• Former miler Steve Scott has prostate cancer

    Updated: Sat, Oct 18, 2014

    SAN MARCOS, Calif. (AP) — Former miler and Olympian Steve Scott has prostate cancer — 20 years after beating testicular cancer. The 58-year-old track and cross-country coach at Cal State San Marcos was diagnosed in June. Scott is undergoing proton therapy, a form of radiation treatment that kills cancer cells while preserving healthy surrounding tissue. He finishes his eight-week course in San Diego at the end of the month. During his treatment he has been able to coach and run three to five miles a day. His doctor described his prognosis as good to excellent. Scott is a member of the USA Track and Field Hall of Fame. He ran 136 competitive mile races in under 4 minutes, a feat that remains unmatched.

  • Fall River cancer center's chaplain helps patients

    Updated: Sat, Oct 18, 2014

    FALL RIVER, Mass. (AP) — A significant part of Marika Hull's role as a chaplain at the Saint Anne's Hospital Hudner Oncology Center in Fall River is to help cancer patients discover their inner strength. "The job of a chaplain is really fairly simple, and that is to be a good listener to the patient, and to help them find the threads of strength in their life somehow," said Hull, a Catholic chaplain who ministers to cancer patients from many different faith traditions. Hull, a former Sunday school teacher who became a chaplain about 12 years ago after embarking on a mid-life spiritual journey, said caring for the spirit is an integral component of people who are battling cancer. "The spirit, mind and body are one," Hu

  • Column: Finally, an inspiring story from sports

    Updated: Fri, Oct 17, 2014

    Jillion Potter thinks about it all the time. The Rio Olympics. The dream of climbing the podium with the rest of the U.S. rugby team to have a medal draped around her neck. "There's no doubt in my mind it's still possible," she says toward the end of a phone call Friday, before she gets back to building some shelves in her Denver home with help from a teammate. "But," she quickly adds, "I don't want to be naive about it either." Potter, you see, is battling an even tougher opponent than anyone she might go against in Brazil, where rough-and-tumble rugby will be making its return as an Olympic sport in 2016. A dreaded adversary, a foe that draws a shudder anytime it's mentioned, one so feared that many people refer

  • Wisconsin woman charged in fake cancer case

    Updated: Fri, Oct 17, 2014

    SPRING GREEN, Wis. (AP) — Wisconsin authorities filed charges against a woman who they say raised more than $50,000 from charities and individuals by faking a cancer diagnosis. Theresa Strub, 29, of Lone Rock was charged Wednesday in Richland and Sauk counties this week with eight felonies and three misdemeanors. Most of the charges are associated with false representation less than or equal to $2,500. Strub was arrested after an eight-month investigation involving two county sheriff's departments, Spring Green police and the state Division of Criminal Investigation. Strub used online campaigns and benefit days at local restaurants to raise money, investigators said. "This individual preyed on the good nature of our c

  • Free legal help offered for cancer patients

    Updated: Fri, Oct 17, 2014

    LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Residents in cancer treatment or who have completed treatment are invited to receive free legal assistance covering several important personal documents at an upcoming event. The legal aid event is set Oct. 22 at the Winthrop P. Rockefeller Cancer Institute at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences. Lawyers will assist cancer patients and survivors in preparing simple wills, powers of attorney and advance directives. It's is a free service provided by the Arkansas Access to Justice Commission, Center for Arkansas Legal Services, local law firms, members of the Pulaski County Bar Association and the UALR Bowen School of Law. Advance reservations are required at www.arlegalservice

  • Son says coach Wayne McClain died of lung cancer

    Updated: Thu, Oct 16, 2014

    CHAMPAIGN (AP) — The son of former Illinois assistant basketball coach Wayne McClain says his father suffered from lung cancer. It was an illness the family knew nothing of until the coach was hospitalized. Sergio McClain told the News-Gazette in Champaign (http://bit.ly/1ocsIgE ) his father, who died Wednesday at 59, authored a daily blog on his cellphone. It was from the device the family learned of the lung cancer. McClain was an assistant coach at Illinois from 2002 through 2012. McClain made his reputation as a coach at Peoria Manual High School. He won state titles there in his first three seasons in the mid-1990s. McClain returned to Champaign-Urbana in the spring of 2013 after one season on Bruce Weber's

  • New breast cancer Washington license plates

    Updated: Wed, Oct 15, 2014

    OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — A new special license plate going on sale in Washington will feature a pink ribbon and promote breast cancer awareness. The plates were approved by the Legislature and will go on sale generally in January for $60 through the Department of Licensing. In a special promotion the first 18 breast cancer plates are being auctioned to help pay for screenings for women without insurance. The online auction runs through October. ___ http://www.32auctions.

