• CEO shares $27 million with staff after selling his firm

    Published: Wed, Jul 29, 2015

    This is what profit sharing should look like. The CEO and co-founder of a Turkish food delivery company has paid out $27 million to 114 employees after selling the firm. Nevzat Aydin told Turkish newspaper Hurriet his employees deserved to benefit from the sale. "If there is a success, we have accomplished it all together," he was quoted as saying.

  • WPX Energy CEO gives U.S. Senate hearing testimony supporting end of crude oil export ban

    BY CASEY SMITH, Tulsa World | Published: Tue, Jul 28, 2015

    WPX Energy President and CEO Rick Muncrief spoke Tuesday on Capitol Hill in Washington D.C., voicing the domestic oil and gas producer's "strong support" for lifting the United States government's four-decades old ban on the export of crude oil. Among other benefits, Muncrief said WPX Energy believes lifting the ban would boost the U.S. economy as well as strengthen the country's national security. Muncrief's testimony was part of a full committee hearing held by the United States Senate Committee on Banking, Housing, and Urban Affairs on "Lifting the Crude Oil Export Ban." The ban has been in place since the Energy Policy and Conservation Act became law in 1975.

  • With Wages Rising, The Fast Food Industry Plans Its Next Move

    Published: Tue, Jul 28, 2015

    Fast food companies have built their empires by paying workers the least that is legally required, often with an aim to keep their prices low. Now, around the country, the cost of doing business for these employers looks set to rise as lawmakers seriously consider minimum wages increases. What began as a small movement in New York in 2012 now has executives seriously considering how to manage higher pay. “We will work very, very aggressively with our franchisees to mitigate minimum wage” increases, Dunkin’ Brands CEO Nigel Travis told investors on an earnings call last week. “And we will continue to work with them to implement the best programs we can.”

  • Musk, Wozniak and Hawking urge ban on warfare AI and autonomous weapons

    Published: Mon, Jul 27, 2015

    Over 1,000 high-profile artificial intelligence experts and leading researchers have signed an open letter warning of a “military artificial intelligence arms race” and calling for a ban on “offensive autonomous weapons”. The letter, presented at the International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Buenos Aires, Argentina, was signed by Tesla’s Elon Musk, Apple co-founder Steve Wozniak, Google DeepMind chief executive Demis Hassabis and professor Stephen Hawking along with 1,000 AI and robotics researchers. The letter states: “AI technology has reached a point where the deployment of [autonomous weapons] is – practically if not legally – feasible within years, not decades, and the stakes are high: autonomous weapons have been described as the third revolution in warfare, after gunpowder and nuclear arms.”

  • Finally, a phone charger that turns your car into KITT from 'Knight Rider'

    Published: Mon, Jul 27, 2015

    We're still waiting for complex cars that can talk to us, but a cellphone charger will bring us much closer to that reality. Thanks to ThinkGeek, you can now have your very own KITT unit that also doubles as a USB car charger. It runs on a 12V vehicle power socket, aka a cigarette lighter, and once you’re plugged in you’ll be able to charge up to two products that use a USB cable. All you need is to provide the cable. When KITT is ready to go, he’ll chat up a storm with 11 different phrases from the original Knight Rider TV show—and he’s just as snarky as ever. Do we really need KITT as a charger? No, but we totally want it anyway. And at $29.99, it won't cost nearly as much as putting a real-life KITT in our cars.

  • 14 super-successful people share some of their biggest pet peeves

    Published: Mon, Jul 27, 2015

    Everyone has things that make them tick, and top leaders are no exception. (You can't stand people who loudly chew gum? You're in good company — neither can Oprah.) From half-baked ideas to working around the clock, we've collected the management pet peeves of 14 influential leaders. Most of these are smart things to avoid in general. Some are individual quirks. But one thing's for sure: If you ever happen to be discussing your future with Sheryl Sandberg, organizing a meeting with Jeff Bezos, or buying President Obama his trail mix, you'll know what to do.

  • The best music to listen to for optimal productivity, according to science

    Published: Mon, Jul 27, 2015

    Oftentimes we have innumerable distractions at work competing for our attention. Luckily, music can help put us back on a more productive track. Studies out of the University of Birmingham, England, show that music is effective in raising efficiency in repetitive work — so if you're mindlessly checking email or filling out a spreadsheet, adding some tunes will make your task go by that much faster.

  • 18 awesome career choices most college kids would never think of

    Published: Mon, Jul 27, 2015

    For many students, a college degree puts you on the direct path to a certain career, such as a doctor, teacher, or journalist. But for many others, the future isn't as clear-cut. Maybe you want to go to med school, but don't necessarily want to be a doctor. Maybe you love maps, but aren't sure how to incorporate that passion into a career. Or perhaps you just haven't found anything that sounds appealing yet.

