• Executive Q&A: CEO excited about new energy company

    By Jay F. Marks, Business Writer | Updated: Sat, Jul 19, 2014

    Jerry Winchester, a Dickson native, returned to Oklahoma in 2012 to lead the Chesapeake subsidiary destined to stand on its own. It took longer than expected because of Chesapeake’s transition, with new leadership, to a more focused oil and natural gas producer.

  • Eagle & Beagle for July 20, 2014.

    Published: Sun, Jul 20, 2014

    Don Mecoy: Eagle & Beagle is a weekly look at Oklahoma’s high-performing (eagle) and low-performing (beagle) stocks.

  • US oil, gas lease sale staged under protest

    Updated: Sat, Jul 19, 2014

    RENO, Nev. (AP) — A U.S. Bureau of Land Management sale of oil and gas leases on public land in central Nevada has been conducted under protest. Earlier this year, Lander County commissioners, the Center for Biological Diversity, the Yomba Shoshone Tribe and the Gandolfo Ranch filed protests over Thursday's sale in Reno. The sale also drew more than 30 protesters outside the office where it was staged, and it prompted last month's filing of a lawsuit seeking to block it by a rural Nevada group called Reese River Basin Citizens Against Fracking. Opponents have expressed concern about the impact of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, on the nation's most arid state and potential ground and surface water contamination associate

  • Refinery owner loses water cleanup legal challenge

    Updated: Sat, Jul 19, 2014

    FAIRBANKS, Alaska (AP) — A North Pole refinery owner has lost its latest challenge in a long-running attempt to get a petroleum company to pay for groundwater contamination that contributed to the refinery's closure. Flint Hills Resources Alaska cannot pursue damages against the former owner of its North Pole refinery, Williams Alaska Petroleum, a Superior Court judge has ruled. In November 2013, Judge Michael P. McConahy determined that the statute of limitations had expired by the time Flint Hills had filed its lawsuit. He made the same ruling this month. The Fairbanks Daily News-Miner reports (http://bit.

  • Teen's death puts focus on caffeine powder dangers

    Updated: Sat, Jul 19, 2014

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A few weeks before their prom king's death, students at an Ohio high school had attended an assembly on narcotics that warned about the dangers of heroin and prescription painkillers. But it was one of the world's most widely accepted drugs that killed Logan Stiner — a powdered form of caffeine so potent that as little as a single teaspoon can be fatal. The teen's sudden death in May has focused attention on the unregulated powder and drawn a warning from federal health authorities urging consumers to avoid it. "I don't think any of us really knew that this stuff was out there," said Jay Arbaugh, superintendent of the Keystone Local Schools.

  • Pipeline company faced $270K in penalties

    Updated: Sat, Jul 19, 2014

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — The company responsible for a recent natural gas pipeline accident that spewed a hazardous substance outside a small town in eastern Kansas has faced more than $270,000 in fines for problems elsewhere along its pipelines since 2006, according to federal records. A section of a Panhandle Eastern's pipeline erupted June 19, spraying 1,300 gallons of natural gas condensate over about three miles near Olpe, Kansas, a town of about 550 residents south of Emporia. The Houston-based company said the accident occurred while crews were trying to clean the pipeline. The oily residue of natural gas condensate hit a handful of homes and heavily damaged area crops and trees.

  • Lightning a threat to ND saltwater disposal sites

    Updated: Sat, Jul 19, 2014

    WILLISTON, N.D. (AP) — Three massive fires since the beginning of June have highlighted the threat lightning poses in the North Dakota oil patch, and in each case it was tanks that store the toxic saltwater associated with drilling — not the oil wells or drilling rigs — that were to blame. The lightning-sparked fires destroyed the groups of silo-like storage tanks at the three locations, which are among more than 440 sites in North Dakota where so-called saltwater is stored before being pumped into permanent disposal sites miles underground. In each case, the fires burned for days, spewing noxious black smoke into the air and literally salting the earth.

