• Illinois well services company moving offices to Indiana

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    VINCENNES, Ind. (AP) — A company that services oil and natural gas wells is moving its main office to southwestern Indiana from a nearby Illinois community. Franklin Well Services executives announced Tuesday that the company will have about 90 people working at its new headquarters in Vincennes by 2018. It is already moving employees and equipment from its current office in Lawrenceville, Illinois, which is about 10 miles from Vincennes across. The company is remodeling a 35,000-square-foot former department store in downtown Vincennes for its new office. The company provides well stimulation, cementing and drilling fluids services throughout Illinois, Indiana and western Kentucky. The Indiana Economic Developm

  • State: Man who said Holy Spirit guided him ran Ponzi scheme

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    BOSTON (AP) — The Massachusetts secretary of state's office says a man who told investors that the Holy Spirit guided his trading system has been charged with running a Ponzi scheme. Secretary of State William Galvin said in a complaint filed Tuesday that Uxbridge resident Charles Erickson defrauded at least 25 investors out of about $3.5 million. Authorities say about a third of those recruited for the program attended the same church as Erickson, who claimed the Holy Spirit had given him a proprietary day-trading system for a volatile type of futures contract. Authorities say he guaranteed returns of 96 percent over two years. Galvin says Erickson was paying monthly returns using capital reserves deposited by later

  • Survey: Most Americans with disabilities 'striving to work'

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — More than two-thirds of American adults with disabilities are "striving to work," according to a national employment survey being released just before the landmark legislation protecting their rights turns 25. In contrast to census data on how many people with disabilities hold jobs, the survey being released Wednesday by the Kessler Foundation goes further by exploring the experience of finding and keeping a job. It also provides a snapshot of not just the obstacles people with disabilities face but how often they overcome them.

  • SCE&G seeking rate hike due to nuclear plant costs

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — South Carolina Electric & Gas Co. is asking for a nearly 3 percent rate increase due to overruns in the cost of building two new nuclear reactors. South Carolina media outlets report the increase, if approved by state regulators, would first appear on the bills of the utility's almost 700,000 customers in November. The company says the increase will add about $4 to the bill of an average residential customer. The bill for those using about 1,000 kilowatt hours of power a month will increase to about $150. The increase is tied to the cost of new reactors at the V.C. Summer Nuclear Station about 25 miles northwest of Columbia. The cost of the reactors is $514 million more than initially forecast an

  • US factory orders slump in April; 8th decline in 9 months

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. factory orders tumbled in April, a sign that manufacturers are struggling amid a stronger dollar and cheaper oil. Orders fell 0.4 percent in April, marking the eighth decline in nine months, the Commerce Department said Tuesday. The key category that tracks business investment plans — non-military capital goods excluding aircraft — slipped 0.3 percent. Orders for electronic products plunged 4 percent, while demand in the volatile aircraft category tailed off sharply. Manufacturers have struggled in recent months with a pair of global economic pressures. The stronger dollar has increased the cost of U.S.-made goods overseas, cutting into sales in Europe and parts of Asia.

  • Virginia panel recommends new fracking regulations

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — A Virginia advisory panel is recommending that energy companies disclose the chemical ingredients they use in horizontal fracking, a type of natural gas drilling that has raised environmental concerns. The recommendation, among 14 proposed by the panel, would also require drilling companies to provide the state with closely guarded industry "recipes" for the fracking fluids. The proposals have been submitted to Gov. Terry McAuliffe's administration for review and a new round of public review. Besides the requirement on fracking ingredients, the recommendations also provide for greater safeguards of water supplies, testing of drilling equipment and monitoring of water before drilling occurs.

