• UConn baseball team adopts 5-year-old battling leukemia

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — The University of Connecticut baseball team welcomed its newest member: 5-year-old Grayson Hand of Sturbridge, Massachusetts. Hand, who's battling leukemia, joins the Huskies with the help of a Team IMPACT, an organization that matches children with life-threatening and chronic illness to college sports teams. The Hartford Courant (http://cour.at/1Hdb3NN ) reports seniors Carson Cross and Blake Davey were inspired to get involved with the Boston-based organization after hearing positive stories from the UConn men's hockey team, which also welcomed a young child to their team. Hand will have his own locker and can attend as many games and practices as he likes. ___ Information from:

  • Task force: Mammograms in 40s a choice, but don't skip at 50

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Women should get a mammogram every two years starting at age 50 — and while routine screening brings little benefit in the 40s, beginning it that early should be a personal choice, a government task force said Monday. Also, there's not enough evidence to tell if new 3-D mammograms are the best option for routine screening, or if women with dense breasts need extra testing to find hidden tumors, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force concluded. The draft advice issued Monday is largely a rewording of the task force's controversial 2009 recommendation that drew protests for questioning the usefulness of mammograms in the 40s.

  • Brothers share same rare cancer, battle it together

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    In July 2013, Mick Martin stopped by his brother’s desk at Avago Technologies in Fort Collins and asked him how the test went. Even then, even after Rick had coughed for months, Mick didn’t think it was possible that Rick could have the same thing Mick had. Doctors said so, even if, given their closeness, it would make a weird sort of sense. The two lived in Greeley, took camping trips together and somehow worked in the same building, even if it was for different companies. Rick, 54, worked for Avago, and Mick, 52, worked for a company that did maintenance for Avago. Mick’s name isn’t really even Mick, but it became his name, sort of like a guy who people start calling Junior, and so they were Rick and Mick, as if the

  • Expert panel sticks with controversial advice on mammograms

    Updated: 11 hr ago

    An expert panel convened by the federal government is standing by its controversial recommendation that most women should get mammograms to check for signs of breast cancer only once every two years, and that the tests need not begin until the age of 50. The draft report from the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force reiterates that mammograms do indeed save lives. But it also emphasizes the test’s downsides, many of which are unappreciated by doctors and the general public. Chief among the problems associated with screening mammography is the risk that it will result in unnecessary procedures and treatment by finding abnormal cells that would have been harmless if left alone, according to the panel, which first raised questi

  • A giving heart

    Updated: 13 hr ago

    Every time Nancy Davis walks into a room she has a smile on her face. She has an upbeat attitude to encourage people to get excited about helping others. That is what her life is about; giving back even when she is battling the toughest battle of her life: cancer. “It was very sudden,” the Cleburne resident said of how she found out she had cancer. It was the middle of the night on New Year’s Day and the cancer tumor, unbeknownst to her, had ruptured. She was in an immense amount of pain and thought her appendix had ruptured. She called her sister who took her to the hospital. The medical staff tried controlling her pain and her doctor made the call to take her straight into surgery because otherwise she wou

  • Mike Slive: Still SEC boss after cancer battle, feels good

    Updated: 14 hr ago

    BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Mike Slive made it clear he's still the boss of the Southeastern Conference, even with his successor seated next to him. The outgoing SEC commissioner said it will be "business as usual" the final three months of his tenure after undergoing radiation and chemotherapy treatment for prostate cancer, along with back surgery. Slive stressed he won't hand over the reins of the powerhouse league to his longtime No. 2 man, Greg Sankey, until Aug. 1. "The presidents and chancellors made it very clear that I am the commissioner," Slive said Monday, speaking at a Southeast Regional APSE meeting. "As a matter of fact, now that I am getting further and further away from chemo, I'm getting more and more feisty. I

  • Task force: Mammograms in 40s a choice, but don't skip at 50

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Women should get a mammogram every two years starting at age 50 — and while routine screening brings little benefit in the 40s, beginning it that early should be a personal choice, a government task force said Monday. Also, there's not enough evidence to tell if new 3-D mammograms are the best option for routine screening, or if women with dense breasts need extra testing to find hidden tumors, the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force concluded. The draft advice issued Monday is largely a rewording of the task force's controversial 2009 recommendation that drew protests for questioning the usefulness of mammograms in the 40s.

