• Chesapeake reaches tentative deal with city of Arlington on royalties

    Published: Tue, Aug 19, 2014

    The city of Arlington contended Chesapeake improperly calculated its royalties by deducting post-production costs and sales to affiliates, but the sides appear to have reached a settlement, according to the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.

  • BrightSource solar plant sets birds on fire as they fly overhead

    Published: Tue, Aug 19, 2014

    Workers at a state-of-the-art solar plant in the Mojave Desert have a name for birds that fly through the concentrated beams of solar energy focused upward by the plant's 300,000 mirrors — "streamers," for the smoke plume that comes from birds that ignite in midair, reports CBC Canada from AP. Federal wildlife investigators who visited BrightSource Energy's Ivanpah plant last year and watched as birds burned and fell, reporting an average of one "streamer" every two minutes, are urging California officials to halt the operator's application to build a still-bigger version. The investigators want the halt until the full extent of the deaths can be assessed. Estimates per year now range from a low of about a thousand by BrightSource to 28,000 by an expert for the Center for Biological Diversity environmental group.

  • John Stancavage: Gasoline price war breaks out again at two nearby convenience stores

    Published: Fri, Jul 25, 2014

    War has broken out again. For the second time in two weeks, two Tulsa convenience stores are battling over who has the cheapest local gasoline price, Tulsa World reports.

  • UK Supermarket To Power Itself With Food Waste

    Published: Thu, Jul 24, 2014

    Where does all the leftover food go when the grocery store closes at the end of the day? Maybe it's repurposed somehow or thrown out , but what if it could help a supermarket become energy independent? A Sainsbury's supermarket in the United Kingdom will soon power itself with leftover food waste and disconnect from the National Grid, Huffington Post reports. Sainsbury's is partnering with Biffa, one of the U.K.'s largest waste management companies, to make this possible. Sainsbury's trucks its food waste from all over the U.K. to Biffa's plant in Staffordshire. Biffa then converts it into biogas, and this biogas is then burned to meet the energy needs of a location in the town of Cannock.

  • Boone Pickens: 'I'm a patriotic American'

    Published: Wed, Jul 9, 2014

    Six years after veteran energy executive Boone Pickens introduced the "Pickens Plan," America still does not have a comprehensive national energy plan. Why, asks CBS News? Pickens has a one-word explanation: Washington. "You've got to change some things in Washington because what we're doing is wasting a hell of a lot time," Pickens told said in an interview that covered energy policy, OPEC and politics.

  • N.D. oil production tops 1 million-barrels-a-day milestone

    Published: Wed, Jun 18, 2014

    North Dakota has joined the big leagues of crude oil production, surpassing 1 million barrels per day — an output second only to Texas in the U.S., the Star Tribune reports

  • Gasoline at U.S. Pumps Set to Hit Six-Year Seasonal High

    Published: Wed, Jun 18, 2014

    Gasoline in the U.S. climbed this week, boosted by a surge in oil, and is expected to reach the highest level for this time of year since 2008. The pump price averaged $3.686 a gallon yesterday, up 1.2 cents from a week earlier, data posted on the Energy Information Administration’s website late yesterday show. Oil, which accounts for two-thirds of the retail price of gasoline, gained $2.49 a barrel on the New York Mercantile Exchange in the same period and $4.88 in the month ended yesterday.

  • Crude oil edges toward $107 after Iraq refinery attacked Futures Movers

    Published: Wed, Jun 18, 2014

    Crude-oil prices edged higher on Wednesday, with the U.S. benchmark pushing back toward $107 a barrel after militants in Iraq attacked the country's biggest oil refinery, underlining worries about potential threats to export facilities in the south. Nymex WTI crude oil for July delivery CLN4 -0.38% picked up 34 cents, or 0.4%, to $106.73 a barrel, partly recovering from a 54-cent loss on Tuesday. WTI crude is also taking a cue from expectations for tighter domestic supplies in the U.S.

  • Old friends face off in Oklahoma wind farm debate

    By CASEY SMITH, Tulsa World | Published: Sun, Jun 15, 2014

    Blue Mound is the highest point on Frank Robson’s Craig County cattle ranch and was once, he says, one of the highest points in the Cherokee Nation, Tulsa World reports.

  • Fracking wells possible culprit of Texas earthquakes

    Published: Sun, Jun 1, 2014

    RENO, Texas — The first time the earth shook their home, David and Meredith Hull thought it was a propane tank exploding outside, an odd but rare phenomenon, USA Today reports. Then it happened again. And again and again — more than 30 earthquakes since early November. One tremor tossed David Hull against the refrigerator and Meredith atop the stove. "It felt like something was under the house literally lifting it up and slamming it back down on its foundation," said David Hull, 60, a retired sheriff's deputy. "The whole house was shaking."