  • Blue Bell Creameries hasn't set a date yet for resuming production in Broken Arrow

    FROM TULSA WORLD STAFF REPORTS | Published: Fri, Jul 24, 2015

    Blue Bell Creameries has started ice cream production trial runs in Alabama, but hasn't determined when it will begin production at its Broken Arrow plant. "We are making good progress on our facility in Broken Arrow, but have not confirmed a date to resume production," said Jenny Van Dorf, a public relations market specialist with Blue Bell Advertising Associates, in an email. Blue Bell Creameries has started ice cream production trial runs in Alabama three months after a listeria scare halted all sales. The Texas-based company said it's evaluating the enhanced production processes at its plant in Sylacauga, Alabama.Blue Bell Creameries has started ice cream production trial runs in Alabama, but hasn't determined when it will begin production at its Broken Arrow plant. "We are making good progress on our facility in Broken Arrow, but have not confirmed a date to resume production," said Jenny Van Dorf, a public relations market specialist with Blue Bell Advertising Associates, in an email. Blue Bell Creameries has started ice cream production trial runs in Alabama three months after a listeria scare halted all sales. The Texas-based company said it's evaluating the enhanced production processes at its plant in Sylacauga, Alabama.Blue Bell Creameries has started ice cream production trial runs in Alabama, but hasn't determined when it will begin production at its Broken Arrow plant. "We are making good progress on our facility in Broken Arrow, but have not confirmed a date to resume production," said Jenny Van Dorf, a public relations market specialist with Blue Bell Advertising Associates, in an email. Blue Bell Creameries has started ice cream production trial runs in Alabama three months after a listeria scare halted all sales. The Texas-based company said it's evaluating the enhanced production processes at its plant in Sylacauga, Alabama.

  • In Medicaid expansion states, some public hospitals find solid financial footing

    Published: Thu, Jul 23, 2015

    In states that have expanded their Medicaid programs, some large, public hospitals are finding themselves on solid financial footing for the first time in decades, and formerly uninsured patients are now getting regular care, Reuters reports. Nonprofit hospitals in the 30 states that expanded Medicaid reported on average 13 percent less bad debt from unpaid bills last year, according to Moody’s Investors Service. In contrast, according to Moody's, such "hospitals in non-expansion states saw bad debt increase through much of the year." Oklahoma is one of about 20 states that chose not to expand their Medicaid programs, a key provision of the Affordable Care Act, sometimes referred to as "Obamacare."  “From a global perspective, it seems like the Affordable Care Act is working,” Kevin Holloran, senior director at Standard & Poor’s, told Reuters. But in non-expansion states, like Georgia, “it’s really a neutral. It’s just the status quo.”

  • Millennials Who Are Thriving Financially Have One Thing in Common … Rich parents.

    Published: Thu, Jul 23, 2015

    Millions of America’s young people are really struggling financially. Around 30 percent are living with their parents, and many others are coping with stagnant wages, underemployment, and sky-high rent. And then there are those who are doing just great—owning a house, buying a car, and consistently putting money away for retirement. These, however, are not your run-of-the-mill Millennials. Nope. These Millennials have something very special: rich parents.

  • Abercrombie hijab lawsuit final chapter written

    BY BILL SHERMAN, Tulsa World | Published: Wed, Jul 22, 2015

    A lawsuit filed on behalf of a Tulsa Muslim woman against Abercrombie & Fitch is effectively over after the store dropped its appeal . The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission filed the suit in 2009 against Abercrombie & Fitch after the store’s Woodland Hills outlet refused to hire then teenager Samantha Elauf because she wears a religiously-mandated hijab, or head covering. The case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court, which ruled June 1 in Elauf’s favor, and sent it back to the 10th U.S. Court of Appeals in Denver for further resolution.

  • AT&T invents an absurd $15 activation fee for Next customers

    Published: Wed, Jul 22, 2015

    AT&T will soon increase its activation fees for customers on regular postpaid contracts and those new to the carrier's Next upgrade plan. Droid Life first reported the pending hikes, which will raise the activation fee for one- and two-year contracts to $45 — up from the current $40 — starting August 1st. $5 isn't a ton of money, but this is still the type of move that frustrates consumers and makes AT&T look awfully greedy. That $45 figure is now the highest activation fee among all US mobile providers. AT&T increased it from $35 to $40 last June, a move that Verizon Wireless later followed. But the worst change affects customers who sign up for AT&T's Next plan on or after August 1st. Like other carriers, AT&T's upgrade-when-you-want installment plan has allowed consumers to get started with $0 down and no hidden activation, financing, or upgrade fees. Unfortunately, that won't be the case much longer. Starting on the 1st, AT&T will charge all new Next customers a $15 activation fee whenever they get a new phone. That same $15 rate applies if you bring your own smartphone compatible with AT&T's network and start a new, contract-free line of service with the carrier. In a statement to The Verge, the company was quick to note that existing Next customers — and those who sign up before August 1st — won't be subject to the fees "at this time."

