• The ties that bind: National Cowboy Museum exhibit in Oklahoma City explores the art and history of bolo ties

    By Brandy McDonnell Features Writer bmcdonnell@oklahoman.com  | Updated: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    For such a simple, distinctly Western adornment, the bolo tie — a length of braided leather or cord decorated with metal tips and fastened with an ornamental clasp or slide — has become not only a fashion accessory with international appeal but also a clever canvas for many skilled artists. Starting Friday, about 370 bolo ties and materials associated with them will be featured at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in “Native American Bolo Ties: Vintage and Contemporary Artistry,” a traveling exhibition organized by Sandfield and the Heard Museum in Phoenix.

  • University of Oklahoma School of Dance to host Dance Partners event

    From Staff Reports  | Published: Thu, Feb 4, 2016

    The University of Oklahoma School of Dance will host a meeting and presentations for Dance Partners, the primary external support group for the school, on Feb. 11. The event will celebrate Raul Raimondo Rebeck, the 2016 Susan E. Brackett Distinguished Visiting Artist Chair.

  • Glitter, feathers, paint: New Orleans preps for Mardi Gras

    Updated: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — It's glitter season in New Orleans. A time for feathers, paper mache, sequins, paint, bailing wire, bones, and just about any other item that can be used for decoration. Across garages, kitchen tables and warehouses, residents are feverishly sewing elaborate costumes, painting floats and decorating custom throws. Outside of New Orleans, Mardi Gras has often been perceived as a raucous time of drinking too much beer, throwing beads and nudity. But to those who live here and essentially put on the show for the world, it's a wildly creative time of personal expression, rich history and family fun. Behind the parades and pageantry are regular citizens who spend all year and often a lot of their own money to transfo

  • Meet a 'living, breathing' historical figure as James Madison portrayer visits Oklahoma City

    By Matthew Price Features Editor  mprice@oklahoman.com  | Published: Wed, Feb 3, 2016

    The age of the brainy hero has arrived, says Bryan Austin, who portrays fourth president James Madison while representing the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation in Williamsburg, Va., and around the world. Austin will be in Oklahoma City on Thursday for a living history performance at the Oklahoma History Center.

  • Serenity Now: Austin's Elisabet Ney Museum evokes a past era

    Updated: Tue, Feb 2, 2016

    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Four miles from the bustling state capitol, a castle-like structure sits in a corner of Austin's Hyde Park neighborhood. It's built from white stones, complete with columns and a square tower. Out front, a field of native greenery teeming with tall purple and yellow wildflowers seems to have been lifted from the Texas plains and left to grow as nature intended. This is the Elisabet Ney Museum, a historic site housing works by Ney, a celebrated German sculptor. Ney and her physician-philosopher husband, Edmund Montgomery, left Europe amid political turmoil in 1871 and decided to come to Texas. She established her studio and home here in 1892, naming the site Formosa, Portuguese for beautiful.

  • OSHA cites 'Texas' producers over deadly fireworks blast

    Updated: Tue, Feb 2, 2016

    PALO DURO CANYON STATE PARK, Texas (AP) — Federal officials have issued citations against a group that puts on the outdoor musical "Texas" after a stage manager was killed last summer when two containers of fireworks exploded at the production venue in Palo Duro Canyon. The U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration announced the citations, issued Jan. 28, on Tuesday. OSHA says the Texas Panhandle Heritage Foundation Inc. failed to train workers on the use of explosives, provide fire-retardant clothing, perform a hazard assessment and develop a written hazard communication program. OSHA proposes $42,000 in penalties.

  • Frida Kahlo exhibition opens in Russian museum

    Updated: Tue, Feb 2, 2016

    ST. PETERSBURG, Russia (AP) — Russia's first major exhibition dedicated to Mexican surrealist painter Frida Kahlo has opened in a St. Petersburg museum. The exhibition that opened Tuesday in the Faberge Museum features three dozen works by Kahlo, famous for her poignant self-portraits. The paintings come from various collections in Mexico, and officials said it took four separate planes to transport them to Russia because of safety precautions. The organizers said the exhibition spans the entire Kahlo's career and includes some of her most iconic paintings.

  • Kansas City museum learns it has a real Hieronymus Bosch

    Updated: Tue, Feb 2, 2016

    The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Missouri, has learned that a 16th century oil-wood panel the museum owns was painted by the Dutch artist Hieronymus Bosch. The work, "The Temptation of St. Anthony," was previously attributed to the artist's workshop. The piece is on loan to the Het Noordbrabents Museum in Den Bosch, The Netherlands, which is Bosch's hometown, for an exhibition opening Feb. 13. The show in Holland marks 500 years since Bosch's death in 1516. The attribution of the work was made by the Bosch Research and Conservation Project, which sent a team to Kansas City to study the painting and concluded that it could "be ascribed to Bosch with confidence." There are only about 25 paintings — includ

  • Nature camps aim to draw kids from screens to the outdoors

    Updated: Tue, Feb 2, 2016

    In this age of screens and busy schedules, nature day camps are in demand, and many offer a more diverse array of experiences than parents probably realize. "Offering children direct contact with nature — getting their feet wet and hands muddy — should be at the top of the list of vital camp experiences," says Richard Louv, author of "Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder" (Algonquin Books, 2008). His writings are cited by many nature camp directors as inspiring their work. Nature-oriented day camps are held in county parks, private preserves, botanical gardens and other green places across the country.

  • Allied Arts Month proclaimed in Oklahoma City

    FROM STAFF REPORTS | Published: Tue, Feb 2, 2016

    This is the 45th anniversary of Allied Arts. The nonprofit supporting artistic ventures in the greater Oklahoma City area will strive to raise $3.25 million for the local arts community through its annual fundraising campaign.

