• Wyoming, Arch Coal reach bankruptcy bonding deal

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Wyoming regulators have reached a deal with Arch Coal to accept up to $75 million in place of the company's $486 million in bonding obligations in the state while the company goes through Chapter 11 bankruptcy. Among Arch's two active mines in Wyoming is Black Thunder, one of the world's largest coal complexes. Bonding helps ensure those mines could be filled in and restored to a natural state should they ever close. For years, an ongoing agreement between Arch and Wyoming regulators called self-bonding has allowed the company to demonstrate it could cover potential reclamation costs in the state. In exchange, Arch hasn't had to post bond for those facilities.

  • Police raid offices, home connected to polygamous group

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Federal agents are serving search warrants in at several locations connected with a Utah polygamous group. The raids by the Internal Revenue Service and other agencies began Wednesday afternoon at one home and several offices associated with the Kingstons, including biodiesel company Washakie Renewable Energy. A lawyer for the group, also known as the Davis County Cooperative Society, says members are cooperating fully. Attorney Mark Hansen says the investigation doesn't appear to be connected with polygamy. Melodie Rydalch with the U.S. Attorney's Office for Utah said the agents are serving sealed warrants and declined to provide further details. The U.S.

  • Critics decry radioactive leak at New York nuclear plant

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — A leak of radioactive material into the groundwater below a nuclear power station in New York City's suburbs highlights a chronic problem with the nation's atomic plants, some watchdogs said. New testing has shown that the amount of tritium in the groundwater below the Indian Point power plant in Buchanan, New York, is about 740 times the amount allowed in drinking water, though officials said there was no public health risk from the leak. Entergy Corp., which operates the plant at the edge of the Hudson River, said Wednesday that the latest samples from monitoring wells found tritium at a level of 14.8 million picocuries per liter. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has set a limit of no more than 20,

  • Hertz warns 255 Oklahoma City employees of pending layoffs

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    Hertz Global Holdings on Wednesday told about 255 of its Oklahoma City employees that they are subject to being laid off. About 230 local information technology employees and 25 finance administration workers were told that their positions "may be impacted" as Hertz moves its day-to-day IT support to IBM, the company said. About 100 of the affected Hertz IT employees are eligible for retirement benefits, and all of the Hertz IT workers are eligible to apply for the 60 positions IBM will be hiring as part of the move, Hertz said. Most of the rental car company's information technology operation is based in Oklahoma City.

  • Whole Foods forecasts key sales figure could slip for year

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    AUSTIN, Texas (AP) — Whole Foods says its sales at established locations slipped in its fiscal first quarter and forecast the figure to be flat to down 2 percent for the year, as it works to keep prices down and fend off rivals. The Austin, Texas company noted that its comparable store sales have been "particularly difficult to predict" given the competitive environment. Whole Foods has been under pressure as organic foods and products marketed as natural have become increasingly mainstream, with big-box retailers such as Target and Wal-Mart devoting more space to such items. That has prompted Whole Foods to try and appeal to a broader customer base by keeping prices down. On Wednesday, it announced the launch of its digita

  • Norfolk Southern focused on its own plan, not merger talk

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Canadian Pacific's CEO remains focused on merging with Norfolk Southern railroad because he believes the potential benefits are compelling, but he's ready to abandon it if shareholders don't support it. Executives from both railroads spoke at an investor conference Wednesday, a day after Canadian Pacific said it planned to ask Norfolk Southern shareholders whether they support merger talks between the two railroads. Canadian Pacific CEO Hunter Harrison said he thinks consolidation makes too much sense for the rail industry because it could help move more freight without adding tracks, so he thinks deals will happen even if this one fails.

