• Cancer-stricken Marian fan gets help from Irsay

    Yesterday

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — An 11-year-old southern Indiana boy battling cancer will watch his adopted Marian Knights compete in the NAIA championship game in Daytona, Florida, thanks to the generosity of Indianapolis Colts owner Jim Irsay and ESPN college basketball analyst Dan Dakich. Irsay is letting Cole Winnefeld of Bedford and his parents use his private plane to fly to Florida after the boy missed the team's flight Monday because he was in Michigan receiving treatment for neuroblastoma, a nerve cell cancer. WTHR reports (http://bit.ly/1wWUSA5 ) Dakich, who has a sports talk show on WFNI in Indianapolis, had offered to donate $1,000 for plane tickets.

  • Ex-mayor Ford's cancerous tumor has shrunk in half

    Yesterday

    TORONTO (AP) — Former Toronto Mayor Rob Ford's cancerous tumor has shrunk in half with chemotherapy treatment, his brother said Tuesday. Doug Ford said the tumor — which doctors had initially said was 12 centimeters (4.7 inches) by 12 centimeters in size — is now down to 6 centimeters (2.4 inches) by 6 centimeters. Doug Ford says his brother will be finishing a fifth round of chemotherapy soon and will also get radiation treatment. Ford was diagnosed with a rare form of abdominal cancer called liposarcoma in September and dropped his bid for mayoral re-election shortly afterward. Instead, he ran for a seat on the city council and won. In late November, Rob Ford said his tumor had not shrunk, but had not gott

  • 10 most popular Google searches of 2014

    Richard Hall | Published: Tue, Dec 16, 2014

    Google has just shared what the top Internet searches of 2014 are, and none of them are too surprising. Google actually shares two lists: the searches that trended in the United States, and the searches that trended globally. This post will list both. Get to it! No. 10 – Ukraine Ukraine made headlines across the […]

  • Almost 80 percent of Oklahomans say they prefer smoke-free bars and nightclubs

    By Jaclyn Cosgrove, Staff Writer | Updated: Mon, Dec 15, 2014

    Free the Night, an Oklahoma campaign encouraging bars and clubs to voluntarily adopt smoke-free policies, announced Monday at a press conference at Grandad’s its survey results, documenting almost 2,000 Oklahomans who answered questions about their bar, club and smoking habits.

  • Cancer patients testing drugs on mouse 'avatars'

    Updated: Mon, Dec 15, 2014

    Scientists often test drugs in mice. Now some cancer patients are doing the same — with the hope of curing their own disease. They are paying a private lab to breed mice that carry bits of their own tumors so treatments can be tried first on the customized rodents. The idea is to see which drugs might work best on a specific person's specific cancer. The mice may help patients make what can be very hard choices under difficult circumstances. Studies can suggest a certain chemotherapy may help, but patients wonder whether it will work for them. Often there's more than one choice, and if the first one fails, a patient may be too sick to try another. So hundreds of people have made "mouse avatars" over the last few years to te

  • Cancer patients testing drugs on mouse 'avatars'

    Updated: Sun, Dec 14, 2014

    Scientists often test drugs in mice. Now some cancer patients are doing the same — with the hope of curing their own disease. They are paying a private lab to breed mice that carry bits of their own tumors so treatments can be tried first on the customized rodents. The idea is to see which drugs might work best on a specific person's specific cancer. The mice may help patients make what can be very hard choices under difficult circumstances. Studies can suggest a certain chemotherapy may help, but patients wonder whether it will work for them. Often there's more than one choice, and if the first one fails, a patient may be too sick to try another. So hundreds of people have made "mouse avatars" over the last few years to te

  • Eli Lilly's Cyramza gets new marketing approval

    Updated: Fri, Dec 12, 2014

    NEW YORK (AP) — Eli Lilly's drug Cyramza has been approved as a treatment for lung cancer, regulators said Friday. The Food and Drug Administration is allowing Lilly to market the drug as a treatment for cases that have spread. Earlier this year the FDA approved the drug as a treatment for gastric cancer. Cyramza fights the formation of blood vessels that feed tumors, and Eli Lilly is also studying the drug as a treatment for colorectal cancer. The company did not disclose third-quarter sales of Cyramza. Shares of Eli Lilly and Co. lost $1.53, or 2.1 percent, to $70.08 in afternoon trading as broad market indicators sagged. The Indianapolis company's stock has surged 40 percent in 2014 and it reached a 10-year h

