• bc-abby adv13 08-3

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    FROM UNIVERSAL UCLICK FOR RELEASE: THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2015 DEAR ABBY by Abigail Van Buren FORWARD THINKING CAN HELP PARENTS DEAL WITH CANCER ****** ****** COPYRIGHT 2015 UNIVERSAL UCLICK 1130 Walnut, Kansas City, MO 64106; 816-581-7500

  • Cincinnati Children's gets 125-ton cancer treating equipment

    Yesterday

    LIBERTY TWP., Ohio (AP) — A more than 125-ton piece of medical equipment is in the process of making its way to the Liberty Campus of Cincinnati Children's Hospital. The first piece of the hospital's cyclotron was expected to arrive by the end of July, according to the Dayton Daily News (http://bit.ly/1KFvT7A) . The equipment powers proton laser beams that fight pediatric cancer. Proton therapy is a form of radiation used to treat certain types of cancers and lymphomas. There is more precision in proton therapy's ability to deliver radiation than traditional radiation, which helps avoid exposure to surrounding healthy tissue and reduce side effects. A second piece will arrive on the back of a special multi-axle traile

  • Chiefs safety Eric Berry is cancer-free, but he won’t forget those who have it worse

    Yesterday

    Before Eric Berry heard the best news of his life, he went to visit some strangers. He knew they had it worse. He thought he could help. Hoped he could, anyway. That was enough. So the most famous cancer patient in the NFL went to Children’s Mercy Hospital to speak with children fighting chronic and life-altering diseases, and their parents. Berry, the Chiefs’ All-Pro safety, and his mother did it in such a low-profile way that some at the hospital who work to set things like this up did not know about the visit until they were contacted for this story. You know some of it. The other day, Berry announced to the world that he is cancer free, just eight months after being diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma. His mother sa

  • Former Tuttle, Oklahoma State standout Cooper Bassett still shares special bond with 9-year-old Taylor Brandt

    BY JENNI CARLSON | Published: Sat, Aug 1, 2015

    The picture was among the hundreds snapped the night of Cooper Bassett's wedding. None had any more love in them. In the picture, you can see the former Tuttle High football standout turned Oklahoma State football standout. He is hugging a little girl. She has oodles of curly red hair. She is wearing a sparkly purple dress. You can't see her face, but you can see his. And in his expression, you can sense how much Cooper Bassett and Taylor Brandt love each other. She is his Taylor, and he is her Cooper. Still. They met four years ago at one of OSU's Coaches vs. Cancer events. He was a hulking lineman. She was a frail cancer kid. They became fast friends, and about a year later, we told their

  • Clemson pitcher Schmidt eager to bounce back from lymphoma

    Updated: Sat, Aug 1, 2015

    COLUMBIA, S.C. (AP) — Clate Schmidt felt tired last winter, more tired than a 21-year-old college athlete should be. The Clemson pitcher wasn't overly concerned, until he discovered a lump on his neck while showering in January. After telling his family, Schmidt underwent several months of testing before the frightening diagnosis was revealed — Schmidt had nodular sclerosis, a form of Hodgkin's lymphoma the junior acknowledged knocked him off stride. "For the first time in a long time, I broke down," Schmidt said. "I went through a depression, I mean like for 15 or 20 minutes." After that, Schmidt's well-honed competitive juices kicked in as if he were striding to the mound to face Florida State or Miami in a crucia

  • The Kansas City Star Sam Mellinger column

    Updated: Sat, Aug 1, 2015

    Before Eric Berry heard the best news of his life, he went to visit some strangers. He knew they had it worse. He thought he could help. Hoped he could, anyway. That was enough. So the most famous cancer patient in the NFL went to Children’s Mercy Hospital to speak with children fighting chronic and life-altering diseases, and their parents. Berry, the Chiefs’ All-Pro safety, and his mother did it in such a low-profile way that some at the hospital who work to set things like this up did not know about the visit until they were contacted for this column. You know some of this story. The other day, Berry announced to the world that he is cancer free, just eight months after being diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma. Hi

