• IS claims suicide bombing on Shiite mosque in Saudi, 4 dead

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    RIYADH, Saudi Arabia (AP) — A suicide bomber disguised as a woman blew himself up in the parking lot of a Shiite mosque during Friday prayers, killing four people in the second such attack in as many weeks claimed by the Islamic State group. The latest attack and a suicide bombing at a Shiite mosque that killed 21 people last Friday appeared aimed at fanning sectarianism and destabilizing the kingdom. Both attacks took place in the oil-rich east, which has a sizable Shiite community that has long complained of discrimination. The Islamic State group views Shiites as apostates deserving of death and also seeks the overthrow of the Saudi monarchy, which it considers corrupt and illegitimate.

  • Amazon ups Ohio jobs to 1,000, begins collecting sales taxes

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Amazon has announced a Midwest expansion in Ohio that will include 1,000 well-paying jobs over the next several years. The deal between Ohio's job-creation entity, JobsOhio, and the retailing giant was announced Friday. It adds a third data computing center in the Columbus suburb of New Albany to previously announced centers in Dublin and Hilliard. Vice President Paul Misener (MEYEZ-nuhr) says Amazon.com also will voluntarily begin collecting sales taxes from online customers in Ohio on Monday as part of the deal. He says if federal law is changed, states would receive their share of an estimated $150 million to $300 million generated annually by the tax on sales in those states. Republican

  • Senator requests radar update to clear way for wind energy

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    PENDLETON, Ore. (AP) — U.S. Sen. Ron Wyden is asking officials to update Air Force radar in Fossil because the current system is outdated and preventing the generation of nearly 4,000 megawatts of wind energy across eastern Oregon and Washington. Wyden, an Oregon Democrat, sent a May 21 letter to Pentagon and Federal Aviation Officials asking them to replace the system with technology that can overcome interference created by turbines, reports the East Oregonian (http://bit.ly/1JZhjsE ). He developers consistently run into problems with the radar in Fossil, preventing the local wind energy development that has become a leading source of revenue for many communities.

  • Recalls this week: Folding knives, night lights, bicycles

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    More than 150,000 folding knives are being recalled because of a faulty locking mechanism that can result in lacerations. Other consumer products being recalled this week include night lights and bicycles. Here's a more detailed look: FOLDING KNIVES DETAILS: Gerber's Cohort open frame folding clip knife with either a black or dark gray anodized aluminum handle. The Gerber name appears on the knife clip. They were sold at Bass Pro Shops, Cabela's, Home Depot, other retailers nationwide and online at www.gerbergear.com and other online sporting goods stores from January 2013 through March 2015. Knives with Gerber model numbers 30-000645N, 31-001714N, 31-001714NDIP, 31-001715N, 31-002488N, 31-002488NDIP, 31-002722HDN, 31-0

  • Timeline of the California oil spill and response

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    SANTA BARBARA, Calif. (AP) — On May 19, an underground pipeline on California's Central Coast leaked up to 101,000 gallons of crude oil. It fouled nearby beaches, and an estimated 21,000 gallons flowed into the ocean. It was the worst spill in the area since a platform blowout in 1969 spilled several million gallons and helped give rise to the modern environmental movement. Plains All American Pipeline operates the line just north of Santa Barbara. Lawmakers and conservationists are raising questions about whether the company and the federal agencies in charge of the cleanup reacted quickly enough. A timeline of events on the day of the spill: —10:45 a.m.

  • Appeals court rejects windmill plan off Atlantic City

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. (AP) — A company that wants to build windmills off the coast of Atlantic City will take its case to the New Jersey Supreme Court following an appellate court's rejection of the plan. A state appeals court ruled against Fishermen's Energy on Friday morning. The firm wants to put five windmills about 3 miles off the coast. Company CEO Chris Wissemann said Fishermen's Energy will appeal to the high court within the next few weeks. "The court deferred to the Board of Public Utilities' judgment that our proposed Chinese partner did not have English-language financials," he said.

