• California environmentalist shakes up Florida race

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — A California billionaire environmentalist is pouring millions of dollars into the Florida governor's race to buy television ads attacking Gov. Rick Scott as a friend of polluters and utility companies, giving the campaign of Democratic front-runner Charlie Crist a boost as polls show a tightening race. Former hedge fund manager Tom Steyer has put Scott and the Florida Republican Party on the defensive, prompting them to hit back with their own ads attacking Steyer as a hypocrite. They have also threatened television stations with lawsuits if they carry the ads, which Scott's lawyers say are misleading and defamatory. So far, one Fort Myers station has stopped running them.

  • Uber hires former Obama adviser Plouffe

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Uber is stepping up its political game with a high-powered new hire. The taxi-alternative service is hiring a former White House adviser to lead its campaign for acceptance in the 170 cities around the world where it operates. David Plouffe is best known for running President Barack Obama's 2008 campaign. He is joining Uber as senior vice president of policy and strategy in September, bringing a campaign mindset to a company that has faced resistance in some U.S. cities from the taxi industry and regulators. Uber's app lets smartphone users locate nearby part-time drivers for the service, who use their own cars to ferry around passengers, as well as locate yellow cabs in cities like New York.

  • Wyoming primary a referendum on Gov. Mead

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Republican voters went to the polls Tuesday to answer the question of whether widespread dissatisfaction with the federal government gives them any reason to vote out incumbent Gov. Matt Mead. Challengers Dr. Taylor Haynes and Superintendent of Public Instruction Cindy Hill both campaigned on the idea that they can move Wyoming farther away from federal control. Haynes, a retired urologist turned rancher, is the most outspoken. If elected, he has said he would work to have Wyoming take over the millions of acres of federal lands within its borders. Despite criticism from legal scholars, Haynes says the Constitution is on his side in his desire to drive federal employees from the state or face jail time

  • AP Exclusive: US changing no-fly list rules

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration is promising to change the way travelers can ask to be removed from its no-fly list of suspected terrorists banned from air travel. The decision comes after a federal judge's ruling that there was no meaningful way to challenge the designation, a situation deemed unconstitutional. In response, the Justice Department said the U.S. will change the process during the next six months. As of late last summer, about 48,000 people were on the no-fly list. The government's policy is never to confirm or deny that a person actually is on the no-fly list, citing national security concerns.

  • AP Exclusive: US changing no-fly list rules

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Obama administration is promising to change the way travelers can ask to be removed from its no-fly list of suspected terrorists banned from air travel. The decision comes after a federal judge's ruling that there was no meaningful way to challenge the designation, a situation deemed unconstitutional. In response, the Justice Department said the U.S. will change the process during the next six months. As of late last summer, about 48,000 people were on the no-fly list. The government's policy is never to confirm or deny that a person actually is on the no-fly list, citing national security concerns.

  • New Mexico chile gets certified-product safeguards

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    BERNALILLO, N.M. (AP) — Idaho has its potatoes. Florida has its fresh fruits and juices. Vidalia is the name synonymous with the nation's most famous sweet onion. Now New Mexico has its own trademark and certification program to protect the reputation and integrity of its signature crop: chile. Gov. Susana Martinez, members of the New Mexico Chile Association and other officials unveiled the program before a packed room of chile aficionados gathered Tuesday at The Range Cafe, the first restaurant to sign up. Martinez described chile as a way of life in New Mexico. Aside from being a part of breakfast, lunch and dinner, the chile industry contributes more than $460 million every year to the state's economy and employs

  • Q&A: How 1 US factory owner fought cheap imports

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Much of U.S. manufacturing has been decimated in the past decade by less expensive imports from China, but it didn't necessarily have to be that way, according to a compelling new book by journalist Beth Macy. Macy's book, "Factory Man," tells the story of one manufacturer who fought back. John Bassett III, a wealthy scion of a furniture dynasty in southwestern Virginia, responded to a flood of overseas goods by modernizing his factory and restructuring its products. More controversially, he successfully petitioned the U.S. government for protective tariffs on imported Chinese furniture, alienating many of his retailer customers. Those efforts kept his company, Vaughan-Bassett, in business.