  • New HPV vaccine strengthens cancer protection

    Updated: Wed, Dec 10, 2014

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The drugmaker Merck & Co. Inc. has received approval for an updated version of its Gardasil vaccine that protects against an additional five strains of the virus that causes most cases of cervical cancer. The Food and Drug Administration approved the company's Gardasil 9, which protects against nine strains of the virus called HPV, or human papillomavirus. That's up from four strains covered by the original Gardasil vaccine approved in 2006. The FDA said Wednesday the updated Gardasil has the potential to prevent roughly 90 percent of cervical, vulvar, vaginal and anal cancers. Original Gardasil protected against strains blamed for 70 percent of U.S. cervical cancers.

  • Merck advancing breast cancer drug to mid-stage

    Updated: Wed, Dec 10, 2014

    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Drugmaker Merck & Co. said Wednesday that it will advance a new cancer drug into bigger patient tests, after promising findings in an early study against a very aggressive, common type of breast cancer. Merck said its Keytruda shrank tumors to some extent in one-third of 27 patients evaluated in a study called KEYNOTE-012. All had what's called triple-negative breast cancer that had spread outside the breast, and about 85 percent had worsened after multiple rounds of chemotherapy and other treatments — some five or more treatments. The drug is in a hot new class of medicines, mostly still experimental, called immuno-oncology drugs.

  • South Africa's Tutu gets prostate cancer treatment

    Updated: Wed, Dec 10, 2014

    JOHANNESBURG (AP) — South African retired Archbishop Desmond Tutu has canceled travel plans for the rest of the year so he can undergo new treatment for prostate cancer, a foundation said. The Desmond and Leah Tutu Legacy Foundation said in a statement Tuesday that the Nobel Peace Prize laureate is starting a new course of medication to manage "the prostate cancer he's been living with for the past 15 years." Tutu's daughter and the foundation's director, Mpho Tutu, said her 83-year-old father had planned to attend a meeting of Nobel Peace Prize laureates in Rome this week.

  • Testing quandary for women with dense breasts

    Updated: Tue, Dec 9, 2014

    WASHINGTON (AP) — More women are learning their breasts are so dense that it's more difficult for mammograms to spot cancer. But new research suggests automatically giving them an extra test isn't necessarily the solution. Screening isn't the only concern. Women whose breast tissue is very dense have a greater risk of developing breast cancer than women whose breasts contain more fatty tissue. Laws in 19 states require women to be told if they have dense breasts after a mammogram, with Missouri's and Massachusetts' requirements taking effect in January. Similar legislation has been introduced in Congress. What's not clear is what a woman who's told her breasts are dense should do next, if anything. Some of the laws su

  • Chiefs' Eric Berry diagnosed with cancer

    Updated: Mon, Dec 8, 2014

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — Chiefs safety Eric Berry has been diagnosed with Hodgkin's disease and will begin chemotherapy for what doctors called a "very treatable and potentially curable" form of cancer. Berry had been undergoing tests at Emory University in Atlanta since an MRI exam nearly two weeks ago showed a mass on the right side of his chest. At the time, doctors were still uncertain whether the mass was cancerous, but further testing revealed the lymphoma. Dr. Christopher Flowers, who directs the lymphoma program at Emory's Winship Cancer Institute, said Monday that Berry will undergo "standard chemotherapy approaches" to treat the disease. Flowers did not provide a timetable or prognosis for recovery. "The goal

  • Next steps uncertain for women with dense breasts

    Updated: Mon, Dec 8, 2014

    WASHINGTON (AP) — More women are learning their breasts are so dense that it's more difficult for mammograms to spot cancer. But new research suggests automatically giving them an extra test isn't necessarily the solution. Screening isn't the only concern. Women whose breast tissue is very dense have a greater risk of developing breast cancer than women whose breasts contain more fatty tissue. Laws in 19 states require women to be told if they have dense breasts after a mammogram, with Missouri's and Massachusetts' requirements taking effect in January. Similar legislation has been introduced in Congress. What's not clear is what a woman who's told her breasts are dense should do next, if anything. Some of the laws su