  • Sources: Ex-Chesapeake CEO near deal for Enduring Resources

    Published: Sat, May 10, 2014

    Former Chesapeake Energy Corp. CEO Aubrey McClendon is leading an investor group set to buy Enduring Resources LLC in a deal that could value the oil and natural gas producer at more than $2 billion, people familiar with the matter said on Friday, Reuters reported. McClendon, who was a major figure in the U.S. energy industry before being ousted from Chesapeake last year in the aftermath of a governance scandal and liquidity crisis, remains a prominent shale dealmaker who has amassed wells and leaseholds in the Utica. Denver, Colorado-headquartered Enduring Resources is partly owned by buyout firm EnCap Investments LP and has oil and gas producing operations in Utah and West Texas. The company has been working alongside Jefferies on its sale, the people said.

  • Head of Devon Energy's Canadian operations to step down

    Published: Sat, May 10, 2014

    The head of Devon Energy Corp.’s Canadian division is stepping down as the operation heads into its next phase following the sale of its conventional oil and gas assets in February, the Toronto Globe and Mail reports. Chris Seasons, who has been president of Devon Canada for the past decade, said he will leave the Oklahoma City-based company at the end of June. He will be replaced by Rob Dutton, who is now vice-president of capital projects.

  • Tulsa-based Williams closes Wyoming natural gas processing plant after explosion

    Published: Thu, Apr 24, 2014

    An explosion on Wednesday shut a natural gas-processing plant in Wyoming that can churn out about 2 percent of the daily U.S. gas supply, and a nearby town was evacuated though no injuries were reported, according to Reuters. The blast at the Williams Companies Inc plant in Opal, Wyoming, touched off a fire that was still burning several hours later, company spokeswoman Michele Swaner said.

  • What happens if the Keystone XL Pipeline isn't built?

    Published: Mon, Mar 24, 2014

    After five years, it appears the Obama administration will soon issue a decision on whether to build the long-delayed and controversial Keystone XL oil pipeline, which would cross an environmentally sensitive area of the Great Plains and move nearly a million gallons of oil a day to Gulf Coast refineries, reports NBC News. Backers of the project say it would stimulate the U.S. economy and enhance energy security, stressing that a new pipeline is the cheapest, safest way to transport dirty tar-sands crude from Canada’s booming oil fields to U.S. refineries. Environmentalists, who earlier this month chained themselves to the White House fence in protest, counter that it would endanger the water supply in several states and exacerbate climate change. They want to stop or slow the exploitation of an energy source the Sierra Club calls “the most toxic fossil fuel on the planet.” But what happens if, after all the shouting, the pipeline isn’t built?

  • SandRidge to let its oil leases expire on much of its acreage in Oklahoma, Kansas

    Published: Sat, Mar 22, 2014

    A lot of land will hit the oil-lease market this year, the Wichita Eagle reports. SandRidge Energy has said it will allow leases on about 700,000 gross acres of land in Kansas and Oklahoma to expire this year, and hundreds of thousands of acres more in 2015, 2016 and 2017. It said in a filing with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission last month that it has 1,026,000 gross acres set to expire this year in northern Oklahoma and southern and western Kansas. The company said it expects to hold on to about 30 percent of that by either paying to exercise the options or by holding them by producing oil and gas.

  • Rising energy demand a threat to strained water supplies, UN report says

    Published: Fri, Mar 21, 2014

    Rising demand for energy, from biofuels to shale gas, is a threat to freshwater supplies that are already under strain from climate change, the United Nations said in a report on Friday, according to Reuters. It urged energy companies to do more to limit use of water in everything from cooling coal-fired power plants to irrigation for crops grown to produce biofuels. "Demand for energy and freshwater will increase significantly in the coming decades," U.N. agencies said in the World Water Development Report. "This increase will present big challenges and strain resources in nearly all regions."

  • U.S. risks national blackout from small-scale attack

    Published: Thu, Mar 13, 2014

    The U.S. could suffer a coast-to-coast blackout if saboteurs knocked out nine of the country's 55,000 electric-transmission substations on a scorching summer day, according to a previously unreported federal analysis, the Wall Street Journal reports. The study by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission concluded that coordinated attacks in each of the nation's three separate electric systems could cause the entire power network to collapse, people familiar with the research said.

  • Chesapeake accused of underpaying gas royalties

    Published: Wed, Mar 12, 2014

    Some property owners in Pennsylvania, one of the states caught up in a natural-gas drilling boom, are accusing Chesapeake Energy of shortchanging them on royalty payments for pumping oil and gas from their land, the Wall Street Journal reports. The public outcry has grown so loud that Republican Gov. Tom Corbett, a longtime industry supporter who has received campaign contributions from the company, wrote an open letter last month asking the state attorney general to investigate. Chesapeake declined to comment on the royalty disputes, but said in a recent letter to the governor that it is abiding by the terms of its contracts with landowners.