• Patients will have their say at sentencing for cancer doc

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    DETROIT (AP) — Patients and their relatives will be giving an earful to a Detroit-area cancer doctor who admits ordering excessive treatments to get millions of dollars from insurers. Roughly two dozen victims are signed up to give statements Tuesday in Detroit federal court. It's all part of the sentencing for Dr. Farid (Fa-REED') Fata, who pleaded guilty last year to fraud, money laundering and conspiracy. The government says more than 500 people received unnecessary treatments from Fata, including some people who didn't have cancer. Prosecutors are seeking a 175-year prison sentence, while the Oakland County man is asking for no more than 25 years. The punishment is expected later this week. On Monday, Harvard medi

  • 'Stunning' number of large drug doses by doctor, expert says

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    DETROIT (AP) — Patients of a Detroit-area doctor received "stunning" doses of a powerful, expensive drug that exposed them to life-threatening infections, an expert testified Monday as a judge heard details about a cancer specialist who fleeced insurance companies and harmed hundreds of people. Dr. Farid Fata is headed to prison for fraud and other crimes. But U.S. District Judge Paul Borman first is hearing from experts and former patients about the extent of his scheme to reap millions of dollars from Medicare and other health programs. Nearly three dozen ex-patients and family members, many dressed in black, chartered a bus to attend the hearing, which could last days. Some will testify Tuesday.

  • Study adds to doubt on value of mammogram cancer screening

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    The increased use of mammograms to screen for breast cancer has subjected more women to invasive medical treatments but has not saved lives, a new study says. After reviewing cancer registry records from 547 counties across the United States, researchers concluded that the screening tests aren’t working as hoped. Instead of preventing deaths by uncovering breast tumors at an early, more curable stage, screening mammograms have mainly found small tumors that would have been harmless if left alone. “The clearest result of mammography screening is the diagnosis of additional small cancers,” researchers reported Monday in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. “These findings suggest widespread overdiagnosis.

  • Medical miracles: Cutting-edge procedure targets tumor in teen

    Updated: 11 hr ago

    Bryant Bray wasn’t worried when he was diagnosed with a benign tumor in his nasal passage. He had already been misdiagnosed with a nasal infection a few months before he was correctly diagnosed, so Bray was more relieved that it could finally be treated. “Over time, it made it so I couldn’t breath out of my nose, and it was pushing my pallet down into my mouth,” said Bray. But then, the tumor came back. “That part really did mess with me a bit,” said Bray. Earlier that year Bray, an 18-year-old resident of Tahlequah, was having problems with his nose. A doctor in Moore diagnosed him with a nasal infection. He was prescribed five different nasal sprays, but none of them would go up his nose.

  • Ill children to get safe place to play in healing center

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) — The first year-round recreational center in the nation specifically designed for kids coping with cancer or serious illness will open in September in Grand Rapids. The Children's Healing Center is designed to provide a germ-free environment where kids can play, run around and have fun with their families. The vision for the center was led by Amanda Winn, a young architect and cancer survivor who saw a need for a place where sick kids can just be kids, according to The Grand Rapids Press ( http://bit.ly/1IfIb7i ). A team of volunteers, donors, medical professionals and families came together to meet that need. "This will truly be the first of its kind," said Dr.

  • Study suggests which glioblastoma patients may benefit from drug treatment

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Clinicians testing the drug dasatinib, approved for several blood cancers, had hoped it would slow the aggressive growth of the deadly brain cancer glioblastoma. While clinical trials to date have not found any benefit, researchers at Mayo Clinic, who conducted one of those clinical trials, believe they know why dasatinib failed — and what to do about it. In the online issue of Molecular Oncology, investigators report finding that dasatinib inhibits proteins that promote cancer growth as expected but also suppresses proteins that protect against cancer. The findings suggest that pretesting patient glioblastoma biopsies will help identify who may respond well to dasatinib and who should avoid using the

  • Radiation errors investigated at St. Cloud cancer center

    Updated: Sat, Jul 4, 2015

    ST. CLOUD, Minn. (AP) — An internal investigation has found that some patients at the CentraCare Health Coborn Cancer Center in St. Cloud received improper doses of radiation, resulting in discipline and firings of some employees. CentraCare President and CEO Ken Holmen told the St. Cloud Times that the errors affected "a small group" of patients. He wouldn't give a number but said they've all been contacted. He also would not say how many employees have been disciplined or fired, but said they included people with leadership roles in the radiation oncology department. Holmen said most of the affected patients didn't get enough radiation, meaning a small increase in the chance of a recurrence of their cancer.