  • Jack Daniel's Distillery announces $140 million expansion

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The historic Jack Daniel's Distillery is planning a $140 million expansion project to help meet global demand for prized Tennessee Whiskey. The investment announced by Gov. Bill Haslam on Wednesday will be used to construct two new barrelhouses, expand the bottling facility and support the increasing number of visitors to the facility. Officials say more than 275,000 tourists from around the world visited the distillery in Lynchburg last year. The Louisville, Kentucky-based Brown-Forman company owns the distillery. Company officials say the expansion will create 30 new jobs in Moore County. The distillery underwent a $103 million expansion less than three years ago that added stills, barrel war

  • Mylan to buy Sweden's Meda AB for $7.2 billion

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Drugmaker Mylan says it will buy Meda AB of Sweden for $7.2 billion in cash and stock, and says the move will help it enter new markets. Mylan valued the deal at $9.9 billion including Meda's debt. It said Wednesday Meda's board and largest shareholders support the sale. Meda says about 60 percent of its sales come from prescription drugs. Key products include drugs that treat respiratory conditions, skin ailments, and pain and inflammation. Mylan had $9.45 billion in revenue in 2015 and said Meda's revenue totaled about $2.35 billion. Mylan sells about 1,000 generic drugs, but its biggest-selling product is the EpiPen, used for the emergency treatment of allergic reactions.

  • Report: Harmful gas levels in Lumber Liquidators flooring

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — A national retailer sold Chinese-made flooring that emits hazardous levels of formaldehyde, a federal investigation found. The laminate flooring was sold by Lumber Liquidators until last May, when the company announced it was halting sales. A long-awaited federal safety review found the flooring gave off enough formaldehyde gas to irritate the eyes, nose and throat of many people. There also was enough gas from the product to trigger breathing problems in people with certain health conditions, like asthma. The formaldehyde also increased cancer risks by a small amount. U.S. officials released the analysis Wednesday.

  • Twitter tweaks its timeline in pursuit of more users

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Twitter is tweaking the way that tweets appear in its users' timelines in its latest attempt to broaden the appeal of its messaging service. The change announced Wednesday moves Twitter closer to a formula that Facebook uses to determine the order of posts appearing in its users' news feeds. It's a risky move for Twitter because it threatens to infuriate many of its 320 million users who like things the way they are. But the company can't afford to stand pat with its user growth slowing dramatically and its stock price plummeting by more than 50 percent since co-founder Jack Dorsey returned as CEO last summer. Investors initially applauded Twitter for shaking things up: Its stock gained 58 cents,

  • Chancellor: Cash-strapped UC Berkeley faces tough decisions

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    BERKELEY, Calif. (AP) — The University of California, Berkeley, is running a $150 million deficit this year and must undertake a top-to-bottom review of expenses if it hopes to sustain its national standing as a premier public institution, the school's chancellor warned Wednesday. The university faces difficult decisions as it works to preserve its long-term financial footing, Chancellor Nicholas Dirks said. Consolidating academic departments, evaluating spending on athletics, shedding staff and admitting fewer doctoral students are some of the changes that will be considered, he said. "We are fighting to maintain our excellence against those who might equate 'public' with mediocrity," Dirks wrote in a letter to the campus.

  • Key things to know about changes in Twitter's timeline

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Twitter's tweaking its timeline to emphasize certain tweets from people you follow, but don't expect dramatic changes from the chronological feed you're used to. The rearrangement will show up only if you enable it. And it might not be that different from what you're already seeing under the "While you were away" section of your timeline. Twitter announced the changes Wednesday as it tries to stay relevant in the face of stiff competition from Facebook, Snapchat and other services. Here are key things to know about what's changing: ___ THE MAIN CHANGE — Twitter has been showing tweets from people and organizations you follow in chronological order, with the newest tweets up top.

  • Amid boom in catch, debate rages over lobster license rules

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — Maine lobstermen are divided about proposed changes to the state's lobster license rules that could shake up the fishery's yearslong waiting list. Maine lobsters have grown in value in recent years, and prices have held steady for consumers as lobstermen's catches have grown. A state legislative panel held a public hearing Wednesday on changes designed to streamline the process of obtaining a license. Deer Isle Democrat Rep. Walter Kumiega proposed the changes, which include the creation of a new class of license that would be limited to 300 traps instead of the usual 800. Some veteran lobstermen balk at changing the rules, while younger fishermen say a 10-year wait for a license is unfair.