  • Five soloists showcase musical theater tunes in Oklahoma City Philharmonic concert

    By Rick Rogers For The Oklahoman | Published: Tue, Feb 2, 2016

    The Oklahoma City Philharmonic’s recent pops concert celebrated the musicals of Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schonberg.

  • Travel now: Hieronymus Bosch; Epcot flower fest; Kengo Kuma

    Updated: Mon, Feb 1, 2016

    NELSON-ATKINS HAS A REAL HIERONYMUS BOSCH The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City, Missouri, has learned that a 16th century oil-wood panel the museum owns was painted by the Dutch artist Hieronymus Bosch. The work, "The Temptation of St. Anthony," was previously attributed to the artist's workshop. The piece is on loan to the Het Noordbrabents Museum in Den Bosch, The Netherlands, which is Bosch's hometown, for an exhibition opening Feb. 13. The show in Holland marks 500 years since Bosch's death in 1516. The attribution of the work was made by the Bosch Research and Conservation Project, which sent a team to Kansas City to study the painting and concluded that it could "be ascribed to Bosch with confidence.

  • DIA welcomes millionth local visitor since millage passage

    Updated: Mon, Feb 1, 2016

    DETROIT (AP) — One million people from Wayne, Oakland and Macomb counties have visited the Detroit Institute of Arts since a special millage providing funds for the museum's operations was passed. The museum in Detroit's Midtown announced the attendance milestone Monday and says it represents $5.7 million in admission value to area residents. Voters in the three counties approved a yearly $23 million property tax millage in 2012 to fund DIA operations for 10 years. Residents receive complimentary general admission to the museum. Adult general admission is $12.50 for nonresidents. The museum was funded by the city until the 1970s, when state support replaced local funding. That backing eventually disappeared.

  • Book illustrator's art poster appearing in NYC subway system

    Updated: Mon, Feb 1, 2016

    NEW YORK (AP) — An art poster created by a children's book author and illustrator for the subway system celebrates New York City's voices and music. Ashley Bryan's "New York Voices" was selected as part of the MTA's Arts & Design graphic arts poster program. The 92-year-old artist's poster depicts two groups of singers with their arms linked and their mouths open in mid-song. He says "the spirt of the voice harmonizes the city." The posters will be installed in hundreds of subway stations and cars and available for purchase at the Transit Museum. The Bronx-born artist who lives in Maine is known for work highlighting the African-American experience. His books include "Sail Away" and "Beautiful Blackb

  • Chinese artist imitates photo of Syrian toddler on the beach

    Updated: Mon, Feb 1, 2016

    NEW DELHI (AP) — Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei has recreated the famous image of a 3-year-old Syrian child who drowned in Turkey last year by staging a photo of himself lying face down on a beach in Greece. The photograph last year of the child lying on a Turkish beach triggered international outrage as people saw the helpless toddler as the devastating human face of the refugee crisis in Europe. Ai posed last week on a pebbly beach on Lesbos island for the picture for one of India's largest English-language news magazines, India Today. Rohit Chawla, the magazine's photographer and visual director, traveled to Lesbos to take the picture. The photograph was displayed at an art fair in New Delhi over the w

  • NYC jury hears details of modern masters forgery scandal

    Updated: Mon, Feb 1, 2016

    NEW YORK (AP) — A New York City jury is hearing about a scandal in the art world that featured a Chinese immigrant who forged fakes of modern masters in his garage. The civil trial stems from a lawsuit brought by Domenico De Sole, the chairman of the board at Sotheby's auction house. He and his wife have accused a Manhattan gallery of selling them a phony Mark Rothko painting for more than $8 million in 2004. A former gallery director bought the fake painting from an art dealer who has pleaded guilty in a separate criminal case. The De Soles are seeking $25 million in damages, claiming the dealer should have known the work was phony. Defense attorney say the forgeries the Chinese painter created for the crooked dealer

  • AP-IN--Indiana News Digest at 12 am, IN

    Updated: Mon, Feb 1, 2016

    Here's a look at AP's Indiana news coverage at midnight. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP-Indianapolis bureau at 317-639-5501, 800-382-1582 or indy@ap.org. Caryn Rousseau is on the desk. All times EST. A reminder: This information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date. All times are Eastern. Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

  • Minot State art professor to lead students on trip to China

    Updated: Sun, Jan 31, 2016

    MINOT, N.D. (AP) — A Minot State University art professor will lead students and North Dakotans on a trip to China this summer to study the country's history of ceramics. The Bismarck Tribune reports (http://bit.ly/1Sg2zeJ ) the 15-day tour will trace the development of ceramics through five cities in China. Professor Linda Olson will lead the program. Starting June 6, the group will visit museums, ancient kiln sites and will also get to see the infamous Terracotta Army. Olson says the country has deep roots in ceramics and that the art form in the country has developed to an "incredible level." The five cities the group will travel to are: Shanghai, Longquan, Jingdezhen, Xian and Beijing.

  • Oklahoma City-area features briefs for Jan. 31

    FROM STAFF REPORTS | Published: Sun, Jan 31, 2016

    Oklahoma City-area features briefs for Jan. 31

  • Former Oklahoma City Philharmonic conductor returns to city for classics concert

    BY RICK ROGERS For The Oklahoman | Published: Sun, Jan 31, 2016

    Robert Moody, conductor of the Oklahoma City Philharmonic’s Discovery Family Series and youth concerts from 1999 to 2009, returns to Oklahoma this week to lead the orchestra in a classics concert titled “Symphonie Fantastique!”




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