• Former Indiana first lady Susan Bayh has brain tumor removed

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Former Indiana first lady Susan Bayh underwent brain surgery Monday for removal of a benign tumor, and her husband said her prognosis for recovery is good. The surgery at a Washington, D.C., hospital removed a plum-sized tumor from the 55-year-old Bayh, who had been suffering severe headaches for about two weeks, said Evan Bayh, a former Indiana governor and U.S. senator. "We feel like our prayers were answered," he told The Associated Press in a phone interview. "We're physically and emotionally wrung out, but happy that it wasn't worse." Bayh said his wife underwent 4-1/2 hours of surgery Monday morning and was heavily sedated in the intensive care unit several hours later. "We're happy to

  • Hundreds get buzz cut to support 5-year-old boy with cancer

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    MONTICELLO, Iowa (AP) — Hundreds of people volunteered this weekend to have their heads shaved in an effort to set a world record and show their support for a 5-year-old boy who lost his own hair during treatment for cancer. The boy, Austin Smith, is the son of Monticello Police Chief Britt Smith and was diagnosed around six months ago after doctors discovered a brain tumor, KCRG-TV (http://bit.ly/1SJymjr ) reported. Austin's grandfather, Kevin Smith, was the first person in line among the more than 400 people who had their heads shaved within one hour on Sunday. He said it was amazing to see the number of people who came to participate in the event, which included 10 hair cutters, plus young children and friends of the Smi

  • Camp Quality lets kids be kids again

    Yesterday

    Summertime is the best time of year to be a kid. With school out for three whole months, there is plenty of time for family, friends, fun and adventures. However, for the thousands of young people across the country who have been diagnosed with cancer, summertime can be filled with doctors’ appointments, tests and treatments that leave the children feeling completely drained of energy. Fortunately, there is one place where children with cancer can go that lets them be kids again, a place where they form everlasting friendships and have their spirits lifted and strengthened. That place is Camp Quality USA and last week, kids from all over Texas flocked to Huntsville’s Forest Glen Campgrounds to participate in this on

  • Nothing can stop kids from being kids during Camp Quality USA!

    Yesterday

    Summertime is the best time of year to be a kid. With school out for three whole months, there is plenty of time for family, friends, fun and adventures. However, for the thousands of young people across the country who have been diagnosed with cancer, summertime can be filled with doctors’ appointments, tests and treatments that leave the children feeling completely drained of energy. Fortunately, there is one place where children with cancer can go that lets them be kids again, a place where they form everlasting friendships and have their spirits lifted and strengthened. That place is Camp Quality USA and last week, kids from all over Texas flocked to Huntsville’s Forest Glen Campgrounds to participate in this on

  • Wichitan embraces life while controlling cancer

    Yesterday

    Wichita Falls, Texas - There is no hand wringing, no crying in the Thomas household. Jesse Thomas is too busy enjoying life to dwell on his cancer diagnosis. Too surrounded by the love of family, friends and a community of faith to meditate on a missing tomorrow. As a boy Jesse moved to Wichita Falls the week after the 1979 tornado. He loved riding motorcycles and discovered America on a Harley-Davidson. By 2009 Thomas was hard at work at Howmet, where he’d spent 31 years as a supervisor. He loved the job and everything was going smoothly. That was until his wife Cindy, a former hairdresser who styled Jesse noticed a freckle on his scalp had become large and dark.

  • Designer sale raises funds for ovarian cancer research

    Updated: Sat, Jul 25, 2015

    WATER MILL, N.Y. (AP) — Celebrities offered their star power and top designers offered their clothes to a sale benefiting ovarian cancer research. Dubbed by organizers as the Rolls-Royce of garage sales, Saturday's event — in a field in Water Mill, New York — featured items by more than 100 designers. Donna Karan, Ralph Lauren and Diane von Furstenberg, among others, donated clothes, shoes and accessories to benefit the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund. Karan helped start the event 18 years ago with her friend Liz Tilberis, the editor of Harper's Bazaar, who died of ovarian cancer. Last year, they took in $3.5 million. Kelly Ripa, who co-hosted, and Brooke Shields were among the celebrities at the Super Sa

  • FDA OK's Odomzo from Novartis for common skin cancer type

    Updated: Fri, Jul 24, 2015

    EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. (AP) — A new drug for advanced basal cell carcinoma, an increasingly common cancer in the skin's top layer, has won Food and Drug Administration approval. Odomzo (pronounced ah-DOMM'-zoh) was approved for patients whose cancer hasn't spread to other body parts, but recurred after surgery or radiation therapy or can't be cured by those treatments. The drug, known chemically as sonidegib (seh-NEH'-deh-gib), is a daily pill developed by Swiss drugmaker Novartis AG, which has U.S. pharmaceuticals headquarters in East Hanover, New Jersey. It can stop or reduce growth of cancerous lesions by suppressing a key molecular pathway.