  • Federal eateries join effort to curb animal antibiotic use

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama's effort to curb the use of antibiotics in animals raised for meat is starting with his own employees. The White House said Tuesday that many federal cafeterias serving government workers will start serving meat and poultry from animals raised with fewer antibiotics. The directive would apply to all of those civilian government restaurants within five years. The announcement is part of a White House summit on the responsible use of antibiotics. The Obama administration announced a plan earlier this year to fight the threat posed by antibiotic-resistant bacteria. While overuse in humans is the leading concern, the administration has worked to curb use in animals processed for meat, a

  • NTSB still determining if engineer used phone before crash

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Federal investigators say they still don't know if the engineer involved in a deadly Amtrak crash in Philadelphia was on his cellphone before the speeding train derailed. The National Transportation Safety Board's preliminary report released Tuesday says it also remains unclear if damage to the windshield was caused by the wreck or an object thrown at the train. The NTSB has said engineer Brandon Bostian has been cooperative but says he cannot recall the moments before the accident. Eight passengers died and more than 200 were taken to hospitals. The two-page preliminary report estimates damage from the May 12 crash at more than $9.2 million. The NTSB says the train entered the 50 mile-per-ho

  • California farmers plan to avoid water-sucking crops

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Dozens of California farmers aiming to meet voluntary water conservation targets submitted plans to the state saying they intend to plant less thirsty crops and leave some fields unplanted amid the relentless drought. Farmers in the Sacramento-San Joaquin River Delta devised the plans filed Monday as part of a deal last month that would spare them deeper mandatory cuts in the future. Under the agreement, they must turn in plans for using 25 percent less water, fallowing 25 percent of their land or other strategies to achieve the necessary water savings. Officials hope the deal can become a model for other farmers around the state. California cities and businesses also have been ordered to red

  • Ford keeps plants running longer for third consecutive year

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    DEARBORN, Mich. (AP) — Ford will shorten the traditional summer shut-down at some of its plants for the third consecutive year to meet rising demand. The company said Tuesday that one the vehicles seeing strong demand, the revamped Ford Edge midsize SUV, set a record for May with sales up 34 percent. Sales of the 2016 Explorer, which appeared on lots in May, rose 24 percent. The company says that it will produce almost an additional 40,000 vehicles this summer with plants open for an additional week. Six assembly plants, as well as supporting powertrain and stamping plants, will shut down for one week beginning June 29, rather than the usual two weeks.

  • Geeknet ends deal with Hot Topic, takes GameStop offer

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    GRAPEVINE, Texas (AP) — Geeknet, parent company of ThinkGeek and ThinkGeek Solutions, has ended its agreement to be purchased by Hot Topic so it can accept a higher bid from video game retailer GameStop. Geeknet Inc. announced Tuesday that GameStop will pay $20 per share, or about $134.6 million. The companies put the deal's value at approximately $140 million. Last week Hot Topic Inc. agreed to buy Geeknet for $17.50 per share, or $117.3 million. But Geeknet received a $20-per-share offer a day later, although the bidder's name wasn't named at the time. Geeknet said Tuesday that after talks with GameStop and Hot Topic, its board decided that the GameStop deal was a "superior proposal.

  • US factory orders fall 0.4 percent in April, demand slides for electronics and aircraft

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — US factory orders fall 0.4 percent in April, demand slides for electronics and aircraft.

  • Concerns remain for 'Viagra for women' twice rejected by FDA

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The makers of a pill intended to boost sexual desire in women will try again this week to persuade regulators that the drug warrants approval after two rejections. But a new review released by the Food and Drug Administration shows government scientists still have concerns about whether the drug's benefits outweigh its risks. The FDA review highlights several safety issues with flibanserin, including low blood pressure and fainting spells. Those problems increased when patients combined the drug with alcohol and some other medications, according to the document. A panel of FDA experts will discuss the drug at a public meeting Thursday, before voting on whether to recommend its approval.

  • Greek uncertainty continues to weigh on global markets

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks are opening lower as investors fret over Greece's shaky finances. Investors are also looking ahead to a heavy run of U.S. economic data that culminates at the end of the week with the closely watched jobs report for May. The Dow Jones industrial average fell 54 points, or 0.3 percent, to 17,992 as of 9:35 a.m. Eastern time Tuesday. The Standard & Poor's 500 index gave up six points, or 0.3 percent, to 2,105. The Nasdaq composite lost 22 points, or 0.5 percent, to 5,059. Utilities stocks fell the most. Among individual stocks, Intel fell the most in the Dow. Bond prices fell. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note rose to 2.23 percent.