  • Hackers Remotely Kill a Jeep on the Highway—With Me in It

    Updated: Wed, Jul 22, 2015

    I was driving 70 mph on the edge of downtown St. Louis when the exploit began to take hold, says Andy Greenberg in Wired. Though I hadn’t touched the dashboard, the vents in the Jeep Cherokee started blasting cold air at the maximum setting, chilling the sweat on my back through the in-seat climate control system. Next the radio switched to the local hip hop station and began blaring Skee-lo at full volume. I spun the control knob left and hit the power button, to no avail. Then the windshield wipers turned on, and wiper fluid blurred the glass.

  • Target Under Fire for 'Objectifying' T-Shirt for Women

    Published: Wed, Jul 22, 2015

    This “Trophy” T-shirt, on sale at Target, has sparked an online backlash against the retailer, says Yahoo. The black shirt , which has the word “trophy” in bold white letters across the front and costs $12.99, has many slamming the retailer for treating women and girls as objects. A number of customers have been posting photos of the T-shirt, which some say they spotted in the junior’s section, on social media, publicly criticizing what they say is a sexist move on Target’s part.

  • Citi to pay $700M for deceptive credit card marketing

    Published: Tue, Jul 21, 2015

    Citibank and its subsidiaries Tuesday were ordered to pay $700 million in consumer relief for illegal practices related to credit card add-on products and services. A consent order issued by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau said about 7 million consumer accounts were affected between 2003 and 2012 by the bank's deceptive marketing of five debt protection products and additional add-ons that offered credit monitoring.

  • Florida gun store: We're a 'Muslim-free' zone after Chattanooga shootings

    Published: Tue, Jul 21, 2015

    IVERNESS, Fla. — A Florida gun store owner has announced that Muslims are now banned from his gun shop. Andy Hallinan, owner of Florida Gun Supply in Inverness, says that, effective immediately, his store is a “Muslim-free zone.” In a controversial video posted online, he speaks of the history of the Confederate flag and goes on to say, “Our leaders are telling you Islam is a peaceful religion full of tolerance and love and hope. Don’t believe their lies.” Hallinan stated that last week’s deadly shooting in Chattanooga, Tennessee, was the final straw for him.

  • Outlet mall zoning plans scrapped for Tulsa-area site

    BY JARREL WADE, Tulsa World | Published: Mon, Jul 20, 2015

    The plans to rezone private property near Turkey Mountain were officially taken off the table Monday morning, apparently locking in the developer's previously announced plans to build in Jenks.  Representatives of Simon Property Group had requested several delays for Tulsa Metropolitan Area Planning Commission meeting discussion on rezoning the property near Turkey Mountain.  TMAPC Chairman Michael Covey said the developer's attorney Louis Reynolds emailed commission members Monday morning, asking them to remove the zoning change from consideration.

  • Boeing's Seattle Seahawks-themed 747 is back for an encore

    Published: Mon, Jul 20, 2015

    It's the second time in as many years that a 747-8 Freighter gets the Seattle treatment, says USA Today. Boeing's first Seahawks 747  rolled out in January 2014 to help celebrate the team's National Football Conference Championship and appearance in Super Bowl XLVIII.

  • WPX Energy makes $2.75 billion move into oil-rich Permian Basin

    BY ROD WALTON, Tulsa World | Published: Wed, Jul 15, 2015

    Tulsa-based WPX Energy Inc., which has been remaking itself from a natural gas firm to more of an oil producer, took a big leap in that direction by announcing a $2.75 billion acquisition in the Permian Basin of west Texas and eastern New Mexico. The announcement Tuesday indicated that WPX is acquiring RKI Exploration and Production LLC for $2.35 billion plus assumption of $400 million in debt. The move taps WPX into 92,000 net acres and an average 22,000 barrels of oil equivalent per day in existing production — half of that in oil. The buy also expands WPX’s strategic focus to four basins in the western U.S. The others are the Williston in North Dakota, the Piceance in Colorado and the San Juan in New Mexico. The company has been working to divest itself from holdings in the natural gas-rich Marcellus Shale of the eastern U.S.




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