  • Auburn firefighter donates bone marrow to save patient

    Updated: Sat, Jul 4, 2015

    AUBURN, Ala. (AP) — As a firefighter, saving lives is included in the job description. But for Auburn firefighter Stephen Bradford, this life-saving initiative extends beyond rescuing people from smoke and flames. "We readily get to help people with what we do on a daily basis," said Deputy Chief Matthew Jordan with the Auburn Fire Division. "This is above and beyond the call of duty on that. We are proud that he took this upon himself." Last Friday, Bradford, 23, underwent surgery in Washington, D.C., to donate his bone marrow to a leukemia patient whom Bradford has never met.

  • Marshall neuroscience chief jumped at chance to hire surgeon

    Updated: Sat, Jul 4, 2015

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — Marshall University has recruited a noted surgeon who ran into trouble experimenting with human brains using bowel bacteria but will continue the same research on rats under tight restrictions. Dr. Paul Muizelaar and another doctor left the University of California, Davis, in 2013 after officials concluded their actions violated the school's code of conduct. Muizelaar had been the university's neurosurgery chief for 15 years. At Marshall University in Huntington, neuroscience chief Dr. Anthony Alberico's interest in recommending Muizelaar's hiring last year was based in part on the sports analogy that if a star free agent is available, go after him.

  • Right to die: Colombian man ends life with government backup

    Updated: Sat, Jul 4, 2015

    BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — Dr. Gustavo Quintana walks out of a modest, two-floor apartment building in southern Bogota. Inside his black doctor's bag are vials containing anesthesia and muscle relaxants, a syringe and a rubber tourniquet. The man known in Colombia as Dr. Death has just ended the life of his 234th patient: a middle-aged woman suffering from incurable stomach cancer. For years, Quintana and a handful of other physicians have been performing what they consider mercy killings in a semi-clandestine state, at risk of prosecution and amid widespread rejection from other doctors and church officials.

  • In death, Nebraska girl helps Pennsylvania boys live on

    Updated: Fri, Jul 3, 2015

    PITTSBURGH (AP) — A Nebraska girl who died of brain cancer Tuesday at age 3 helped save the lives of two Pennsylvania children through organ donation. Olivia Swedberg's mother reached out to the family of 2-year-old Lucas Goeller through Facebook telling them she wanted to give him Olivia's liver. Lucas, of Indiana Township, a suburb of Pittsburgh, had been waiting more than 18 months for a lifesaving transplant. "It's so hard to describe," Lauressa Swedberg, 31, of North Platte, Nebraska, told the Tribune-Review. "I am this mourning mother, but I also feel wonderful to know she is living on. I feel so grateful because I now know that she was here for a purpose — to save others." Doctors diagnosed Olivia in May with

  • Feds say cancer doc wants 25-year sentence for fraud

    Updated: Fri, Jul 3, 2015

    DETROIT (AP) — A Detroit-area cancer doctor who admits reaping millions of dollars through unnecessary treatments is asking a judge to sentence him to no more than 25 years in prison. Dr. Farid Fata's sentencing memo is sealed in Detroit federal court. But his request for a 25-year sentence was disclosed by prosecutors Thursday in a court filing. The government repeated its call for a 175-year sentence. Prosecutors say Fata's "ultimate goal was to maximize his profit on the backs of his patients." A sentencing hearing begins Monday and could last at least a week. Fata pleaded guilty to fraud last September, admitting he billed insurers for millions of dollars while treating patients with chemotherapy and other methods

  • EDITORIAL: Glad to see U.S. Army Corps of Engineers extend NISP comment period; thanks to brave mommas for battling childhood cancer

    Updated: Fri, Jul 3, 2015

    We were glad to see the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers extend the deadline for public comment on a key part of the Northern Integrated Supply Project by 30 days. All written comments on the corps’ supplemental draft environmental impact statement on the northern Colorado water supply project must be submitted to the corps by Sept. 3. Initially, the corps only gave residents 45 days to submit comments. However, corps officials pushed it back on Tuesday to a total of 75 days. The statement was released June 19. Two meetings have been scheduled to hear public feedback. One will take place at 5 p.m. July 22 at the Hilton Fort Collins, 425 W. Prospect Road in Fort Collins. The second will happen at 5 p.m. July 23 at the Weld Count