  • Tanker truck spills 4K gallons of diesel in crash

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Wyoming Highway Patrol officials say a tanker truck crashed and spilled more than 4,000 gallons of diesel about 30 miles south of Afton. Sgt. David Wagener said in a statement Friday that 36-year-old Joshua Burrup of Chubbuck, Idaho, crashed the diesel-filled tanker early Thursday on U.S. Highway 89. The truck lay on its side across the roadway as its contents poured from the breach. Hazardous materials crews responded to prevent the spill from reaching the nearby Salt Creek. Wagener says officials believe none of the diesel entered the creek. The roadway was closed for about six hours while the cleanup was taking place. Investigators have not yet released a cause for the crash.

  • High-yield bond funds: Love them or leave them?

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Don't know what to make of the junk-bond market? Join the club. One month, dollars are flooding into junk-bond mutual funds and exchange-traded funds. The next, dollars are pouring out the opposite direction. Consternation is nothing new for this part of the market: Junk bonds are essentially loans made to companies with poor credit ratings, and they have to offer relatively big yields to attract investors. But skittishness has been particularly high, with $9.3 billion fleeing junk-bond funds in December only for $9.6 billion to go right back in two months later. Since then, flows have continued to be erratic into and out of junk-bond funds, which are also called high-yield bond funds, and several factors wo

  • 'Clean energy' bills take back seat to Illinois budget

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Measures advertised as promoting "clean energy" in Illinois — including a plan pushed by power-producing giant Exelon Corp. — have stalled in the General Assembly, consumed, supporters say, by bickering over the state budget and an unsettled energy outlook. Two pieces of legislation unveiled with great fanfare early in the session never received public hearings, including a contentious proposal that Exelon says would save three nuclear plants from closure and thousands of jobs, but which critics deride as a bailout for an otherwise profitable company. The legislative session is scheduled to end Sunday.

  • New tech is changing the restaurant reservations game

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    At noon on a recent Wednesday in May, San Francisco's Lazy Bear restaurant began taking reservations for June. Just 45 minutes later, nearly every seat for the entire month was sold out. Not reserved. Sold. As in, every meal for almost every seat for an entire month bought and paid for in advance. That's because Lazy Bear uses an increasingly popular ticketing system model for its "reservations" that asks diners to pay upfront for their meals much the way theater patrons pay for their seats. The tickets cannot be refunded or changed, though they can be given to someone else, much as one could with tickets to a concert or a baseball game.

  • US appeals court: Alzheimer's drug swap is anti-competitive

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — A federal appeals court has ruled that drug manufacturer Actavis PLC's attempted switch of patented Alzheimer's medication, which halted distribution of the old drug before its patent expires this summer, violates U.S. antitrust law. The decision unsealed this week explains the ruling last week by a three-judge panel of the 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals that requires the Irish company to keep distributing Namenda until 30 days after its patent expires on July 11. New York Attorney General Eric Schneiderman sought that court order. He alleged antitrust and state law violations by Actavis in pushing about 500,000 patients to its new patented drug Namenda XR to avoid losses from cheaper generics.

  • US Bancorp CEO warns of cuts if interest rates don't move

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    U.S. Bancorp's leader has warned that his company might consider cutting staff if interest rates don't begin to rise later this year, as federal officials have indicated. Chairman and CEO Richard Davis told guests at a conference that engaged and happy employees are a key to making the company perform well and ultimately return value to shareholders. He said he believes the economy is in the "very last inning" before interest rates move and, if he is right, a decision to not make any cuts from the bank's employee base makes sense. "If we're wrong, and rates actually aren't going to move up, and they are fundamental to our long-term course, trust me, we will cut expenses," he said Thursday at the conference.

  • Head of UAW rival: No close ties to anti-labor group at VW

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    CHATTANOOGA, Tenn. (AP) — The head of a rival group to the United Auto Workers at the Volkswagen plant in Tennessee says his group doesn't share close links to another outfit that worked against a union election at the factory last year. The American Council of Employees was formed after the UAW narrowly lost that vote. A group called Southern Momentum organized opposition to unionization at the Chattanooga plant. The newer group, ACE, now has an attorney who served as a leader of Southern Momentum. But ACE's president, Sean Moss, says it's wrong to assume there's wide overlap between ACE and Southern Momentum.

