• Gas tax increase gains momentum in Washington Legislature

    Updated: Sun, Jun 28, 2015

    OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — House and Senate transportation leaders said Sunday that they have finalized details of a multi-billion dollar transportation revenue package that includes an incremental increase in the gas tax. Democratic House Transportation Chairwoman Judy Clibborn and Republican Sen. Joe Fain, vice chair of the Senate Transportation Committee, both said that negotiations were now done. Clibborn said that the last meeting over the package was completed early Sunday afternoon, and that lawmakers would be briefed before full details would be released publicly. The headway in negotiations between the chambers came after Gov.

  • The Latest: No bank withdrawal limits on foreign cards

    Updated: Sun, Jun 28, 2015

    ATHENS, Greece (AP) — The latest developments on Greece's bailout negotiations (all times local): ___ 3:15 a.m. A decree on banking controls has been published in the official Government Gazette stating banks will not open Monday and will stay shut through Monday, July 6. Greece could shorten or lengthen this period. ATMs are set to reopen early Monday afternoon at the latest. Even then, withdrawals are limited to 60 euros ($66) per day. Visitors and other holders of credit and cash issued abroad are exempt from the restrictions. Anxious tourists had been spotted queuing at ATMs Sunday, thinking the restrictions, which had been known but not yet specified, would apply to them.

  • SpaceX rocket destroyed on way to space station, cargo lost

    Updated: Sun, Jun 28, 2015

    An unmanned SpaceX rocket carrying supplies to the International Space Station broke apart Sunday shortly after liftoff. It was a severe blow to NASA, the third cargo mission to fail in eight months. The accident happened about 2½ minutes into the flight from Cape Canaveral, Florida. A billowing white cloud emerged in the sky, growing bigger and bigger, then fiery plumes shot out. Pieces of the rocket could be seen falling into the Atlantic like a fireworks display gone wrong. More than 5,200 pounds of space station cargo were on board, including the first docking port designed for future commercial crew capsules, a new spacesuit and a water filtration system.

  • Fighting for Idaho's anadromous fish

    Updated: Sun, Jun 28, 2015

    SUNBEAM, Idaho (AP) — Driving along the Yankee Fork of the Salmon River you see two worlds. One is a pristine wild land with tall trees and mountain goats scampering along ridge lines. But a quick glance in another direction reveals dredge tailings, a straight-channel riverbed, preserved ghost towns showing the area's mining history and a massive 988-ton dredge rusting in a pool of cloudy blue water. Billy Reed, a volunteer with the Yankee Fork Gold Dredge Association, said the dredge brought 35 temporary jobs to the area during the five-month period when the dredge was constructed. During operation, the outfit employed 15 men, he said. The economic impact on the area was not significant, Reed said.

  • Deed would keep Trump Plaza shut for at least 10 years

    Updated: Sun, Jun 28, 2015

    ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — The owners of Atlantic City's former Trump Plaza casino plan to keep it shut for at least 10 years as a tax-saving measure. Trump Entertainment Resorts has filed a deed restriction for the casino, which closed last September, preventing it from being used again as a casino for at least a decade. It could still be used for another purpose. The move was done to avoid potentially higher taxes under a bill Gov. Chris Christie could sign soon allowing casinos to make payments in lieu of taxes for 15 years as part of an Atlantic City rescue plan. The bill applies to any property that was licensed to operate as a casino in 2014 and that does not have a deed restriction.

  • Armenia police order protesters to disperse

    Updated: Sun, Jun 28, 2015

    YEREVAN, Armenia (AP) — Police in Armenia's capital on Sunday ordered thousands of demonstrators to disperse, moving to end a protest against higher electricity rates that has blocked a main avenue in Yerevan for nearly a week. Some protesters obeyed and left for a nearby square, but thousands remained on the street after dark in defiance of both the police and the main protest organizers. Riot police lined up across the road banged their truncheons against their shields in warning, but made no immediate move. Behind them stood water cannons and armored vehicles.

  • Survey: US gasoline prices down 2 cents in the past 2 weeks

    Updated: Sun, Jun 28, 2015

    CAMARILLO, Calif. (AP) — The average price of gasoline has dropped 2 cents over the past two weeks to $2.85 a gallon. Industry analyst Trilby Lundberg said Sunday that the decline comes amid a 42-cent jump recorded over the previous nine weeks. The average national price for midgrade gas was $3.05, with premium going for $3.23. The highest price recorded in the continental United States was $3.52 a gallon in San Diego. The cheapest was $2.44 a gallon in Jackson, Mississippi. The price of diesel also was down 2 cents over the same period to $2.94 a gallon.