  • Breast Cancer Cases To Increase 50% By 2030. Don't Panic. 

    Published: Mon, Apr 20, 2015

    Researchers at the National Cancer Institute project say that the number of breast cancer cases will rise 50% to 441,000 cases a year, according to research presented at the annual meeting of the American Association for Cancer Research. Sound awful? Maybe less so than you think. The increase was driven by three factors, according to Philip S. Rosenberg, PhD, a senior investigator in the division of cancer epidemiology and genetics at the National Cancer Institute (NCI), the lead investigator on the study.

  • Bristol-Myers: 2 cancer drugs beat 1 against melanoma

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Giving patients with advanced melanoma two Bristol-Myers drugs that work differently held the deadly skin cancer at bay far longer than just one, though the combination's considerable increase in serious side effects raises concerns about how much patients can endure. A study of 142 patients not treated previously found combining Yervoy and Opdivo, which mobilize the body's immune system to target cancer cells, greatly boosted survival over giving Yervoy alone. The company said the combo also was better than Odivo alone, based on a prior study.

  • Aspirin may reduce risk of some forms of cancer

    Published: Mon, Apr 20, 2015

    Taking aspirin regularly over several years may help prevent gastrointestinal cancers, a new study suggests. There was a 20 percent lower risk of cancers of the gastrointestinal tract, especially in the colon and rectum, among people taking aspirin, said lead researcher Yin Cao, a postdoctoral research fellow at the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston.

  • Breast cancer cases in U.S. projected to rise as much as 50% by 2030

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    New breast cancer cases in the U.S. are forecast to rise by as much as 50 percent by 2030, government researchers reported Monday. But while the surge in cases will pose “a huge challenge” to medical providers over the coming decades, coauthor Philip S. Rosenberg, of the National Cancer Institute said, the data also revealed “one silver lining”: lower incidence of the subtype known as estrogen-receptor-negative breast cancers, including difficult-to-treat HER2-positive and triple-negative types. “Although breast cancer overall is going to increase, different subtypes of breast cancer are moving in different directions and on different trajectories,” Rosenberg said in a statement.

  • New Blood Test Shows Promise in Cancer Fight

    Published: Mon, Apr 20, 2015

    In the usual cancer biopsy, a surgeon cuts out a piece of the patient’s tumor, but researchers in labs across the country are now testing a potentially transformative innovation. They call it the liquid biopsy, and it is a blood test that has only recently become feasible with the latest exquisitely sensitive techniques. It is showing promise in finding tiny snippets of cancer DNA in a patient’s blood. The hope is that a simple blood draw — far less onerous for patients than a traditional biopsy or a CT scan — will enable oncologists to quickly figure out whether a treatment is working and, if it is, to continue monitoring the treatment in case the cancer develops resistance. Failing treatments could be abandoned quickly, sparing patients grueling side effects and allowing doctors to try alternatives.

  • Bristol-Myers: 2 cancer drugs beat 1 against melanoma

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A study shows giving advanced melanoma patients two new Bristol-Myers drugs together held the deadly skin cancer at bay far longer than just one. However, the combo sharply increased serious side effects, leading more patients to drop out. The study of 142 patients not treated previously found combining Yervoy and Opdivo reduced chances of death or cancer progressing by 60 percent over Yervoy alone. In the Yervoy-only group, death or worsening of cancer occurred after 4 1/2 months on average. That average hasn't been determined yet in the combo group, where some patients remained in treatment at 15 months. Tumors were eliminated in 22 percent of those getting both medicines but in none receiving on

  • Frumpy Middle-Aged Mom: Here’s a prescription for doctors

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    I don’t know about you, but I find going to the doctor more annoying each year. I don’t know if this is because I’m getting crabbier in general or that it’s actually becoming more irritating. And now my 16-year-old daughter, Curly Girl, is experiencing it, too. Last night, I took her to her regular pediatric clinic because she was having a female problem, the details of which are not interesting. Even though we had an appointment, the staff informed me she had to come back the following day because there weren’t any doctors available who could give her the proper type of examination. Are you kidding me? I just drove her across town and sat in your waiting room, only to be told, “Come back tomorrow”? Not OK.