  • Observatory at One World Trade Center opens to public

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — There's a new bird's eye view of New York City. The One World Trade Center observatory officially opened to the public on Friday with a ribbon-cutting ceremony. Visitors will get a view of the city and its surroundings from above 1,250 feet, with sight lines stretching 50 miles past the Manhattan skyline and Statue of Liberty to the Atlantic Ocean. The observatory takes up levels 100, 101, and 102 of the building, the nation's tallest, at 1,776 feet. The main public viewing space is on the 100th floor, with restaurants on the 101st floor, and an event space on the 102nd floor. Visitors reach the observatory via one of five elevators called 'skypods' that zip them to the observatory in 60 seconds.

  • US consumer sentiment drops in May

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A weak U.S. economy pulled down consumer sentiment in May. The University of Michigan says its index of consumer sentiment dropped to 90.7 from 95.9 in April. The May reading was the lowest since November. Consumers of all ages and income levels were gloomier this month. And they were less confident both about current economic conditions and the future. But Richard Curtin, chief economist of the surveys, noted that the index has averaged 94.6 the first five months of 2015, highest since 2004. On Tuesday, the Conference Board, a business group, reported that its measure of consumer spirits showed modest improvement in May. Its consumer confidence index rose to 95.4 from 94.3 in April.

  • Google, Apple, Facebook against NC renewable mandate freeze

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Three technology and social media giants with North Carolina operations want legislative leaders to back away from changing a 2007 law requiring utilities to get increasing percentages of electricity they sell from renewables and efficiencies. Apple, Facebook and Google put their names to a letter this week originating from a trade group to House Speaker Tim Moore and Senate leader Phil Berger. The companies operate data centers in three western counties. They wrote they don't want legislation to pass that would freeze current Renewable Energy Portfolio Standard levels. They said they came to North Carolina in part due to its energy policy and believe such standards reduce ratepayer costs.

  • Supreme Court: Green Bay improperly revoked tribe's permit

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    MADISON, Wis. (AP) — The state Supreme Court says the city of Green Bay improperly revoked an Oneida Nation subsidiary's permit for an alternative energy plant. Oneida Seven Generations Corp. got a permit from the city council in 2011 to build the facility. After opposition to the plant grew, the council revoked the permit in 2012 based on what project critics alleged were misrepresentations Seven Generations made about the plant's environmental impact. A circuit court agreed with the city but a state appeals court sided with the tribal company last year. The Supreme Court upheld the appellate decision Friday, finding no substantial evidence shows the corporation misrepresented the environmental impact.

  • Carl's, Hardee's CEO: Not all models know how to eat burgers

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Carl's Jr. and Hardee's ads starring nearly naked women have become a part of American culture, according to Andy Puzder, CEO of the chains' parent company. "People watch for the ads, and want to know when the next one's coming out," he says. Some of the women were relatively unknown before they appeared in the ads. Others, such as Heidi Klum and Padma Lakshmi, were already famous. The 64-year-old chief executive says the ads "cut through the clutter" and make an impression on the younger men the burger chains court. CKE Restaurants, the parent company of Carl's and Hardee's, is privately held and doesn't disclose financial results. But it says sales were up 5 percent at established locations in the se

  • Response by operator of broken oil pipeline faces scrutiny

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    SANTA BARBARA, Calif. (AP) — Emergency workers and officials from a pipeline operator had gathered last week to train for the worst — an oil spill — when a 911 call came in reporting a noxious smell at a nearby beach. Santa Barbara County firefighters rushed to the shoreline, where they discovered oil flowing across a beach and into the Pacific. What was supposed to be a drill turned real. "It was very black. You couldn't see the sand anymore," fire Capt. Craig Vanderzwaag recalled after arriving at the leak May 19. "You could see rolling waves with black oil lapping up on the beach." By the time the firefighters traced the source of the spill to a ruptured underground pipeline, thousands of gallons of crude had e

  • The top 10 highest-paid female CEOs

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Female CEOs are outpacing their male colleagues in pay, although they remain vastly outnumbered in the top echelons of American companies. Last year, the median pay for women CEOs rose to $15.9 million, a 21 percent gain from a year earlier, according to a study by executive compensation data firm Equilar and The Associated Press. That compared with median pay for male CEOs of $10.4 million, which was down 0.8 percent from 2013. Marissa Mayer, the head of Yahoo, was the highest-paid female chief executive in the Equilar/AP pay study. Her compensation was almost double that of the next-highest earner on the list — Carol Meyrowitz of discount retailer TJX Companies.




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