  • One mile for Myles at a time: Greeley man bikes from Greeley to Pennsylvania to raise money for great nephew

    Updated: Fri, Jul 24, 2015

    Robert Minner knew the doctor had bad news. He expected it. He was prepared for it. He just wasn’t prepared for what the doctor said. Minner was in his early 60s and he was an active senior. He played competitive softball (not a beer league), ran marathons and was thin enough to see the outline of ribs through his shirt. He did all that because he enjoyed it but his family history motivated him as well. His father and uncles all died of heart problems in their 50s. Minner, who had 12 grandchildren, wanted a longer life. Minner, then, expected the doctor to tell him he had a heart condition. He almost expected his heart to trouble him at some point despite all the hard work. There’s only so much you can do about that famil

  • Hogan 'still feeling strong' after 2nd round of chemotherapy

    Updated: Fri, Jul 24, 2015

    BALTIMORE (AP) — Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan says he is "still feeling strong" after his second five-day round of chemotherapy. In a Facebook post Thursday night, Hogan said he's happy to be headed back to Annapolis. The governor says he's getting some work done from the hospital and posted a photo that shows him talking on a cellphone with papers spread in front of him on a table. Hogan is being treated at the University of Maryland Medical Center in Baltimore for B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. When he announced the diagnosis June 22, he said the disease was at an advanced stage but his prognosis was good.

  • As death nears, chemotherapy may do more harm than good

    Updated: Fri, Jul 24, 2015

    It’s been documented that many terminal cancer patients don’t benefit from chemotherapy and other types of treatments toward the end of their lives. Nonetheless, many, with their doctors, opt to continue treatment — faced with impossible choices, they hold on to hope that treatment might buy some time, or improve the quality of the days they have left. A new study, published Thursday in JAMA Oncology, may lead some to different decisions. Corresponding author Holly G. Prigerson of the Center for Research on End-of-Life Care at Weill Cornell Medical College and coauthors explored whether chemotherapy improved quality of life for terminal patients during the final week of life.

  • Camp Discovery hosts second annual dance for cancer patients

    Updated: Fri, Jul 24, 2015

    According to 19-year-old Alejandro Chalon, a two-year cancer survivor, being a child with the disease can be difficult. At age 13, Chalon was diagnosed with Retinoblastoma, a common eye cancer in children. “No one understood what I was going through in school. I felt lost,” Chalon said. Chalon said his experience at Camp Discovery — a summer pediatric oncology camp— was one that embodied hope. “The camp was amazing,” Chalon said. “We did archery, swimming and hiking. But the big deal was the dance. It was the highlight of my summers.” Chalon’s memories are a familiar story for more than 150 Camp Discovery campers this year. After Wednesday evening, some might have a different twist to

  • Federal judge revokes bond for woman who possibly faked cancer

    Updated: Thu, Jul 23, 2015

    A federal judge revoked the bond for a Midland woman who skipped town a day before her court hearing where prosecutors said they have evidence she faked cancer treatments to delay her court proceedings. Judy Kay Fryar, aka Judy Francis, was arrested Tuesday at her family’s lake house in Coke County, Deputy U.S. Marshal Steve Clark testified Wednesday during the hearing at the Midland Federal Courthouse. Fryar was reported missing July 8, a day before her court hearing. Fryar, who only spoke to answer questions from Midland Federal Judge Robert Junell, kept her head down as pretrial services officer Sylvia Villalba said Fryar violated her bond conditions by making an unapproved trip outside of Midland and Ector counties.

  • Surging new drug sales highlight strong Bristol-Myers Q2

    Updated: Thu, Jul 23, 2015

    Surging sales for new cancer, heart and hepatitis C medicines helped drugmaker Bristol-Myers Squibb Co. beat Wall Street expectations, and it boosted its 2015 profit forecast. Still, a sizeable acquisition charge triggered a steep tax bill and a $130 million net loss in the second quarter. The report comes amid a spate of recent positive science and regulatory news, particularly for the company's star biologic cancer drug, Opdivo. Among other news, it was approved Monday for advanced lung cancer in the European Union, where it got approval for advanced melanoma in June — both uses for it was approved in the U.S. over the past seven months.

