• Jobs report helps ease concerns a recession might be nearing

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. manufacturing is shrinking, corporate profits are declining and goods are piling up on warehouse shelves. Those trends have elevated concern that a U.S. recession may loom in the next year or two. Yet in the one area that matters most, the economy has continued to shine: Hiring. Last month, employers added 151,000 jobs, a tepid pace by recent standards but still enough to help cut the unemployment rate to a nearly eight-year low of 4.9 percent. Over the three months that ended in January, hiring has averaged a robust 231,000 a month. Such a trend typically reflects an economy in prime health, not one nearing a recession.

  • Germany: Suspect in attack plot registered as Syrian refugee

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    BERLIN (AP) — One of four Algerian men suspected of plotting an attack in Berlin had registered in Germany as a Syrian refugee and another had contacts in Belgium, police said Friday. Police, who suspect the four had ties to the Islamic State group, conducted raids Thursday in Berlin and western Germany. One of the Algerians and his wife were arrested at a refugee home because they were sought by Algerian authorities for belonging to the extremist group. Berlin police said the man arrived with his family in Germany at the end of last year and sought asylum under a Syrian identity. Police said they established that another of the Algerians, who wasn't arrested, had contacts with Belgium. They didn't elaborate, but the

  • 6 Sierra Leone activists convicted in land dispute case

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — A court in Sierra Leone has convicted six people of destroying 40 palm trees that belonged to a French company accused of land grabbing in the West African nation. The defendants also were sentenced to six months in prison and ordered to pay more than $10,000 — an enormous sum in the deeply impoverished country. Among the defendants was the leader of a land owners association that has accused European agribusiness company SOCFIN of land grabbing. Protesters say SOCFIN's agreement to farm the land lacked adequate compensation and transparency. SOCFIN, which is owned by the French company Bollore, has over the years denied any wrongdoing, saying it has complied with all government l

  • Bus plunges off bridge into river in India, killing 25

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    AHMADABAD, India (AP) — A bus plunged off a bridge into a river in western India on Friday, killing 25 people and injuring 20 others, an official said. Ramya Mohan, a senior local official, said the bus fell about 10 meters (35 feet) off the bridge into the Purna river in Navsari district of Gujarat state. The area is about 350 kilometers (220 miles) south of the state's main city, Ahmadabad. Mohan said the cause of the accident was not immediately known. Poorly maintained roads and vehicles are responsible for many road accidents in India.

  • AP FACT CHECK: Dems in New Hampshire

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Clinton cast the financial industry as an adversary in her presidential campaign — despite the money that industry has poured into her White House effort. Bernie Sanders once again mischaracterized the share of the wealth taken by the very richest Americans. A look at some of the claims in their latest Democratic presidential debate: CLINTON on Wall Street: "They are trying to beat me in this primary." THE FACTS: Wall Street is not the anti-Clinton monolith she implied. People in the securities and investment industry gave more than $17 million last year to super political action committees supporting her presidential run and nearly $3 million directly to her campaign, according to OpenSec

  • Friends of the Pryor Creek Library Receives Nexus 7s through Google Grant

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    The nonprofit organization Friends of the Pryor Creek Library was awarded a grant from Google to enhance the library’s technology infrastructure, broadening its local impact and reaching Pryor residents in a new way. The $5,250 grant will provide Friends of the Pryor Creek Library 70 Nexus 7 tablets. The mission of the nonprofit organization is to promote literacy and support the Thomas J. Harrison Library in Pryor Creek. “We are truly grateful when a company invests in educational initiatives, especially reading. Traditional literature and hardback books are now streamed on tablets and other modern devices.

  • Texas Health Becomes First North Texas Healty System to join HASA

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    Texas Health Resources, soon to be a part of the Prosper community, has become the first North Texas health system to join HASA — the health information exchange for 132 counties in North, South and West Texas regions. THR broke ground July 23 on its new complex just north of U.S. Highway 380. See the Prospe Press story on the Internet at http://bit.ly/1OeI1Ab for details. The collaborative effort is a newly expanded health information exchange established to enhance the interconnection between health care providers and patients across several Texas regions.