  • Forum to focus on workplace breast cancer support

    Updated: Wed, Oct 15, 2014

    MARIETTA, Ga. (AP) — An event in metro Atlanta is aimed at teaching employers what they can do to support working women who are battling breast cancer. The nonprofit Georgia Breast Cancer Coalition Fund is hosting the Breast Cancer in the Workplace Forum Wednesday at The Mansour Center in Marietta. Director of the Georgia Breast Cancer Coalition Fund, Amy Upchurch, said in a release that despite advances in treatment, a breast cancer diagnosis still means a long-term and complicated battle for many women. Upchurch says the organization's goal is to educate employers on how they can support workers through every stage of their fight against breast cancer.

  • Arizona agrees to settle prison health care suit

    Updated: Tue, Oct 14, 2014

    PHOENIX (AP) — Arizona officials agreed to settle a class-action lawsuit filed on behalf of 33,000 inmates after some complained that their cancer went undetected or they were told to pray to be cured after begging for treatment. Without acknowledging any wrongdoing, state officials agreed to seek more money from the Legislature to increase health care staffing, offer cancer screenings to certain prisoners, follow requirements in treating patients with chronic diseases, and provide more out-of-cell time to prisoners kept in isolated cells.

  • Slive to retire as SEC commissioner in July

    Updated: Tue, Oct 14, 2014

    Southeastern Conference Commissioner Mike Slive will retire next summer after 13 years leading the league to unprecedented success and prosperity. The 74-year-old Slive said his retirement will take effect July 31, and also announced he plans to begin treatment for a recurrence of prostate cancer. Slive has become one of the most powerful figures in college sports. Under his leadership, the SEC became the nation's most premier football conference, dug out from under a pile of NCAA compliance issues and won seven consecutive BCS titles. Overall, the SEC won 67 national championships in 15 of its 21 sponsored sports since he took over in 2002.

  • Recent editorials published in Iowa newspapers

    Updated: Mon, Oct 13, 2014

    Iowa City Press-Citizen. Oct. 9, 2014. Collateral damage in the UI-ISU-UNI enrollment war Go up to the fifth floor of the University of Iowa Main Library and start walking through the stacks of the Government Information section. If you're patient — and if you're willing to look through a few misfiled documents — you'll eventually come upon 17-R333 7:U58. At first, you might not take much notice of the four-page pamphlet, which was printed in 1982 under the title, "Iowa's Universities: Our Best Hope." Yet the 32-year-old document is proof that — at least at one time — the Iowa state Board of Regents advocated for the needs of all three public universities jointly, rather than pitting each university against the

  • Ex-employee sentenced for theft from nonprofit

    Updated: Sun, Oct 12, 2014

    UPPER MARLBORO, Md. (AP) — A former employee of a Washington-based organization that funds cancer research has been sentenced to jail time for stealing from the nonprofit and its donors. Thirty-nine-year-old Ilyona Carter was sentenced to serve six months in jail followed by five years of probation on Friday. Prosecutors say Carter stole more than $25,000 from Melanoma Research Alliance, where she was an operations manager, and people who donated to the charity. In August Carter pleaded guilty in Prince George's County Circuit Court to theft of over $10,000 and identity theft of more than $500.

  • GRU Cancer Center gets $2.3M research award

    Updated: Sat, Oct 11, 2014

    AUGUSTA, Ga. (AP) — A researcher at Georgia Regents University's Cancer Center has received a $2.3 million research award. The National Institute of Health awarded Dr. Satyanarayana Ande funding over five years. Andre's work examines the depletion of fat deposits within the body.