  • Camp Noogie helps children cope with relatives' cancer

    Updated: Sat, Aug 1, 2015

    For half an hour, the magician seemed to make the kids forget the disease. The children sat amongst tables strewn with doughnuts and crayons in the Cancer Support Community North Texas “clubhouse” on Friday — directly below the room where their family members go for cancer treatment. The kids and their families celebrated the last day of Camp Noogie, a free weeklong camp for kids affected by cancer. For the last five years, campers have gathered in the clubhouse every summer to play, make friends and heal. “Cancer affects the whole family,” said Mirchelle Lewis, who directs the cancer organization, which offers free support and education. “And kids have a harder time understanding and articulating their feel

  • Residents express concerns about new water meters

    Updated: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    SILVER CITY >> Silver City residents expressed their concerns on Tuesday about possible health issues arising from the smart water meters the town plans on installing. "The World Health Organization has issued concerns about the harmful health effects of the radiation created by the meters," said resident Eric Lynch. He noted that several communities in California have banned the automatic read meters due to health-related concerns. Lynch was speaking to the Silver City Town Council during their regular meeting on Tuesday. The city recently approved financing to replace the city's old water meters with electronic meters that broadcast the meter readings.

  • Ex-hospital tech charged with performing faulty cancer tests

    Updated: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — A former Pennsylvania hospital employee has been indicted on charges he performed flawed genetic tests on 124 late-stage cancer patients and then lied about it. Federal prosecutors in Harrisburg said Friday that 60-year-old Floyd Benko, of Palmyra, has been charged with health care fraud and making false statements. Court documents say Benko failed to perform the gene mutation tests correctly and lied to administrators at Hershey Medical Center about how he conducted the tests. The tests help doctors formulate treatment plans. Hershey officials have said the faulty tests affected the treatment plans of about a dozen patients. Benko surrendered Friday. He pleaded not guilty and was re

  • Tennessee Daily Life

    Updated: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    Campers and camp councelors play nine square in the air at Camp Wesley Woods and East Tennessee Children's Hospital's "Camp Eagles Nest" on Friday, July 31, 2015 near Walland, Tenn. The hematology/oncology patients ranging from elementary age to high-schoolers, were part of an annual event that’s been taking place for the last 30 or more years.

  • Ice caps near FDA approval to prevent hair loss during chemotherapy

    Updated: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    PITTSBURGH — As a baby, Kim Nyalka’s now 7-year-old daughter would twist her fingers through her mother’s hair as she fell asleep, and playing with her mother’s hair is still a treasured habit. So when Nyalka found out that she’d have to have chemotherapy for breast cancer, she started first looking into wigs, and then into scalp cooling — a treatment that uses cold caps on the head to prevent hair loss during chemo — to make the process less traumatic for her family. A year into her chemotherapy treatments, Nyalka, 47, of Whitehall, Penn., has indeed kept her hair.

  • Joe Arrington Cancer Center employee reflects on facility's 20 years

    Updated: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    Shelly Biggs remembers the appointment well. She’d been going through her usual workday when one of her regular patients caught her off guard. Roxie Taylor was one of the first administrators of the Joe Arrington Cancer Center, Biggs said. She was diagnosed with breast cancer and sought treatment at the place where Biggs was working. Biggs is a radiation therapist and the director of the JACC. She’d delivered radiation treatments to Taylor and she also treated Joe Arrington. On the last day of Taylor’s treatment, Taylor offered Biggs a job. Development of the JACC was underway, Biggs said. “She said, ‘Would you like a job?’ ” Biggs recalled.

  • Relay for Life gets financial boost

    Updated: Thu, Jul 30, 2015

    Add $5,000 to the financial fight against cancer. Relay for Life, a fundraising organization associated with the American Cancer Society, received a check for $5,000 from McAlester Regional Health Center Wednesday morning. “(Relay for Life) is one of the major fundraisers for the American Cancer Society,” said Marcy Beeman, senior manager of Relay for Life in eastern Oklahoma. “Research, education, advocacy and patient services are the four areas money raised through Relay for Life goes to.” Relay for Life fundraises through many methods, including team fundraisers, games, T-shirt sales, bake sales and more. MRHC added its $5,000 donation to the effort.

  • Feds says more than $13 million recovered from rogue doctor

    Updated: Thu, Jul 30, 2015

    DETROIT (AP) — The government says $13 million to $14 million has been recovered so far from a Detroit-area cancer doctor who gave unnecessary treatments to patients. Federal prosecutor Catherine Dick says victims will be first in line to get some compensation from the assets of Dr. Farid Fata. But she says the process will be "extremely complex" and will need help from a professional. Dick gave an update Thursday to a federal judge, three weeks after Fata was sentenced to 45 years in prison for fraud and other crimes. There are more than 500 victims. The government says they will eligible for some money for out-of-pocket health expenses as well as reimbursement for problems due to his fraudulent care.

