• Health experts question federal study linking cellphones to brain tumors

    Updated: 1 hr ago

    New results from a closely watched government study show why the World Health Organization has flagged mobile phones as a possible source of cancer, but they don’t make a strong case that the devices actually cause cancer in people, according to experts who have reviewed the findings. Researchers from the U.S. National Toxicology Program have spent years subjecting hundreds of animals to the kinds of radiation emitted by mobile phones to see whether that exposure makes them more susceptible to brain tumors or other health problems. A preliminary report released Friday suggests the radiation may have made male rats more likely to develop tumors in the heart and possibly the brain.

  • Cancer survivor stunned by attention over graduation denial

    Cancer survivor stunned by attention over...

    Yesterday

    PHOENIX (AP) — Overwhelming public support is outweighing any lingering bitterness for a suburban Phoenix high school student who kept up with classes through cancer treatments but wasn't allowed to walk at graduation. "Having people tell me that I'm being a voice for them is so much more powerful than these people denying me my request," Stephen Dwyer said. The 18-year-old on Sunday, just a few days after having to watch his Mesa high school's graduation ceremony from afar, said he never imagined his Facebook post about it would draw national attention. He said he has heard from strangers from all over the world through social media. Many of them are people who are dealing with illness.

  • Santa Fean's plea accepted by website that sources donations for canine cancer

    Yesterday

    Sam Blackwood was a man with a hard-luck background and a broken heart. Dinga was the little Heinz 57 mixed-blood mutt that appeared on a Santa Fe road to save him. Now Blackwood, 41, is trying to return the favor. Recently, he noticed the young dog’s appetite and energy had declined dramatically. He took her to the vet. The news was bad. Dinga has lymphoma, a type of cancer that is often fatal to dogs within two or three months. “It was a serious blow,” he said. But he discovered the Magic Bullet Fund, an online site designed to aid canines with cancer by finding donors to cover the costly treatments, and he’s helping her fight the illness. Blackwood has suffered hard times.

  • Man helps dog: Santa Fean's plea accepted by website that sources donations for canine cancer

    Updated: Sat, May 28, 2016

    Sam Blackwood was a man with a hard-luck background and a broken heart. Dinga was the little Heinz 57 mixed-blood mutt that appeared on a Santa Fe road to save him. Now Blackwood, 41, is trying to return the favor. Recently, he noticed the young dog’s appetite and energy had declined dramatically. He took her to the vet. The news was bad. Dinga has lymphoma, a type of cancer that is often fatal to dogs within two or three months. “It was a serious blow,” he said. But he discovered the Magic Bullet Fund, an online site designed to aid canines with cancer by finding donors to cover the costly treatments, and he’s helping her fight the illness. Blackwood has suffered hard times.

  • Brain tumor treatment hits a milestone in Chesterfield

    Updated: Sat, May 28, 2016

    CHESTERFIELD, Va. (AP) — Chesterfield County resident Aleka Gravely was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2008. She had a mastectomy and went through chemotherapy in 2009, after which she was declared cancer free. But then she complained to her oncologist that she was walking strangely. "I had a lot of symptoms that I can put together now but I didn't realize then," said Gravely, 62. "When I walked with somebody next to me, I'd find I was walking in front of them. I kept complaining that my car, which was new at the time, was pulling to the right." Gravely's motor skills were impaired because her cancer had metastasized to her brain. That same year she had brain surgery, which kept her away from the store she owns, Back

  • 7-year-old cancer survivor attends prom with sister

    7-year-old cancer survivor attends prom with...

    Updated: Sat, May 28, 2016

    ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — Heads turned as Sha'nayia Johnson walked through the Riverboat on the Potomac in a white satin gown with a long train and crystal accents winking under the lights. But attention soon turned to the dapper young man carrying the silky train. "You the man!" someone called as 7-year-old JJ Brown walked behind his sister. A group of women followed the tyke in the pale tuxedo. "What a cutie pie," one of the women exclaimed. Decked in an cream jacket, yellow shirt and white bow tie, JJ dutifully posed for pictures by his older sister's side at the restaurant and off-track betting facility on Saturday evening. The pair dressed up for Sha'nayia's high school prom, but the evening was a c

  • KRIS 6 meteorologist dies after cancer fight

    Updated: Fri, May 27, 2016

    KRIS 6 meteorologist Matt Terhune never dwelled on the issues that plagued him. Even after being diagnosed with brain cancer in 2007, he continued his on-camera duties while undergoing surgeries and multiple rounds of chemotherapy. Terhune's battle with cancer came to an end Friday morning when he died of the terminal illness. He was 39. Terhune stepped away from the camera last fall after his health continued to decline. Terhune spent his final days in Sinton with his wife, Michelle, and two children. "We've known for sometime this was inevitable," said KRIS 6 News Director Paul Alexander. "Even though we had time to prepare ourselves, it didn't make today any easier." Terhune had been with the NBC affiliate sinc