  • FDA approves new drug for rare genetic disease

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved a new capsule-based drug to treat Gaucher's disease. Regulators approved the new drug, Cerdelga, for patients with the Type 1 form of the rare genetic disorder, which causes excess fat to build up in the spleen, liver and bone marrow. Cerdelga is from Genzyme, the specialty drugmaker that introduced the first drug for Gaucher's disease 20 years ago. The oral treatment could serve as an alternative to Genzyme's best-selling drug Cerezyme, which is given intravenously. Cerezyme had sales of $935 million last year. The drug costs $300,000 for a year's supply, on average. Genzyme says it will soon release pricing for its new drug.

  • Attorney blasts fatal police shooting at Wal-Mart

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    CINCINNATI (AP) — An attorney for the family of a man fatally shot by police at a Wal-Mart store said Tuesday that surveillance video of the shooting shows it was unjustified, and the state's top lawman said a special grand jury will begin considering whether charges are appropriate against the officers. Attorney Michael Wright, who represents the family of 21-year-old John Crawford III, said in a statement that surveillance video of the shooting "showed that absolutely this young man ... was killed without justification or cause." Police in the Dayton suburb of Beavercreek said they shot Crawford on Aug. 5 at the Wal-Mart after he waved an air rifle at customers and refused officers' orders to drop it.

  • Uber hires former Obama adviser Plouffe

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama's former campaign manager and White House senior adviser David Plouffe is joining car service startup Uber as it seeks to expand in cities worldwide. Plouffe will serve as Uber's senior vice president of policy and strategy, bringing a campaign mindset to a company that has faced resistance in some U.S. cities from the taxi industry and regulators. "Uber has been in a campaign but hasn't been running one. That is changing now," Uber CEO Travis Kalanick said in a blog post announcing Plouffe's hiring. Uber uses a mobile application to connect riders with vehicles for hire. The San Francisco-based company has run into opposition from taxi industry groups which accuse it of loweri

  • Corps: Waterway infrastructure improvements needed

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — Higher-capacity ports, expanded locks and dams and other infrastructure improvements are needed in the Mississippi River Watershed to allow its waterways to handle shipping demands caused by higher agriculture, oil and natural gas production and manage climate change effects, a U.S. Army Corps of Engineers official said Tuesday. Brig. Gen. Peter A. DeLuca, commander of the corps' Mississippi Valley Division, spoke Tuesday at a public meeting held on a corps vessel on the Mississippi River in Memphis. He called on federal, state and local governments — plus citizens groups, businesses and private entrepreneurs — to invest in updating existing infrastructure, and starting new projects. In June, Presi

  • Billionaire to pay $1.5M fine for Kentucky mines

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — West Virginia billionaire Jim Justice has reached a $1.5 million settlement with Kentucky officials over dozens of violations at several of his coal mines in eastern Kentucky. The agreement between Justice and the state's Department for Natural Resources is a reduction from the $4.5 million in outstanding penalties he owed for the violations, according to the settlement. Kentucky officials said the violations came from not doing post-mining reclamation work required by law at Justice mines in eight counties. Kentucky Energy and Environment Cabinet Secretary Len Peters said in a news release Tuesday that the violations at Justice-owned mines "were among the most egregious we have seen in nearly a decad

  • Fork lift load falls on man, fatally injuring him

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    LYNNWOOD, Wash. (AP) — A forklift driver hit the brakes and sent the vehicle's load falling onto a customer outside a Lynnwood, Washington, business, causing fatal injuries. Police say the driver was moving a box of merchandize through the parking lot Monday morning when he saw a flash of blue and slammed on the brakes. The box fell forward onto the 64-year-old Bothell man. The customer was taken to Harborview Medical Center in Seattle, where he died early Tuesday.

