• Nelson Bunker Hunt, second son of legendary wildcatter H.L. Hunt, dies

    Published: Wed, Oct 22, 2014

    Nelson Bunker Hunt, the wildcatter who surpassed the legacy of his father, H.L. Hunt, died Tuesday of congestive heart failure at a Dallas assisted living center, the Dallas Morning News reports. He was 88. Hunt outdid his father in creating and losing fortunes through titanic plays in oil, silver, soybeans, sugar beets, cattle and thoroughbred horses, his passion. “He was very smart, and he was willing to take a risk, because he could see the prospects of what it might make,” said his sister Caroline Rose Hunt. “I was fortunate enough to be invited by him to the Kentucky Derby and other big races. That was his love, horses.” A gambler and unabashed capitalist, Hunt lived for the big deal, plowing his oil profits into an array of ventures ranging from ancient Greek coins to the Shakey’s Pizza chain. And there was the Bronco Bowl bowling and entertainment complex in Dallas.

  • Private sector meteorology sees boost from energy companies

    Published: Tue, Oct 21, 2014

    When it comes to guessing the weather, energy companies are throwing less caution to the wind. Analysts and experts say energy companies are increasingly seeking out private firms to provide weather prediction models to inform their decision-making, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reports. The nation’s energy companies are among the major companies for the private sector meteorology industry, which could grow to $1.8 billion by 2020, according to a recent report from Dallas market research firm Markets and Markets. “Weather has become now the primary driver for commodity prices in energy,” said Paul Corby, senior vice president of energy for Planalytics, a Berwyn, Pa.-based firm in its third decade of providing “business weather intelligence” tailored to clients’ market needs and the commodities they sell. “It has an impact on

  • Oil CEO Dies in a Moscow Plane Crash

    Published: Tue, Oct 21, 2014

    The CEO of one the world's largest oil companies died in Moscow on Monday when his plane "collided with a snow-clearing machine," according to a spokesperson for Vnukovo Airport, NBC News reports. Christophe de Margerie, whose extravagant facial hair earned him the nickname "Big Mustache," according to Bloomberg News, spent seven years in charge of Total S.A., one of the world's six so-called super-major oil companies. He was 63. "I can confirm that the passenger was Total's head de Margerie,'' Elena Krylova, the airport spokesperson, told Reuters.




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