• Switzerland EU United Nations Zika

    Yesterday

    Marie-Paule Kieny, Assistant Director-General, Health Systems and Innovation, of World Health Organization, WHO, speaks during a press conference at the European headquarters of the United Nations, in Geneva, Switzerland, on Friday, Feb. 12, 2016. The World Health Organization says possible Zika vaccines are at least 18 months away from large-scale trials. WHO assistant director-general for health systems and innovation Marie-Paule Kieny says the U.N. health agency's response is "proceeding very quickly" and 15 companies or groups have been identified as possible participants in the hunt for vaccines.

  • More tech companies choose Kansas City's Crossroads and land funding

    Yesterday

    A San Francisco Bay company, Pramata, has opened an office in the Crossroads Arts District, the latest to be attracted to Kansas City’s growing tech community. Pramata, which uses advanced data analysis to help businesses attract and keep customers, will bring 15 jobs to the area, said CEO and co-founder Praful Saklani. He was in town Thursday for the announcement, along with . Nixon also announced that , another company with a new Crossroads office, will receive a second $250,000 grant from the Missouri Technology Corp. to support its expansion in Kansas City. LaunchCode, a nonprofit started in St. Louis that helps train tech talent and match it with internships and job openings, got a similar grant last year to star

  • Uber to pay $28.5M to settle safety ad lawsuits

    Updated: Thu, Feb 11, 2016

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Uber said Thursday that it will pay $28.5 million to settle two lawsuits that said the ride-hailing firm misled customers about its safety procedures and fees. The company told a federal judge in San Francisco that it wants to settle the class-action lawsuits by paying about 25 million riders who made U.S. trips between Jan. 1, 2013, and Jan. 31, 2016. The judge must still approve the deal. "We are glad to put these cases behind us and we will continue to invest in new technology and great customer services so that we can help improve safety in the cities we serve," the San Francisco-based company said in a statement. The lawsuits attacked Uber for charging a fee of up to $2.

  • House committee passes bill to privatize air traffic control

    Updated: Thu, Feb 11, 2016

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A Republican-controlled House committee on Thursday endorsed a bill that would wrest responsibility for running the nation's air traffic control system from the government and turn it over to a private, nonprofit corporation run by airlines and other aviation interests. The House Transportation and Infrastructure Committee approved the measure on a mostly party-line vote of 32-26 over the objections of Democrats, who called it a giveaway to the airlines that are providing the political muscle behind the bill. The bill reauthorizes the Federal Aviation Administration and sets aviation policy for six years. The panel's chairman and the bill's chief sponsor, Rep. Bill Shuster, R-Pa.

  • Colorado Springs defense contractor Imprimis announces agreement to result in 25-35 hires

    Updated: Thu, Feb 11, 2016

    Colorado Springs defense contractor Imprimis Inc. has received a research contract from the Digital Manufacturing and Design Innovation Institute in Chicago to adapt Department of Defense cybersecurity standards for and expand their use by manufacturers, suppliers and other vendors nationwide. Imprimis and subcontractors Spire Manufacturing Solutions and Western Cyber Exchange, which both also are based in the Springs, plan to hire between 25 and 35 employees locally and in Chicago to complete the one-year project, said Mike Semmens, cofounder and principal of Imprimis. He declined to disclose the size of the contract, but said the value was less than $1 million.

  • Tesla

    Updated: Thu, Feb 11, 2016

    The new Tesla gallery will open in Fort Worth Friday, Feb. 12, 2016. Test dives will be available by appointment only. Customers custom-order their electric vehicle online, with exactly the features they want.

  • NY to require manufacturers to pay for fouled water cleanup

    Updated: Thu, Feb 11, 2016

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Two industrial companies will be held liable for the cleanup of a toxic chemical that found its way into an upstate New York village's drinking water, the acting state environmental commissioner said Thursday. The Department of Environmental Conservation sent a letter to New Jersey-based Honeywell International and Saint-Gobain Performance Plastics, part of a Paris-based global conglomerate, demanding that they enter into binding consent orders to finance a state Superfund cleanup launched four weeks ago in Hoosick Falls, a small village on the Vermont border. The agency said other companies may be identified later and held liable.