  • Audit: 'Obamacare' tax not meeting revenue target

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — An "Obamacare" tax on medical devices is falling short of its revenue target because thousands of companies aren't paying it, according to a government audit released Tuesday. The audit by the Treasury inspector general for tax administration says the IRS needs to do a better job policing the tax. The tax agency, however, doesn't have adequate tools to identify which companies owe it, the audit said. The report could add fuel to efforts to repeal the tax, which is opposed by Republicans and many Democrats. While the IRS has taken steps to educate companies about the tax, the agency "faces challenges to definitively identify manufacturers subject to the medical device excise tax reporting and payment

  • Home Depot and Lennar are big market movers

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market: NYSE Home Depot Inc., up $4.64 to $88.23 The home improvement retailer reported a 14 percent jump in quarterly profit and raised its annual guidance, topping expectations. Lennar Corp., up $1.25 to $38.80 The home construction industry experienced a rebound in July, rising to its fastest pace in eight months. Aeropostale Inc., up 63 cents to $3.87 The casual clothing and apparel retailer said its former CEO, Julian Geiger, will immediately move back into the position. TJX Cos., up $4.66 to $58.

  • US stocks move higher; Home Depot rises

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are closing higher after investors got some encouraging news about home building and corporate earnings. The Dow Jones industrial average rose 80 points, or 0.5 percent, to close at 16,919 Tuesday. The Standard & Poor's 500 index rose nine points, or 0.5 percent, to 1,981. The index is now six points below the record high close it reached on July 24. The Nasdaq climbed 19 points, or 0.5 percent, to 4,527. Investors were encouraged by a bounce in home construction last month and news that consumer prices rose at the slowest pace in five months. Home Depot jumped 6 percent after its income surged thanks to a rebound in its spring selling season. Bond prices were flat. The yi

  • Defense grills plant manager in salmonella trial

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    ALBANY, Ga. (AP) — Defense attorneys for three people charged in a deadly salmonella outbreak sought to deflect blame and poke holes in the government's case Tuesday as they grilled a co-defendant, who is a key prosecution witness. The co-defendant, Samuel Lightsey, was a former manager of a Georgia peanut processing plant blamed in the 2008-09 outbreak. He was indicted along with his former boss, Peanut Corporation of America owner Stewart Parnell, and two others. Lightsey pleaded guilty in May after reaching a deal with prosecutors. The 76-count indictment accuses Parnell and his brother, food broker Michael Parnell, of shipping tainted products to customers and covering up lab tests showing they contained salmonella.

  • Georgia regulators approve nuclear plant spending

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    ATLANTA (AP) — State utility regulators have approved Georgia Power's latest spending on a new nuclear plant. The members of the Public Service Commission voted unanimously Tuesday to approve Georgia Power's expenditure of $389 million to build two new reactors at Plant Vogtle (VOH'-gohl). The vote covered construction spending during 2013. The utility is expected to spend more than $6 billion on its share of the massive project. Executives for the Southern Co. subsidiary have said the first of the new reactors should be operating in late 2017, while the second is supposed to come online late in 2018. State monitors have said Georgia Power and its co-owners of the new plant may face challenges sticking to that s

  • Investigators release Quebec train disaster report

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    TORONTO (AP) — The weak safety culture of a now-defunct railway company and poor government oversight were among the many factors that led to an oil train explosion that killed 47 people in Quebec last year, Canada's Transportation Safety Board said in a new report released Tuesday. TSB chair Wendy Tadros said 18 factors played a role, including a rail company that cut corners and a Canadian regulator that didn't do proper safety audits. The safety board issued its report 13 months after a runaway train carrying 72 carloads of volatile oil from North Dakota derailed, hurtled down an incline and slammed into downtown Lac-Megantic, Quebec. Several train cars exploded and 40 buildings were leveled.

  • WhiteWave to remove ingredient from Horizon, Silk

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — WhiteWave Foods says it will remove an ingredient from Horizon milks and Silk beverages in response to customer feedback. Carrageenan, a seaweed extract that is used as a thickener and emulsifier, will be phased out from Horizon and Silk products over time, said Sara Loveday, a company spokeswoman. The ingredient has been the subject of criticism in some circles, with food advocates pointing to animal studies that suggest it causes gastrointestinal inflammation and other problems. Loveday says WhiteWave still thinks carrageenan is safe, but decided to remove it because customer feedback has been so strong. It's just the latest example of a food maker removing an ingredient customers found objectionable