  • Only small increase in US girls getting cervical cancer shot

    Updated: Thu, Jul 30, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — More U.S. girls are getting a controversial vaccine, but the increase last year was only slight. A national survey released Thursday found 60 percent of adolescent girls received at least one of three doses of the vaccine against human papillomavirus, or HPV. It was 57 percent in 2013. For boys, the rate was 42 percent, up from 34 percent. The vaccine has been available to girls since 2006 but has been recommended for boys since 2011. It protects against cervical cancer and genital warts. The shots are recommended at age 11 or 12, to protect youths before they start to have sex. Health officials say not enough pediatricians are strongly recommending HPV shots. Vaccination rates against other dise

  • Kim Garcia: Cancer survivor to firefighter

    Updated: Thu, Jul 30, 2015

    HICKORY GROVE – After surviving breast cancer, Kim Garcia wanted to give back to the group of men who unselfishly looked after her during the darkest season of her life. Garcia, an accomplished baker who likes to create specialty cakes, first started donating items to Hickory Grove Rural Fire Department’s fundraising bake sales. Then she decided to become a firefighter. “This fire department was overwhelmingly supportive and I wanted to give back,” Garcia said. She signed up as a volunteer firefighter with the Hickory Grove Rural Fire Department in 2013. Three months ago, Garcia reached the rank of Captain, and two months ago, she was promoted to Assistant Fire Chief, the first female officer for the 19-me

  • Sam Mellinger: Having beaten cancer, no telling what Chiefs’ Berry can do now

    Updated: Thu, Jul 30, 2015

    ST. JOSEPH, Mo. — There is no wrong way to fight cancer. Not if your mind is right, anyway. Eric Berry, one of the Chiefs’ and NFL’s best young players, knows this now. That wasn’t always true, of course. In the beginning, in those strange and foggy first days when the cancer diagnosis still felt like someone else’s reality, Berry wasn’t sure he had this fight in him. He didn’t know where to start. Berry learned by error. In the beginning, he thought about it all wrong. How do you fight for your life when you’re not sure you can get out of bed? You can’t, not really, which is why he ended up in tears over breakfast with his dad one day.

  • Research finally increasing on rare asbestos-related lung cancer

    Updated: Thu, Jul 30, 2015

    BALTIMORE — While the use of asbestos peaked about 40 years ago, the number of cases of the rare but deadly cancer it causes has not declined. Every year, doctors diagnose about 3,000 new cases of mesothelioma after patients come in with a cough, fever, fatigue, excessive sweating and pain in the chest. In most cases the disease already has advanced so far that patients will die in a matter of months. Treatment is primarily palliative — meant to ease the suffering — but that may be changing. Doctors see hope as interest in the disease has grown. There are at least 20 clinical trials underway, and the FDA recently gave a special designation to a new drug created by AstraZeneca’s Rockville, Md., subsidiary MedIumm

  • Cancer-free Berry returns to practice field

    Updated: Wed, Jul 29, 2015

    All-pro safety Eric Berry has picked off the likes of Michael Vick and Phillip Rivers and has tackled 200-pound running backs. But that was nothing compared to the fight he had against cancer. Berry was physically and mentally drained for months. Then something happened. He was cancer free and back on the field after 267 days. “My whole thing was that it’s going to be what it’s going to be at that point,” Berry said. “I’m going to control what I can control and the two things I could control was my attitude and my effort. I just tried to go out and wake up every day and try to build off whatever I did the day before. “I was at a lost for words. I was so excited.

  • bc-abby adv13 07-29

    Updated: Wed, Jul 29, 2015

    FROM UNIVERSAL UCLICK FOR RELEASE: THURSDAY, AUGUST 13, 2015 DEAR ABBY by Abigail Van Buren FORWARD THINKING CAN HELP PARENTS DEAL WITH CANCER ****** ****** COPYRIGHT 2015 UNIVERSAL UCLICK 1130 Walnut, Kansas City, MO 64106; 816-581-7500




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