  • PRMC offers free skin cancer screening today

    Updated: Fri, May 27, 2016

    May is skin cancer awareness month and, in its efforts for community outreach, Peterson Regional Medical Center is offering two free screenings to the public starting today. Fred Speck, who performed 40 screenings for PRMC at a previous skin clinic on May 20, said it is vital for everyone to know their skin’s health. “Depending on the patient, some have checkups every three months,” Speck said. “The point is information is key, and the more the patient knows, the better educated they are.” According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, skin cancer is the uncontrolled growth of abnormal skin cells. This is most often caused by ultraviolet radiation from sunshine or tanning beds.

  • Cellphone radiation study raises concerns despite low risk

    Cellphone radiation study raises concerns...

    Updated: Fri, May 27, 2016

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A new federal study of the potential dangers of cellphone radiation, conducted in rats, found a slight increase in brain tumors in males and raised long-dormant concerns about the safety of spending so much time with cellphones glued to our ears. But the study had enough strange findings that it has caused other federal scientists to highlight flaws in the research, and experts said these findings and those from other studies continue to suggest the potential risk from cellphone radiation is very small. The National Institutes of Health study bombarded rats with cellphone radiation from the womb through the first two years of life for nine hours a day. It found tumors in 2 to 3 percent of male rats, which

  • Venezuelan boy's death sparks anger over health care crisis

    Venezuelan boy\'s death sparks anger over health...

    Updated: Fri, May 27, 2016

    CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — Venezuelans are expressing dismay over the death of an 8-year-old boy with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma who had become a symbol of the crisis-wracked nation's collapsed health care system. Oliver Sanchez gained fame in February when he appeared with his mother at a demonstration to protest medicine shortages wearing a mask and holding up a homemade sign reading, "I want a cure, peace and health." Sanchez died Tuesday, sparking outrage on social media and in congress. Opposition lawmakers in the National Assembly held up pictures of the second-grader to denounce what they called an avoidable death. A popular cartoonist dedicated a drawing to him dressed as an angel with a white dove in his hands.

  • Teen cancer survivor's wish to walk at graduation denied

    Teen cancer survivor\'s wish to walk at...

    Updated: Fri, May 27, 2016

    MESA, Ariz. (AP) — Some criticized a suburban Phoenix high school for not allowing a student diagnosed with cancer to walk with his graduating class after he worked to keep up with classes through treatment. Stephen Dwyer withdrew from school his junior year to receive a life-saving bone marrow transplant for leukemia. Dwyer, who is student body president, is 2 ½ credits short of graduating and will finish in December. A community Facebook page for Dwyer says the teen wanted to sit on the field in a cap and gown alongside his classmates Thursday but didn't ask to receive a diploma or even walk across the stage. After numerous meetings with the district superintendent and school board members, his request was denied.

  • Young mother steps in to solve problem for cancer patients

    Updated: Fri, May 27, 2016

    CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Amanda Rosen is a 24-year-old mother of two who has never had cancer. But when she heard about a problem some cancer patients were having, she came up with a solution to make their lives a little more comfortable. With help from donors and volunteers, she has produced and distributed more than 1,000 free “port pillows” — small wallet-size cushions that give patients relief from the pressure of across-the-shoulder seat belts. The need arises when patients who are having chemotherapy get a port — a catheter through which drugs are delivered. The port is usually installed in the chest, beneath the skin and near the shoulder, and stays there throughout therapy so patients don’t have to get needle-sti

  • Nonprofit announces $435,000 in cancer-fighting grants

    Updated: Thu, May 26, 2016

    The Austin-based cancer nonprofit Texas 4000 announced Thursday it would award eight grants worth a total of $435,000 to cancer-fighting organizations, including the University of Texas’ Department of Biomedical Engineering. The other seven grant winners were the M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston; The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, in Dallas; Brent’s Place and First Descents of Denver; Young Adult Cancer Canada in Nova Scotia; San Juan Regional Medical Foundation in Farmington, N.M; and Gundersen Health System in La Crosse, Wisconsin.