  • Japan stock index down more than 5 percent

    Updated: Thu, Feb 11, 2016

    TOKYO (AP) — Japan's benchmark stock index dived more than 5 percent Friday following a sell-off in European and U.S. markets. The Nikkei 225 was down 5.3 percent at 14,876.64. Other Asian stock markets were also lower but less dramatically.

  • Transparency debate follows vote by California coastal panel

    Updated: Thu, Feb 11, 2016

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — The agency that decides what gets built and where along the California coast is facing questions about transparency after it pushed out its top executive in a closed-door vote and without a clear explanation of why the change was being made. Executive Director Charles Lester was dismissed on a 7-5 tally Wednesday night, which was announced after the commission listened to hours of testimony from dozens of witnesses, virtually all of it extolling Lester's work and commitment to a coastline open for all. Former Commissioner Steve Blank, who was viewed as an environmental advocate while on the panel and resigned in 2013, said he was astonished by the commission's decision to take a vote in private on the clo

  • Illinois residents weigh in on proposed coal mine expansion

    Updated: Thu, Feb 11, 2016

    HILLSBORO, Ill. (AP) — Some central Illinois residents are asking state regulators to reject a proposed expansion of a coal mine where an underground fire has smoldered for nearly a year. Opponents of Foresight Energy's planned Deer Run Mine expansion testified at a Thursday public hearing in Hillsboro that the company's inability to quell the ongoing fire should lead the Illinois Department of Natural Resources to deny the request. The St. Louis-based company ceased mine production in early January because of the elevated carbon monoxide levels below ground as well a depressed market. It also responded by cutting 100 jobs and says it's uncertain when — or if — production will resume.

  • Pandora CEO declines comment on sale report, shares recede

    Updated: Thu, Feb 11, 2016

    OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Pandora Media's stock retreated in after-hours trading Thursday after the Internet radio giant's fourth-quarter earnings fell short of expectations and its CEO declined to comment on a report that the company is looking to sell itself. Pandora's stock jumped earlier in the day after The New York Times reported the company is working with Morgan Stanley to meet potential buyers. The report cited people who requested anonymity who had been briefed in the talks, which were described as preliminary. CEO Brian McAndrews declined to comment on the report when asked in a conference call following the company's quarterly earnings report. "It's a short and easy answer: We won't comment," McAndrews said.

  • Massive gas leak near Los Angeles plugged after 16 weeks

    Updated: Thu, Feb 11, 2016

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — A blowout at a natural gas well that leaked uncontrollably for 16 weeks and drove thousands of residents from their Los Angeles homes was plugged Thursday, a utility said. While the well still needs to be permanently sealed with cement and inspected by state regulators, the announcement by Southern California Gas Co. marked the first time the massive leak has been under control since it was reported Oct. 23. "We've achieved control of the well today," said Jimmie Cho, a SoCalGas senior vice president. He said he was very confident they would complete the job. The leak is expected to cost the company, a division of Sempra Energy, $250 million to $300 million, according to a filing with the Securities

  • Standoff over guns at Tennessee legislative office complex

    Updated: Thu, Feb 11, 2016

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — If it's up to the Republican speakers of the state House and Senate, the more than half-million Tennesseans with permits will soon be able to carry guns inside the legislative office complex. The proposal announced Thursday comes as lawmakers in Arizona, Florida and Wyoming are also considering loosening gun restrictions at their statehouses this year. But Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's administration is raising concerns about the proposed change in Tennessee. Haslam said in an interview with The Associated Press on Thursday that he wants to keep the gun ban within the state Capitol building, which is connected to the Legislative Plaza via an underground tunnel. "We don't think that people shoul

  • New Mexico braces for budget crunch linked to oil prices

    Updated: Thu, Feb 11, 2016

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — The chairman of New Mexico's Senate Finance Committee warned Thursday that the state could be short on revenue by $700 million or more during the current fiscal year because of reduced income from oil and gas production and anemic corporate and sales tax receipts. The outlook from Sen. John Arthur Smith, D-Deming, for the budget year ending in June represents a sharp shift from recent forecasts. In January, the state anticipated a $145 million revenue shortfall. New Mexico ended the last fiscal year with $713 million in general fund reserves — a buffer equal to nearly 12 percent of annual general fund spending.

