don't generally bust people using it in private. Most important, though, is that under the new law it's still illegal to sell recreational marij

  • UCC church to divest over Israeli treatment of Palestinians

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — The top legislative body of the United Church of Christ voted Tuesday to divest from companies with business in the Israeli-occupied Palestinian territories, in a sign of the growing momentum of a U.S. protest movement against Israeli policy. The denomination's General Synod endorsed the action on a vote of 508-124 with 38 abstentions during its meeting in Cleveland. The liberal Protestant group with 1.1 million members is the latest to take such action. Last year, the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) voted to sell stock in a few companies whose products are used by Israel in the territories. The United Church of Christ resolution was broader.

  • Trove of evidence turned over in case of Freddie Gray death

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    BALTIMORE (AP) — Prosecutors have turned over a massive trove of evidence to attorneys representing six officers charged in the death of Freddie Gray that includes thousands of documents, medical records and emails. State's Attorney Marilyn Mosby filed a list detailing what was turned over to the defense. However, the material will not be made public. Among the documents are recorded statements from the officers. That includes two statements each from Sgt. Alicia White, who is charged with manslaughter and Officer Caesar Goodson, who is also charged with "depraved-heart" murder. Goodson was driving the transport van in the back of which Gray suffered a fatal spinal injury. The other officers each made one statement to

  • Late Oregon teen among 18 to win Carnegie Medal for heroism

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    PITTSBURGH (AP) — A 16-year-old Oregon boy who drowned while trying unsuccessfully to save his younger brother's life is one of 18 people to be honored with a Carnegie Medal for heroism. S. Alexander Smith, of Aloha, jumped into the Row River upstream from a 15-foot waterfall to try to save his 13-year-old brother, Christian, on July 1, 2014. Both boys were carried over the falls and drowned. Smith was the only one of those honored Tuesday by the Pittsburgh-based Carnegie Hero Fund Commission who died during a rescue attempt. Another man, Bryon Snyder, 36, of Topeka, Kansas, helped rescue a woman who was abducted and threatened with a gun June 30, 2014.

  • Judge blocks new Florida law that delays abortions 24 hours

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — A Florida judge is blocking a new state law that requires women to wait 24 hours before getting an abortion. Chief Circuit Judge Charles Francis blocked the law Tuesday, one day before it was scheduled to take effect. The American Civil Liberties Union of Florida and the Center for Reproductive Rights filed a lawsuit after Republican Gov. Rick Scott signed it into law. They argued that the law violates the right to privacy guaranteed in the state constitution by interfering with the right of women to undergo the procedure. Francis wrote that state officials had not given any evidence to show why the new law is not a burden on privacy rights.

  • Man admits he conspired to traffic threatened turtle species

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — A New Jersey man has admitted he kept turtles considered threatened under state law at his home and shipped them to buyers by tying the animals live in tube socks and packing them in boxes. Federal prosecutors say 48-year-old Patrick Elfers of Jersey City pleaded guilty Tuesday to conspiring to traffic the threatened species. He faces up to five years in prison at his Sept. 29 sentencing. Elfers admitted that from December 2011 through March 2014, he had various species, including spotted turtles, North American wood turtles and Eastern box turtles without the required permit.

  • Israel deports Gaza flotilla activists

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel has deported a group of pro-Palestinian activists, including a former Tunisian president, who tried to breach its naval blockade of the Gaza Strip. Interior Ministry spokeswoman Sabine Haddad said among those sent home Tuesday was former Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki. Another 14 people on board the activist boat, which was peacefully intercepted early Monday, will be deported in the coming days. Gaza has been under an Israeli and Egyptian blockade since 2007, when the Islamic militant group Hamas seized control of the territory from forces loyal to Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas. Pro-Palestinian activists have launched flotillas aimed at drawing attention to the blockade ever since.

  • France's Orange prepares possible split from Israeli partner

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    PARIS (AP) — French telecommunications group Orange has reached a deal with its Israeli partner that could lead the way to their split, amid controversy and growing calls for companies to boycott Israel. An Orange spokesman insisted Tuesday that the company is not pulling out of Israel but rethinking its brand agreement with Israeli company Partner Communications. Orange said that the two companies reached an agreement that allows either of them to terminate the existing agreement. Orange would pay Partner up to 90 million euros ($100 million) if it's terminated within two years. Orange CEO Stephane Richard stoked anger last month by announcing he wanted to sever business ties with Israel.

  • Complaint: Family detention can lead to psychological harm

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    SAN ANTONIO (AP) — Detaining immigrant women and children who may have fled violence in their home country "creates or exacerbates" psychological trauma, according to a complaint filed Tuesday by immigrant rights groups with the Department of Homeland Security. The complaint asks for the agency's Office of Civil Rights and Civil Liberties to investigate 10 cases where mental health professionals who were contracted by attorneys attested to psychological issues, including anxiety, depression, and suicidal thoughts among detained women and children.

  • Rights group says airstrikes in Yemen killed many civilians

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Airstrikes carried out by the Saudi-led coalition on Saada City in northern Yemen which is controlled by Shiite rebels killed dozens of civilians in an apparent violation of the laws of war, Human Rights Watch said in a report Tuesday. The rights group said its investigators were able to visit Saada City on May 15-16 during a five-day humanitarian cease-fire and compile the names of 59 people killed in aerial attacks, including at least 35 children. It said satellite imagery showed over 210 impact locations in built-up areas consistent with aerial bombings.




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