  • Boise cancer patients get visit from bicyclist group

    Updated: Thu, Jul 23, 2015

    BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Cancer patients in Boise got a surprise visit from a group of bicyclists riding around the country to raise money for research. KIVI-TV reports (http://bit.ly/1SDAN79 ) that all 30 riders from the Ulman Cancer Fund visited patients receiving treatments at Saint Alphonsus Wednesday. The cyclists began in Baltimore and will ride 4,000 miles, ending in San Francisco. All 30 team members had to raise $4,500 to sign up for the ride. So far, the team has raised $185,000 with a goal of $200,000. ___ Information from: KIVI-TV, http://www.scrippsmedia.

  • Tanning salon owners sue Nebraska Cancer Coalition

    Updated: Wed, Jul 22, 2015

    OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A group of tanning salon owners is suing the Nebraska Cancer Coalition, accusing it of making false, defamatory statements about tanning that have hurt the businesses. The business owners operate 30 tanning salons in Omaha and Lincoln and said Wednesday they will file the lawsuit in Douglas County District Court. The lawsuit says the coalition's anti-tanning campaign called "The Bed is Dead" included inaccuracies and misleading elements, violating the Nebraska Deceptive Trade Practices Act. The Nebraska Cancer Coalition, according to its website, is a statewide partnership of 350 people representing 200 public and private organizations working to prevent and control cancer.

  • Camp in Grand Rapids gives fun to children coping with grief

    Updated: Wed, Jul 22, 2015

    GRAND RAPIDS, Mich. (AP) — Childhood summers are supposed to be carefree, but when a young person or their family member is diagnosed with cancer or is grieving, sometimes they need a little help recapturing what it means to be lighthearted. Camp Sparkle aims to give kids some of those traditional summer experiences, according to The Grand Rapids Press (http://bit.ly/1UUmpet ). The free day camp is funded through Gilda's Club of Grand Rapids. It runs every Tuesday for six weeks in July and August. Helping children heal is the camp's main purpose, but participants also learn about different cultures and have more than a little fun.

  • Duncanite battling cancer gets help from community

    Updated: Wed, Jul 22, 2015

    The Lassiter family was dealt a hard hand this January when their rock, Don, was diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer. Now the cancer has spread to his brain, kidneys and bones. “He’s always been there for his family,” said Melissa Lassiter, his wife. “He also worked so hard to be a provider for us.” This has started rounds of radiation and chemo for the last week. “It’s horrible,” she said. Melissa said he is an outgoing man and hard worker for his family. “Don is a very caring person, he loves people. He’d give them the shirt off his back if they needed it more than him,” she said. Friends of the Lassiters are trying to help with the financial burden the family is now facing. <

  • Iowa State DL Meyers finishing chemo for Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Updated: Tue, Jul 21, 2015

    DALLAS (AP) — Iowa State defensive lineman Mitchell Meyers is close to wrapping up chemotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma, a process during which he didn't miss any summer workouts with his teammates. Cyclones coach Paul Rhoads said Tuesday that Meyers has his last scheduled chemo appointment Friday in Iowa. Rhoads said Mitchell, who is from the Houston area, will then return to Texas for radiation treatment before rejoining the team in September. Iowa State announced in February that Meyers had been diagnosed with Hodgkin's lymphoma and was beginning treatment. Rhoads said prayers are still extended for Mitchell and his family, and that the team watches "in admiration and appreciation each and every single day.

  • Health care law helps sickest Americans, depending on their state

    Updated: Tue, Jul 21, 2015

    WASHINGTON — Every year, thousands of people like Blanca Guerra call the National Cancer Information Center, desperate to find some kind of health insurance. Guerra rang recently from her home in Arizona, seeking help for her older brother, who had just been diagnosed with advanced stage colorectal cancer. A few years ago, the call center would have had few solutions. But between 2012 and 2014, when the major coverage expansion made possible by the Affordable Care Act began, the share of callers connected with coverage has more than doubled from 12 percent to 27 percent, according to data provided to the Los Angeles Times.

  • When screening is bad for your health

    Updated: Tue, Jul 21, 2015

    If you haven’t gotten this message already, you should heed it now: The benefits of screening for breast cancer are limited. We should be doing fewer screening mammograms, not more. The data that support this conclusion come from studying the effects of mammography across time and place. A couple of years ago a colleague and I reported on the effect across time. We found that the initiation of widespread screening in the United States during the 1980s was associated with a substantial increase in the number of women found with early-stage breast cancer, but it didn’t yield much of a decrease in the number found with serious late-stage cancer.




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