  • Tesla's 4Q net loss doubles

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    DETROIT (AP) — Electric car maker Tesla Motors says its net loss more than doubled to $320 million in the fourth quarter, hurt by lower-than-planned production of its new Model X SUV. The loss, equal to $2.44 per share, compared to a loss of 86 cents per share in the same quarter a year ago. Tesla said revenue rose 27 percent to $1.2 billion for the quarter as worldwide deliveries of its Model S sedan increased to 17,478. The company delivered only 206 Model X SUVs. For the full year, Tesla lost $889 million, wider than a $294 million loss in 2014. Palo Alto, California-based Tesla, which was founded in 2003, has never made a full-year profit.

  • License Plate Reading Technology

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    PennDOT demonstrates a license plate reading technology Feb. 10, 2016 behind the Pa. State Capitol in Harrisburg, Pa. These cameras will identify license and registration of autos in real time. (Mark Pynes/PennLive.

  • Burger King's next conquest: Hot dog king

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Burger King is looking for a new crown: Hot Dog King. The Miami-based chain says it plans to put hot dogs on its menu nationally for the first time starting Feb. 23. It may seem like a jarring addition for those who know the chain for its Whoppers. But Burger King says its ability to flame-grill meat makes hot dogs a natural fit on its menu. "This is probably the most obvious product launch ever," said Alex Macedo, president of Burger King North America. With the launch, Burger King says it will offer hot dogs at all 7,100 of its U.S. restaurants — more U.S. locations than any other chain. Smaller chains that sell hot dogs include Dairy Queen and Sonic Drive-In.

  • Despite US setback, Virginia moving forward on 'Clean Power'

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Virginia is moving forward with efforts to reduce carbon emissions linked to climate change amid uncertainty over the future of the Obama administration's landmark environmental initiative. Despite a legal challenge, Gov. Terry McAuliffe, the state's largest power company and environmentalists all agreed Wednesday that work on Virginia's share of the nation's Clean Power Plan should continue. In fact, a group of power company executives, environmentalists and others working on the Virginia plan are to meet as planned Friday. A coalition of 27 primarily Republican-led states and industry opponents persuaded a divided Supreme Court to grant a lower court hearing on the argument that the proposed regulatio

  • Senate panel votes to hold website in contempt over sex ads

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A Senate panel voted on Wednesday to hold the classified advertising website Backpage.com in civil contempt for failing to comply with a congressional subpoena into how it screens ads for possible sex trafficking. The Homeland and Governmental Affairs Committee backed a resolution setting up a legal fight with the company. The full Senate must vote on the resolution. Sens. Rob Portman, R-Ohio, and Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo., sponsored the resolution after they said the company refused to comply with a subpoena last year. Holding the company in contempt would allow the committee to go to court to try to force Backpage.com to turn over documents about its screening practices.

  • Mayor shows love to skateboarders, lifts ban in Love Park

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Skateboarders in Philadelphia are feeling the love from Love Park now that the mayor has temporarily lifted a ban on skating there until it closes for renovations. Democratic Mayor Jim Kenney made the announcement Wednesday during a groundbreaking ceremony for the park and welcome center's $20 million facelift. The park is a skateboarding haven. Kenney urges skaters to take advantage of it until it closes Feb. 15. He tells skaters they're "part of the fabric" of Love Park. He says granite removed during the overhaul will be used in skate parks across the city. Skater Luke Darigan tells The Philadelphia Inquirer he's taking time off work to make the most of the opportunity.

  • Yellen: Persistent economic weakness could slow rate hikes

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen cautioned Wednesday that global weakness and falling financial markets could depress the U.S. economy's growth and slow the pace of Fed interest rate hikes. But Yellen made clear that the Fed won't likely find it necessary to cut rates after having raised them from record lows in December. She did concede, though, that negative rates, which central banks in Japan and Europe have recently imposed, are a tool the Fed has at least studied. In her semiannual report to Congress, Yellen offered no major surprises. And she reiterated the Fed's confidence that the U.S. economy was on track for stronger growth and an increase in too-low inflation.




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