  • Copper thefts from the rails rise with price of the metal

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Longtime New York City subway cops have seen copper thefts before, but last week's heist on a stretch of open-air tracks was particularly brazen: 500 feet of inch-thick cable stripped from the rails in the middle of the night. The theft that shut down parts of the subway's biggest lines and snarled the commute for 100,000 people is only the latest example of a troubling trend on the nation's railways linked to the soaring price of copper. "This is a money-making crime," said Chief Joseph Fox, commander of the New York Police Department's Transit Bureau. "It's economy-driven.

  • Alcoa invests in facility to meet jet engine demand

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Alcoa Inc. is investing $22 million in a Michigan plant so it can meet demand for jet engines. The investment will go toward a process that strengthens the metallic structure of titanium, nickel and 3-D-printed jet engine parts. The aluminum and metals company said an increase in production of narrow-and wide-body aircraft engines, which are the top-selling jet engines in the world, is increasing the need for such capabilities. New York-based Alcoa expects the new technology at the Whitehall, Michigan, plant will be ready for product qualification in 2016.

  • Dollar General 1Q profit tops Street, key sales metric rises

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    GOODLETTSVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Dollar General's fiscal first-quarter profit topped Wall Street's expectations, and a key sales measurement rose thanks to better traffic and shoppers spending more per transaction. Its stock climbed 3 percent before the market opened. The Goodlettsville, Tennessee-based company earned $253.2 million, or 84 cents per share, for the period ended May 1. That compares with $222.4 million, or 72 cents per share, a year ago. The results beat Wall Street expectations. The average estimate of 12 analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research was for earnings of 82 cents per share. Sales at store open at least a year increased 3.7 percent.

  • Tesla Motors co-founder wants to electrify commercial trucks

    Yesterday

    SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — Twelve years ago, Ian Wright and some fellow engineers launched Tesla Motors, a Silicon Valley company that has helped jumpstart the market for electric cars. Now, the Tesla co-founder wants to electrify noisy, gas-guzzling trucks that deliver packages, haul garbage and make frequent stops on city streets. His latest venture, Wrightspeed, doesn't make the whole truck. Rather it sells electric powertrains that can be installed on medium-and heavy-duty commercial vehicles, making them cleaner, quieter and more energy-efficient. "We save a lot on fuel. We save a lot on maintenance, and we make the emissions compliance much easier," said Wright, a New Zealand-born engineer who left Tesla when it wa

  • Woman behind Silicon Valley sex bias suit appealing verdict

    Yesterday

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — A woman at the center of a high-profile gender bias lawsuit against an elite Silicon Valley venture capital firm filed an appeal of a jury verdict against her. Alan Exelrod, an attorney for plaintiff Ellen Pao, filed the two-page notice of appeal in San Francisco Superior Court Monday. There were no accompanying documents explaining grounds for the appeal, and Heather Wilson, a spokeswoman for Pao, said neither Pao nor Axelrod would have additional comment. A jury in March found that defendant Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers did not discriminate or retaliate against Pao in the case that became a flashpoint in an ongoing discussion about gender inequity at elite technology and venture capital firm

  • NC lawmakers hearing from solar workers, small biz owners

    Yesterday

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Hundreds of North Carolina small business owners and solar power workers are coming to Raleigh to talk to and hear from legislators. General Assembly leaders were scheduled to speak Tuesday to National Federation of Independent Business members visiting the Legislative Building. The federation has been pleased with the state's recent repayment of $2.8 billion in debt owed the federal government for unemployment benefits. It means unemployment insurance taxes that business pays will fall. The solar industry workers want lawmakers to be careful about legislation that would pull back on renewable energy mandates or pull the plug on renewable energy tax credits.




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