  • 'Ted 2' lags behind 'Jurassic World,' 'Inside Out'

    Updated: Sun, Jun 28, 2015

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — A foul-mouthed Teddy bear is no match for a pack of dinosaurs. Seth MacFarlane's "Ted 2" opened far under expectations with $32.9 million, according to Rentrak estimates Sunday, ceding the top two spots to holdovers "Jurassic World" and "Inside Out." While $32.9 million is a solid opening for an R-rated comedy, bigger things were expected from "Ted 2," which cost a reported $68 million to produce. The Universal Pictures sequel was expected to earn somewhere in the $50 million range going into its debut weekend, thanks to the record-setting precedent of the first film, which earned $54.4 million in 2012. In addition to mediocre reviews, perhaps the initial intrigue around a raunchy stuffed anim

  • Michigan utilities work to comply with air pollution rule

    Updated: Sun, Jun 28, 2015

    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — The U.S. Supreme Court is expected to release a decision this week about new mercury and toxic air emissions standards for power plants, but Michigan's utility companies have already been working toward compliance. The case against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is led by Michigan, which was joined by 20 other states. The justices will take the bench again Monday to hand down more opinions. They should finish their work early in the week. In rare instances, the court will put off decisions and order a case to be argued again in the next term.

  • Swedish woman's Wall Street dream led to $850M lawsuit

    Updated: Sun, Jun 28, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — A jury is deliberating the merits of an $850 million lawsuit that a young Swedish woman brought against her former Wall Street boss over claims of a sexual relationship turned sour. Hanna Bouveng claims Benjamin Wey used his power as owner of New York Global Group to coerce her into four sexual encounters before firing her after discovering she had a boyfriend. She says he then launched a smear campaign through the Internet, depicting her falsely as a prostitute, extortionist or drug user, and wrote vicious emails to her friends and family. He testified that he never had sex with her and that she squandered a golden opportunity to make it on Wall Street by embracing a New York nightclub scene that left her t

  • In Massachusetts, groups push to bolster solar panel program

    Updated: Sun, Jun 28, 2015

    BOSTON (AP) — Environmentalists are pressing Massachusetts lawmakers to lift what they call arbitrary limits on a key program designed to encourage solar panel use in the state. The so-called "net-metering" program allows homeowners, businesses and local governments to sell excess solar power they generate back to the grid in exchange for credit on their bills. Renewable energy advocates say 171 communities across the state have already reached the cap, slowing the state's efforts to reach its goal of 1,600 megawatts of installed solar capacity by 2020. While individual homeowners are exempt, the cap is making it harder for some larger projects to get off the ground. Gov.

  • Coroner: Coal miner killed in accident; autopsy pending

    Updated: Sun, Jun 28, 2015

    MOUNT MORRIS, Pa. (AP) — Authorities say a coal miner was killed over the weekend in an accident at a mine in southwestern Pennsylvania. The Green County coroner's office says 55-year-old John Kelly of Albright, West Virginia died shortly after 1:30 a.m. Sunday in the emergency room at Southwest Regional Medical Center. Authorities said Kelly had been injured while working at a mine in Mount Morris. The coroner's office said preliminary information indicates that he was injured by "some type of air shaft/mine door coming down upon him." The cause and manner of death are pending a final autopsy.

  • Germany's oldest remaining nuclear plant shuts down

    Updated: Sun, Jun 28, 2015

    BERLIN (AP) — Germany's oldest remaining nuclear reactor has been shut down, part of a move initiated four years ago to switch off all its nuclear plants by the end of 2022. The Grafenrheinfeld reactor in the southern state of Bavaria was taken offline as scheduled overnight, authorities and operator E.ON said Sunday. Grafenrheinfeld went into service in 1981. It is the first reactor to close since Germany switched off the oldest eight of its 17 nuclear reactors in 2011, just after Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant disaster. The next to close will be one of two reactors at the Gundremmingen plant in Bavaria, which is set to shut by the end of 2017. The rest will be closed by the end of 2022.

  • Time to change the subject in America's health care debate?