  • Furniture giant IKEA loses its trademark in Indonesia

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — There is Samsung of South Korea, Sony of Japan, BMW of Germany and IKEA of Indonesia. Wait! IKEA of Indonesia? Yes, at least in Indonesia, if not worldwide. The furniture giant, founded in Sweden in 1943, has lost a trademark dispute in Indonesia after the country's highest court agreed the IKEA name was owned by a local company. Indonesian rattan furniture company PT Ratania Khatulistiwa registered its IKEA trademark in December 2013. It's an acronym of the Indonesian words Intan Khatulistiwa Esa Abadi, which refer to the rattan industry. The Supreme Court's ruling was made in May last year, but only surfaced publicly Thursday with its publication online by the court.

  • JC Penney looking at possible HQ sale and partial leaseback

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    NEW YORK (AP) — J.C. Penney is considering selling and partially leasing back its headquarters to help lower debt and create long-term savings. The department store operator said Friday that it has a surplus of square footage available in the Plano, Texas office building, with favorable market conditions making it a good time for such a real estate transaction. J.C. Penney Co. has been in the three-story building since 1992. The company had a strong holiday season. A key sales metric rose 3.9 percent as shoppers picked up home goods and other gifts. Earlier this month it started selling refrigerators, washing machines and other appliances at some of its stores for the first time in more than 30 years. J.C. Penne

  • Stocks edge lower in early trading on Wall Street

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market opened slightly lower after the government reported only modest job growth last month. The Dow Jones industrial average edged down 54 points, or 0.3 percent, to 16,359 as of 9:35 a.m. Eastern time. The Standard & Poor's 500 index lost 12 points, or 0.7 percent, to 1,902. The Nasdaq composite gave up 36 points, or 0.8 percent, to 4,472. Several stocks were moving on earnings news. LinkedIn plunged 34 percent after the social media company released a weak forecast for 2016. Tyson Foods soared 10 percent after its earnings came in well ahead of analysts' estimates. Bond prices fell. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 1.87 percent.

  • US exports fell in 2015 for first time since recession

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. trade deficit rose in December as American exports fell for a third straight month, reflecting the pressures of a stronger dollar and spreading global weakness. Those factors contributed to the first annual drop in U.S. export sales since the Great Recession shrank global trade six years ago. The December deficit increased 2.7 percent to $43.4 billion, the Commerce Department reported Friday. Exports fell by 0.3 percent, driven by sales declines of civilian aircraft, autos and farm products. Imports increased 0.3 percent as Americans bought more foreign-made cars and petroleum. For all of 2015, the deficit rose 4.6 percent to $531.5 billion. Exports fell 4.8 percent, the first setback since 2009 w

  • Indiana county's drug overdose deaths surged to 59 in 2015

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    SOUTH BEND, Ind. (AP) — Drug overdose deaths in northern Indiana's St. Joseph County outnumbered the county's total deaths from homicides and fatal vehicle crashes last year. The increase comes amid a dramatic surge in deaths attributed to heroin and prescription painkillers. The South Bend Tribune reports (http://bit.ly/1L2Mxg2 ) that St. Joseph County saw 59 people die from accidental drug overdoses last year. That compares with 2015's combined total of 57 vehicle crash deaths and homicides. Alcohol and Addictions Resource Center counselor Sharon Burden calls the 59 overdose deaths "an outrageously high number." Coroner Randy Magdalinski says many of those deaths happened in clusters, just days apart.

  • US trade deficit up in 2015; exports drop for first time since recession amid strong dollar, global weakness

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    WASHINGTON (AP) — US trade deficit up in 2015; exports drop for first time since recession amid strong dollar, global weakness.