  • IN brief

    Updated: Sun, Apr 19, 2015

    Breast cancer to be topic of presentation CARL JUNCTION, Mo. — The University of Missouri Extension will present “Dialogues About Breast Cancer” at 6:30 p.m. Monday at the Jerry B. Stark Performing Arts Center, 300 S. Broadway Ave. “Dialogues About Breast Cancer” will be staged by a group of performing arts students from the University of Missouri Theater Department. Author Heather Carver attempts to explore and address the issue of sensitivity to breast cancer patients in the theatrical experience, according to an extension release. The performance is geared toward physicians, nurses and nursing students, breast cancer patients and survivors, and any member of the general public who may be touched in so

  • C.J. to be host for theatrical experience dedicated to breast cancer awareness

    Updated: Sun, Apr 19, 2015

    CARL JUNCTION, Mo. — A unique theatrical experience is coming today to Carl Junction — a town that has become known nationally for its efforts to create breast cancer awareness under the direction of CJ CARES. Through interactive theater, the University of Missouri Theater Department and the MU School of Medicine are opening conversations about breast cancer in rural communities throughout the state with the production "The Breast Cancer Dialogues.” The critically acclaimed production has been touring Northwest Missouri communities for the past two years, and after a full year of negotiations, will travel the farthest it ever has, to be performed at the Jerry B. Stark Performing Arts Center.

  • Studies: Merck drug Keytruda effective against 3 cancers

    Updated: Sun, Apr 19, 2015

    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — One of the hot new cancer immunotherapy drugs, Merck & Co.'s Keytruda, strongly benefited patients with melanoma, lung cancer and mesothelioma, according to three studies presented Sunday at the American Association for Cancer Research conference in Philadelphia. One study, comparing Keytruda to Bristol-Myers Squibb Co.'s Yervoy, could give Merck a temporary advantage as the rivals battle for market supremacy and billions of dollars in annual sales from this new generation of drugs, which help the immune system destroy cancer cells. While research continues, the pace is quickening and big improvements in patient care regimens are likely fairly soon.

  • Cancer diagnosis prompts sisters to have preventive surgery

    Updated: Sun, Apr 19, 2015

    NEW BEDFORD, Mass. (AP) — Dulce Noonan's cancer diagnosis may have saved her sister's life. When Noonan was told she had Stage 3A breast cancer, the news, naturally, frightened her. But the experience was also eerily familiar: Every woman on her father's side of the family had been diagnosed with cancer. This family history prompted her doctors to recommend genetic testing for her two sisters. One sister's results showed no concerns. But for her other sister, Susane Nunes of Fairhaven, the tests showed she had, like Noonan, genetic mutations to the BRCA2 gene. That significantly increased her chances of having breast and ovarian cancer. For Nunes, the news resembled a "time bomb" ticking away in the background a

  • Ohio hospitals conduct statewide colon cancer screening

    Updated: Sun, Apr 19, 2015

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — An Ohio cancer center is leading a statewide colon cancer screening in a study aimed at preventing the disease. The Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center says the project involving 42 hospitals around the state hopes to screen all Ohioans diagnosed with colon cancer since January 2013 for Lynch syndrome. The inherited genetic mutation is known to significantly increase the risk and recurrence of colon cancer. Officials say the syndrome also predisposes people to develop other cancers. They say knowledge that a person has syndrome can encourage that person and family members to get screened. Another goal is to create a statewide database for future research about colon cancer in Ohio.

  • Researchers test treatment that can halt acute myeloid leukemia

    Updated: Sat, Apr 18, 2015

    Acute myeloid leukemia is a conundrum among cancers. Immature cells swamp the bone marrow, crowd out healthy cells, and all too often can have devastating consequences. But a medical investigator at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York working with a team of researchers has zeroed in on what he calls the malignancy’s Achilles’ heel — a vulnerable “on” switch driving the cancer. And through sheer happenstance, Dr. Christopher Vakoc, the physician-scientist leading the research, identified a potential therapy that flips the switch off. It’s still far too early to say whether the approach works.




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