  • Utah woman faces felony charges for faking cancer

    Updated: Fri, Dec 5, 2014

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Police say a 26-year-old Utah woman faked brain cancer and forged medical documents to raise money. County prosecutors charged Lesley Elizabeth Jensen of Nibley with nine felony counts of fraud and forgery Friday in Utah's First Judicial District Court. Logan City Police say Jensen claimed to have advanced stage brain cancer. Two days before charges were filed, authorities found Jensen inside her car in a remote area after family, concerned about her well-being, reported her missing. County Attorney James Swink says she was taken to a hospital and will be arrested once she's released. Swink isn't yet certain how much Jensen raised but expects it to be thousands or tens of thousands of

  • JPMorgan CEO Dimon says he is free of cancer

    Updated: Fri, Dec 5, 2014

    NEW YORK (AP) — JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon told the bank's staff Friday that he is clear of cancer. The executive, who steered the bank through the perils of the Great Recession, said in July that he was battling throat cancer. He continued to work throughout his treatment, though with a reduced schedule. A series of test conducted after the completion of his treatment showed "no evidence of cancer," Dimon said in an e-mail sent to staff. "The results are extremely positive and my prognosis remains excellent." The monitoring of his health would continue for several years, Dimon said. The e-mail was disclosed in a regulatory filing.

  • Toronto's new mayor takes the oath of office

    Updated: Tue, Dec 2, 2014

    TORONTO (AP) — Toronto's new mayor pledged better days are ahead and thanked an ailing Rob Ford for his public service as he took the oath of office on Tuesday. John Tory, a straight-laced, button down moderate conservative, formally replaced Ford as mayor of Canada's largest city. Ford's term was plagued by scandals involving public drinking and crack cocaine use. He announced in September that he wouldn't seek re-election as he battles a rare form of cancer. Despite the cancer, he opted to seek the suburban City Council seat where he launched his political career and where his everyman style and conservative fiscal policies first gained a faithful following that became known as Ford Nation. He won his old seat in a landslide.

  • Researchers present final report on taconite risks

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A final report to the Legislature on a six-year, $4.9 million University of Minnesota study says the state's taconite workers face higher risks from a rare form of lung cancer called mesothelioma the longer they've worked in the industry or if they've had above-average exposures to certain kinds of dust. The study assessed the risks to taconite workers from exposure to tiny, needle-like fibers called elongate mineral particles, or EMPs. Mesothelioma, a usually fatal cancer of the lung lining, is generally caused by exposure to airborne asbestos fibers. Lawmakers commissioned the study after a spike in the cancer was found on the Iron Range in 2006. Researchers planned to present the final report at a comm

  • Lawyer: Iowa murder suspect's child has cancer

    Updated: Thu, Nov 27, 2014

    IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — The attorney for a Missouri man charged with killing his wife in Iowa says his client needs time to care for his 5-year-old daughter while she fights cancer and is asking for a delay in his trial. Alex Fazzino, who is free on bond, is scheduled to go on trial in January for the 2012 death of his 32-year-old wife, Emily. He has pleaded not guilty to first-degree murder, contending her death was an accidental drowning in a bathtub at their home in Boone. Fazzino is now raising their three children in his hometown of Lee's Summit, Missouri, and was devastated after his youngest child was recently diagnosed with an acute form of leukemia, attorney William Kutmus said.

  • 10 things to be thankful for this Thanksgiving

    Richard Hall | Published: Thu, Nov 27, 2014

    Thanksgiving is a day for spending time with family and friends and, yes, enjoying some delicious food. But it’s also a time to be thankful for what we have in this life. The following 10 stories are happy and heartfelt, and represent the best that we as people have to offer — and be thankful […]

  • Mililani man gets $5.62M verdict for misdiagnosis

    Updated: Wed, Nov 26, 2014

    HONOLULU (AP) — A jury has awarded millions of dollars to an Oahu man who sued a hospital for not diagnosing a tumor in his mouth, his attorney said. Attorney Rick Fried said jurors reached the verdict Tuesday and awarded $5.62 million to his client, Jeff Kim. Kim, 43, of Mililani, went to an ear, nose and throat doctor at Straub Clinic & Hospital in 2008 with pain in his mouth and feared it was cancer, Fried said. "They failed to make a diagnosis of his symptoms before they let him go," Fried said. "The test that would have diagnosed the cancer was readily available at Straub but not done." Kim's tumor grew from the size of a lima bean to the size of a fist before the cancer was found in 2011.