    Updated: Sun, Jun 28, 2015

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Now that the Supreme Court has upheld President Barack Obama's law yet again, the country finally has an opportunity to change the subject on health care. There's no shortage of pressing issues, including prescription drug prices, high insurance deductibles and long-term care. But moving on will take time. That's partly because many Republicans want another chance to repeal the Affordable Care Act if they win the White House and both chambers of Congress next year. It's also difficult to start new conversations when political divisions are so raw. Also, there's a big gap between what people perceive as problems and the priorities of policymakers, business and the health care industry. Dem

  • Investigators at Alaska site of plane crash that killed 9

    Updated: Sat, Jun 27, 2015

    JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — A team of aviation investigators is now working in a remote, mountainous site in southeast Alaska to determine what caused the crash of a sightseeing plane that killed eight cruise ship passengers and the aircraft's pilot. The DeHavilland DHC-3 Otter turboprop — also known as a floatplane — went down Thursday. The excursion was sold through the cruise company Holland America. Seven investigators with the National Transportation Safety Board made it to the crash site on Saturday morning and are spending the day scouring for clues to the disaster, said Clint Johnson, head of the board's Alaska office.

  • Armenian president suspends electricity hikes behind protest

    Updated: Sat, Jun 27, 2015

    YEREVAN, Armenia (AP) — The president of Armenia on Saturday suspended hikes in household electricity rates in an effort to end the protests that have blocked the capital's main avenue for six straight days. The demonstrators, however, didn't disperse. President Serzh Sargsyan said the government would bear the burden of the higher electricity costs until an audit of the Russian-owned power company could be completed. At least some of the money appeared to be coming from Moscow, where the protests have caused great concern. Some of the protest organizers called for demonstrators to remain on the street until the rate hikes were completely annulled, but they said the decision on whether to continue the protest would be made

  • Kohl's, California prosecutors reach nearly $1M settlement

    Updated: Sat, Jun 27, 2015

    SANTA CRUZ, Calif. (AP) — Kohl's has reached a nearly $1 million settlement with prosecutors in four California counties who alleged some of the Wisconsin-based company's department stores charged customers more than the price advertised on shelves and signs. The Riverside County District Attorney's Office announced the settlement on Friday. Prosecutors in Riverside, Fresno, Santa Cruz and Shasta counties had sued Kohl's, claiming it overcharged customers and failed to adequately disclose information about its "Kohl's Cash" promotion. After-hours emails to Kohl's representatives were not immediately returned.

  • Your face on your espresso? Highlights from tech show

    Updated: Sat, Jun 27, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — Imagine staring deep into the foam of your favorite espresso drink and seeing a face looking back at you. Or how about using the charge in your fingers to clean your teeth? At the CE Week gadget show in New York this week, there were several standouts amid the sea of smartphone chargers and 3-D printers. Some are set to hit stores near you in the not-too-distant future. Here's a look at some of the more fun and fabulous items on display: ___ LUFTHANSA LATTES Ripples combines 3-D and ink-jet printer technologies to paint a picture on top of any foam-covered drink using coffee extract. Baristas can choose a pre-loaded design or upload their own over Wi-Fi, such as a picture of the person rece

  • Critics: Dominion Virginia jumping gun on coal ash cleanup

    Updated: Sat, Jun 27, 2015

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Environmental and water protection groups say Dominion Virginia Power is jumping the gun on the closure of coal ash impoundments at a northern Virginia power plant and they're asking state and federal regulators to step in. The power company has taken the initial steps to move more than 1 million cubic yards of coal ash into one impoundment at the Possum Point Power Station. That would consolidate five coal ash ponds, some dating to the 1940s and dormant since the 1960s. But critics argue that plan is inadequate, leaving a huge amount of coal ash to potentially leach into Quantico Creek, which drains into the Potomac River.

  • New laws enacted in Idaho starting July 1

    Updated: Sat, Jun 27, 2015

    BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Starting July 1, Idahoans will see new laws that range from how much they pay at the gas station to giving teachers a pay bump. Next week marks the start of a new fiscal year in Idaho. This means a $95 million transportation plan designed to help repair Idaho's crumbling bridges and roads will go into effect. For Idaho residents, vehicle registration fees are going up $21 and gas will cost 7 cents more because of higher taxes. For education, rookie teacher salaries will be boosted by almost $1,000 up to $32,700 per year as part of a sweeping plan to increase teacher pay over the next five years. And the Idaho giant salamander will become the state's official state amphibian.




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