  • Woman with cancer plans to take her life in Oregon

    Updated: Thu, Oct 9, 2014

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Brittany Maynard will not live to see if her advocacy makes a difference. The 29-year-old woman expects to die next month. If the brain cancer from which she suffers does not kill her in October, she plans to take advantage of Oregon's Death with Dignity Act and end her own life on the first of November — a few days after her husband's 43rd birthday. Her birthday is Nov. 19. "That would have been my 30th birthday," she said in an interview Wednesday. "As of right now, I don't know that I'm going to make it to my 30th birthday, and that's a really difficult thing to process emotionally.

  • Woman with cancer plans to take her life in Oregon

    Updated: Wed, Oct 8, 2014

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Brittany Maynard will not live to see if her advocacy makes a difference. The 29-year-old woman expects to die next month. If the brain cancer from which she suffers does not kill her in October, she plans to take advantage of Oregon's Death with Dignity Act and end her own life on the first of November — a few days after her husband's 43rd birthday. Her birthday is Nov. 19. "That would have been my 30th birthday," she said in an interview Wednesday. "As of right now, I don't know that I'm going to make it to my 30th birthday, and that's a really difficult thing to process emotionally.

  • Construction to start on Don Meyer cancer center

    Updated: Wed, Oct 8, 2014

    ABERDEEN, S.D. (AP) — Officials are starting work on a cancer center that will be named for legendary college basketball coach Don Meyer and his wife. Avera St. Luke's Hospital in Aberdeen held a ceremonial groundbreaking Tuesday for the $13.5 million Don and Carmen Meyer Center of Excellence, which will be home to the Avera Cancer Institute. Construction is to begin next week and take about a year. The facility will have 27,500 square feet on a single floor, nearly triple the size of the current cancer facility at the hospital. It could be expanded to four floors in the future. It will be outfitted with state-of-the-art equipment and will expand available services.

  • LePage recognizing Breast Cancer Awareness Month

    Updated: Wed, Oct 8, 2014

    AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — Maine Gov. Paul LePage is planting pink tulips to raise awareness for breast cancer. The Republican governor will deliver remarks and plant flowers at the Maine Department of Transportation headquarters on Wednesday to honor Breast Cancer Awareness Month. LePage will be joined by chief engineer for DOT, Joyce Taylor, who is undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer and will be informing Mainers about the importance of early detection. LePage says in a statement that Mainers must get checked regularly and urges people to support those who have to battle with the disease until a cure is found.

  • NW Iowa state Rep. Alons says he has renal cancer

    Updated: Tue, Oct 7, 2014

    DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — State Rep. Dwayne Alons says he has been diagnosed with renal cancer but plans to continue to serve in the Legislature. Alons, a Republican from Hull, announced his diagnosis in a news release Tuesday. He says he had cancer in his left kidney and will undergo treatment in the fall. He thanked his family for their support and expressed a desire to continue working on behalf of Sioux County. Alons is running unopposed for a ninth term. He is a retired farmer and former Iowa Air National Guard brigadier general.

  • Sewing group makes bears for breast cancer walk

    Updated: Tue, Oct 7, 2014

    FORT WAYNE, Ind. (AP) — It all started with a purple bear. When Dee McCrea's mother died last Christmas, McCrea immortalized her mother by turning her clothes into stuffed bears, which she then gave to family members to help remember her. The bear McCrea kept was made from a pair of her mother's pajamas, with a pink ribbon around the neck and pink flower-shaped buttons. A year later, members of Stitch and Chatter, a sewing and fellowship group at Bethel United Methodist that McCrea attended, were trying to figure out what their group project should be. In past years, they'd just brought bits of sewing that they had as personal projects. "We found we really needed a purpose," McCrea tells The News-Sentinel (http://bit.

  • Jazz sign 5-year-old with leukemia for scrimmage

    Updated: Tue, Oct 7, 2014

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — The Utah Jazz signed a 5-year-old boy with leukemia to a one-day contract for a special scrimmage on Monday night. JP Gibson, who was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, signed his contract with Jazz President Randy Rigby before joining the team in uniform for the annual preseason intrasquad scrimmage at EnergySolutions Arena. JP was joined by his parents, Josh and Megan, and his 2-year-old sister, Elsie. The family was hosted by the Jazz and photographer Jon Diaz's "Anything Can Be" project that creates storybooks for children with cancer about their dreams and wishes. JP, wearing a No. 1 jersey, even got to play in the scrimmage.