  • Hiring slows as US employers add just 151,000 jobs last month; firms shed education, transportation and temp workers

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Hiring slows as US employers add just 151,000 jobs last month; firms shed education, transportation and temp workers.

  • Estee Lauder 2Q results top Street, hair care sales climb

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    NEW YORK (AP) — Estee Lauder's fiscal second-quarter results topped analysts' estimates thanks in part to increased sales of makeup, fragrances and hair care products. The beauty products company earned $446.2 million, or $1.19 per share, for the three months ended Dec. 31. A year earlier the New York company earned $435.7 million, or $1.13 per share. Earnings, adjusted for non-recurring costs, came to $1.22 per share. The results beat Wall Street expectations. Analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research expected earnings of $1.09 per share. Revenue rose to $3.12 billion from $3.04 billion a year ago. The latest figure beat the $3.07 billion that Zacks analysts predicted.

  • Cruz shares his sister’s addiction story in drug-ravaged New Hampshire

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    HOOKSETT, N.H. — The heroin epidemic has ravaged New Hampshire, where nearly half the residents know someone who’s abused the drug. Ted Cruz feels their pain. “Miriam, her whole life was angry. She never forgave my dad for divorcing her mother. Her whole life she had a rage. She was angry at the world, she was angry at God,” he told a forum on drug addiction, sharing in moving detail the story of a sister who died of an overdose at age 49. “Every one of us has seen people we love stumble and fall. And hopefully, we’ve seen people pick themselves up again and turn around,” he said. Cruz is still offering himself as a conservative warrior.

  • Teen files defamation suit against KOAA for allegedly airing photo of genitalia

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    A federal lawsuit filed against KOAA last week claims that the Pueblo-based TV news station sexually exploited a 14-year-old boy by airing an image of his penis in a news report. The teenager, now 16, named the TV station and six of its employees for sexual exploitation, invasion of privacy and defamation in a suit filed in Denver district court Jan. 29. The Gazette generally does not publish the names of juveniles in cases of sex crimes. Other defendants include NBC Universal and Comcast. The teenager and his family told KOAA in February 2014 about a blackmail attempt against the boy after a cell phone video of the teenager's penis was uploaded on YouTube, the lawsuit says.

  • Moody's tops Street 4Q forecasts

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    NEW YORK (AP) — Moody's Corp. (MCO) on Friday reported fourth-quarter net income of $217.9 million. On a per-share basis, the New York-based company said it had net income of $1.09. The results topped Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of eight analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was for earnings of $1.05 per share. The credit ratings agency posted revenue of $865.9 million in the period, also surpassing Street forecasts. Four analysts surveyed by Zacks expected $850.3 million. For the year, the company reported profit of $941.3 million, or $4.63 per share. Revenue was reported as $3.48 billion. Moody's expects full-year earnings to be $4.75 to $4.85 per share.

  • Official: spy was in Lebanon to help kidnapped Czech

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    PRAGUE (AP) — The Czech defense minister says a military spy who was among five Czechs returned Thursday from Lebanon was seeking information about a fellow countryman kidnapped in Libya last year. The minister, Martin Stropnicky, was quoted in the Hospodarske Noviny daily Friday as saying the military agent, Martin Psik, went to Lebanon in an effort "to help our cook in Libya." It was the first official comment on Psik's role in the group which also included a lawyer, an interpreter and two journalists. They all returned home Thursday, the same day the Czech government refused to extradite a Lebanese man to the U.S. to face weapons charges.

  • Drought-stricken Zimbabwe declares state of disaster

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe has declared a state of disaster as the country struggles to deal with a drought afflicting the region. A government statement said Thursday that Mugabe had announced the designation, which is aimed at speeding the flow of aid to needy communities. Philippe Van Damme, the European Union ambassador to Zimbabwe, warned last month that Zimbabwe's delays in declaring the drought a disaster could limit chances of getting international support at a time when donors are swamped with multiple humanitarian crises.




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