  • New study details how breast cancer diagnoses could be prevented or delayed

    Updated: Thu, May 26, 2016

    Ask almost any health-conscious woman who’s mustered under a giant pink ribbon, and she’ll tell you what an American woman’s chances are of getting breast cancer in her lifetime: 1 in 8. But that’s a national average. And as the relative influence of genes, behavior and environmental factors on cancer risk comes into clearer focus, women increasingly have begun to understand that they’re not all average. New research is helping to refine those numbers, and to clarify what it would take for a woman to reduce her risk of developing breast cancer. It concludes that, at some point in her life span, a 30-year-old white woman in the United States has a probability of developing breast cancer that lies somewhere between 4.

  • Quietly studying victims of the A-bomb

    Updated: Thu, May 26, 2016

    HIROSHIMA, Japan — Ikuko Murai remembers when the American Jeeps would come after school to take her and other young survivors to a lab at the top of a hill. This was the 1950s, just a few years after the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. “They examined my head and measured my height,” she said in an interview this week. “At that time, Japan still had nothing, so I still remember the candy they gave us, with Disney characters on the wrappers.” Murai had been an infant when the Enola Gay flew over Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945, unleashing the first nuclear weapon dropped in war.

  • EXCHANGE: Cancer surgeon opens holistic medicine clinic

    EXCHANGE: Cancer surgeon opens holistic...

    Updated: Thu, May 26, 2016

    ROCKFORD, Ill. (AP) — Dr. Elisha Robinson-Asiso recently opened Integrative Healing Center on Rockford's east side. The business' motto says it all: "Where traditional and alternative medicine meet." Robinson-Asiso said she doesn't treat diabetes, thyroid issues, high blood pressure or cardiac issues. She focuses on breast cancer patients. But this doctor focuses on the whole patient by using nutrition programs, ultrasounds, mammograms, MRIs, thermograms, genetic screening and, when needed, prescription medications. It seems like Robinson-Asiso, a married mother of two originally from Gary, Indiana, was destined for this moment in her life.

  • Teen fighting leukemia strives to make hospital a better place

    Updated: Thu, May 26, 2016

    A La Grange, Ill., teen who’s fighting leukemia is striving to make things better for herself and other young people facing illness, treatment and hospital stays. Katie Palermo, 17, a student at Lyons Township High School, suffered a relapse of leukemia two years ago and is continuing chemotherapy treatments at Ann and Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago. She was first diagnosed when she was 12. Palermo was recruited to take part in the hospital’s Kids Advisory Board, which allows children being treated at the hospital to provide input on how the hospital operates and meets their needs. The board has 10 members between the ages of 11 and 17 who’ve had significant experiences with the hospital.

  • St. Louis jury orders Monsanto to pay $46.5 million in latest PCB lawsuit

    Updated: Wed, May 25, 2016

    ST. LOUIS • A jury on Wednesday awarded $17.5 million in damages to three plaintiffs and assessed $29 million more in punitive damages against Monsanto and three other companies in a suit here alleging negligence in the production of PCBs. The 10-2 verdict in St. Louis Circuit Court ended a nearly-monthlong trial in one of a string of suits — some won by the defendants and some pending. This case, which went on trial April 28, involved just three of nearly 100 plaintiffs claiming that exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, caused non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Some died and their claims were made by surviving relatives.

  • Boulder teen Martha Riedel survives cancer, runs Bolder Boulder

    Updated: Wed, May 25, 2016

    When Martha Riedel was in the hospital, getting treatment for a rare form of childhood bone cancer, the Boulder teenager wrote a poem. Her words captured her spirit, and lifted the spirits of the people who loved her and were worried about her. Roses are red, My eyes are greenish-blue. Don't cry boo-hoo, 'Cuz I'm gonna live 'til 92. You will see that poem on the back of bright blue T-shirts in the Bolder Boulder this year. That's #TeamMartha, a crew of friends, family members and even hospital staff, all running (or walking) to raise awareness about childhood cancer — and celebrate Martha. She's running, too. Just months after finishing chemotherapy for the aggressive cancer.

  • Appeals court affirms 45-year sentence for cancer doctor

    Updated: Wed, May 25, 2016

    DETROIT (AP) — An appeals court has affirmed the 45-year prison sentence for a Detroit-area cancer doctor who put hundreds of patients through needless treatments. Farid Fata's appeal focused on how a judge calculated the sentencing guidelines and whether it was proper to allow many victims to speak in court. In a 3-0 decision Wednesday, the appeals court says the arguments lack merit. Fata pleaded guilty in 2014 to fraud, money laundering and conspiracy. The government identified 553 victims, along with insurance companies. Medicare and insurers paid at least $17 million. Many patients who were told they had cancer went through excessive chemotherapy. The treatments wrecked their health. Fata acknowledged that he was




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