  • Tesla Gallery opens Friday to show electric cars in Fort Worth

    Updated: Thu, Feb 11, 2016

    Fort Worth motorists in the market for a luxury electric vehicle no longer have to drive all the way to Dallas for a peek at a Tesla. Instead, they now have a Tesla Gallery of their own. The tradition-busting car manufacturer on Friday is scheduled to celebrate the grand opening of its newest gallery at . The store, which opens at 10 a.m., is in the University Park Village shopping center, just northeast of Colonial Country Club. Prospective customers can learn about the $70,000-plus, cutting-edge vehicles by talking with Tesla associates on-site, or by viewing the many educational displays. Test drives are by appointment only, but no sales are allowed because the direct-sale company does not have dealerships.

  • Group questions Peabody Energy's coal mine self-bonding

    Updated: Thu, Feb 11, 2016

    CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — An environmental group is formally questioning Peabody Energy's ability to fully bond its coal mines in Wyoming and elsewhere in the Rocky Mountain region, saying the St. Louis-based company has insufficient funding to qualify for self-bonding. Bonding helps ensure funding is in place to fill in mines that close and restore them to a natural state. Self-bonding exempts companies from posting conventional bond in exchange for showing they have sufficient resources to pay for all potential mine reclamation. St. Louis-based Peabody has almost $900 million in self-bonding obligations in Wyoming. They cover three big open-pit mines in the Powder River Basin, a region that supplies almost 40 percent of the n

  • Ex-exec sentenced to 1 month in West Virginia chemical spill

    Updated: Thu, Feb 11, 2016

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — A former Freedom Industries executive was sentenced Thursday to one month in federal prison for a chemical spill that fouled the drinking water supply of 300,000 West Virginians. Dennis Farrell also was fined $20,000 in U.S. District Court. "I'm truly sorry for what happened," Farrell said prior to sentencing on pollution violations. "My hope was, I wish I could go back with the knowledge I now have. I will never forget the lessons I have learned." The January 2014 spill of a coal-cleaning agent into the Elk River in Charleston got into a water company's intake and prompted a tap-water ban in nine counties for up to 10 days.

  • Fired Coastal Commission exec: 'Maybe I was too independent'

    Updated: Thu, Feb 11, 2016

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — The Latest on the turmoil at the California Coastal Commission (all times local): 2:40 p.m. The ousted top executive at the California Coastal Commission suspects he was fired because he was too independent. In a telephone interview, former Executive Director Charles Lester also questioned why the commission retreated behind closed doors to discuss his status and vote Wednesday night. Lester — who was dismissed by a 7-5 margin — says questions about a lack of communication with commission members or diversity at the agency were not sufficient to justify his ouster. With a lot of money at stake in coastal development, Lester says there is a lot of interest in the power vested in the s

  • Myspace still exists? Yes, and now Time Inc. owns it

    Updated: Thu, Feb 11, 2016

    NEW YORK (AP) — Myspace still exists? It does, and the company that owns the once-ubiquitous social network is being bought by Time Inc. to help the magazine publisher target ads. Time Inc. did not say Thursday what it paid. The publisher of People, Sports Illustrated and Time magazines was spun off from entertainment company Time Warner in 2014. It is facing a decline in print ad dollars and posted an $881 million loss last year. Myspace's parent company is Viant, which says it provides marketers with access to over 1.2 billion registered users. That's the number of people who have signed in to Myspace since it was created in 2003. Myspace peaked in 2008 with some 76 million U.S. visitors before losing ground t

  • Ex-Irish bank executive agrees to return to Ireland

    Updated: Thu, Feb 11, 2016

    BOSTON (AP) — The former chief executive of Anglo Irish Bank, now living in Boston, has dropped his fight against extradition and agreed to return to Ireland to face fraud charges. Irish investigators have accused David Drumm of conspiring to conceal massive losses from shareholders. He left Ireland after the bank collapsed. He moved in 2009 to the Boston suburb of Wellesley, where he was arrested in October. A March 1 extradition hearing had been scheduled. But on Thursday, Drumm agreed to return to Ireland. During a hearing in federal court, Drumm waived his right to an extradition hearing. Drumm said in an affidavit filed with the court that he will continue to contest the charges in the Irish courts.




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