  • Community rallied for neighbor with cancer, raised $14K

    Updated: Fri, Jul 3, 2015

    Tricia “Trish” Story was a bright spot in the many lives she touched. At the end of April, that bright person was touched by something most have a connection to – cancer. According to Shawna Randall, a family friend and neighbor, it was stage 4 cervical cancer. The wheels started turning in Randall’s mind on how to help her friend and neighbor, who was without insurance and had a battle ahead. Originally, Randall had organized a spaghetti dinner first and planned an auction to follow to raise funds for the Storys. But Tricia never got to see her community pull together for her. “She passed away the Tuesday before the Saturday dinner,” Randall said. “She basically found out, lived a month and pa

  • ‘If Cancer Was A Fish’ picture book is meant to help kids cope with tragedy

    Updated: Thu, Jul 2, 2015

    If cancer was a fish, Tiffany Berg Coughran and her five kids would definitely throw it back. That’s the visual Coughran conjured up several years ago when her husband, Paul Berg, was diagnosed with oral cancer. It became a short story, illustrated with clip art, that she wrote for her nieces and nephews and later shared with her own children. “The thing that was so hard in our home is that it was so quiet at that time,” Coughran said. “The kids weren’t really talking anymore, and it was very somber around our house and I really wanted them to be able to share what was going on. I was afraid because they weren’t talking.

  • Maryland governor out of hospital after 1st round of chemo

    Updated: Thu, Jul 2, 2015

    ANNAPOLIS, Md. (AP) — Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan is out of the hospital and back at work after his first round of chemotherapy for an aggressive form of cancer. Hogan posted messages on social media Thursday saying, "It feels great to be back in Annapolis!" He posted that he spent the morning catching up with staff and working. The first-term Republican governor spent five days at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore, receiving treatment for B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. When he announced the diagnosis June 22, he said the disease was at an advanced stage but his prognosis was good. New Jersey governor and Republican presidential candidate Chris Christie says he and Hogan talked almost every day

  • Mom gets perfect haircut before chemo treatment

    Published: Thu, Jul 2, 2015

    Sarah’s mom knew the chemotherapy treatments would claim her hair. In an effort to make light of a very heavy situation, she gave Sarah free reign to give her the coolest haircut she could come up with, Yahoo Makers reports. “My mom asked me for something fun to play with before chemo takes her hair,” Sarah posted on Reddit under her username, borrow_a_feeling. The post quickly became a trending item on the site, with commenters weighing in with support and admiration. 

  • ‘Fighter’ Charlie Sanders still trying to kick cancer’s butt

    Updated: Thu, Jul 2, 2015

    Hall-of-Fame tight end Charlie Sanders has undergone multiple rounds of chemotherapy in his battle with cancer, but family members say the long-time Detroit Lion is staying upbeat in his fight. “Just as on the field, Charlie Sanders is a fighter and he is going to fight to the end like any game, like any journey,” Sanders’ daughter, Charese Sailor, said on behalf of the family. “We are rallying around him and supporting him in that fight, and until God says differently, we’re going to push on.” Doctors diagnosed Sanders with cancer last November after they found a malignant tumor behind his right knee while he was being prepped for knee replacement surgery.

  • Women need latest technology for prevention of breast cancer

    Updated: Wed, Jul 1, 2015

    With an identical twin who’s been married 30 years to a great guy and successful entrepreneur with lovely homes near Boston, on Cape Cod, in San Diego and Fort Myers, Fla., I often joke that I now get the commandment “Thou shall not covet.” But I’m not kidding when I say I plan to fight for one advantage enjoyed by my sister, to which I believe all of us Oklahoma women — happily married, cash-strapped or otherwise — are entitled. That’s 3-D mammography, or digital breast tomosynthesis, which is the very latest technology in the detection of breast cancer. At my recent annual breast screening, I agreed to pay an additional $53 out of pocket to have a 3-D vs. 2-D mammogram because my insurance company doesn’t ye

  • Women need latest technology for prevention of breast cancer

    Updated: Wed, Jul 1, 2015

    With an identical twin who’s been married 30 years to a great guy and successful entrepreneur with lovely homes near Boston, on Cape Cod, in San Diego and Fort Myers, Fla., I often joke that I now get the commandment “Thou shall not covet.” But I’m not kidding when I say I plan to fight for one advantage enjoyed by my sister, to which I believe all of us Oklahoma women — happily married, cash-strapped or otherwise — are entitled. That’s 3-D mammography, or digital breast tomosynthesis, which is the very latest technology in the detection of breast cancer. At my recent annual breast screening, I agreed to pay an additional $53 out of pocket to have a 3-D vs. 2-D mammogram because my insurance company doesn’t ye




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