  • Kentucky town opens filling station to the public

    Updated: Sat, Jul 19, 2014

    SOMERSET, Ky. (AP) — Somerset's city hall ventured into the retail gas business Saturday, opening a municipal-run filling station that supporters call a benefit for motorists and critics denounce as a taxpayer-supported swipe at the free market. The Somerset Fuel Center opened to the public selling regular unleaded gas for $3.36 a gallon, a bit lower than some nearby competitors. In the first three hours, about 75 customers fueled up at the no-frills stations, where there are no snacks, no repairs and only regular unleaded gas. The mayor says the station was created in response to years of grumbling by townspeople about stubbornly high gas prices in Somerset, a city of about 11,000 near Lake Cumberland, a popular fishing an

  • 5 things to know about caffeine powder

    Updated: Sat, Jul 19, 2014

    The sudden death of a healthy high school senior in Ohio has increased attention on unregulated caffeine powder and the ease of taking a toxic dose. Here's a look at five things to know about the substance: ___ CAFFEINE POWDER IS EASILY AVAILABLE Bulk caffeine powder can be easily bought online. Both Amazon and eBay sell the substance. Pouches can start at more than $7, with just over a pound costing about $15. Users add the powder to drinks for a pick-me-up before workouts or to control weight gain. ___ THIS ISN'T INSTANT COFFEE The U.S. Food and Drug Administration said the product is essentially 100 percent caffeine. A teaspoon is roughly equivalent to the amount in 25 cups of coffee.

  • Oil and gas, livestock prices for July 19

    Published: Sat, Jul 19, 2014

    OIL AND GAS PRICES Oklahoma crude oil prices as of 5 p.m. Friday: Oklahoma Sweet: Sunoco Inc. — $99.75 Oklahoma Sour: Sunoco Inc. — $87.75 Oklahoma oil and gas drilling activity posted July 1: COMPLETION Alfalfa: D & J Oil Co. Inc.; Frank No. 1-28 Well; C SE1/4 SE1/4 SE1/4 of 28-27N-09W; 143,000 cu-ft gas per day, 7 barrels oil per day; TD 6,173. Beckham: Apache Corp.; Deal No. 5-11-21 No. 1H Well; NE1/4 NW1/4 NE1/4 NE1/4 (BHL) of 05-11N-21W; 210 barrels oil per day, 4,386,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 17,497. Grady: Continental Resources Inc.; Birt No. 1-13H Well; SE1/4 SW1/4 SW1/4 SW1/4 (SL) of 13-07N-06W; 439 barrels oil per day, 507,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD

  • Finding oil with sound blasts, by the numbers

    Updated: Fri, Jul 18, 2014

    The Obama administration on Friday approved using sonic air cannons to map offshore oil and gas in the Atlantic Ocean by measuring sound reverberating through waters shared by whales and other marine life. Some numbers to help explain it: 60 decibels. This is how loud humans normally talk. 140 decibels. Even momentary exposure to sound at this level can cause permanent hearing damage in humans. 180 decibels. The maximum underwater noise from sonic cannons allowed within 500 meters, mitigating physical damage to marine mammals. 2,500 miles. How far away lower levels of noise pollution from the cannons have been recorded by hydrophones. 138,000.

  • Feds approve oil exploration off US Eastern Coast

    Updated: Fri, Jul 18, 2014

    ST. AUGUSTINE BEACH, Fla. (AP) — The Obama administration has sided with energy developers over environmentalists, approving the use of underwater blasts of sound to pinpoint oil and gas deposits in federal Atlantic Ocean waters. The regulatory decision is the first real step toward what could be an economic transformation in East Coast states, potentially creating a new energy infrastructure, thousands of jobs and billions of dollars in tax revenue. But it dismayed people who owe their livelihoods to fisheries and tourism, and activists said it stains President Barack Obama's environmental legacy.

  • Fracking bans unlikely in Oklahoma, observers say

    By Jay F. Marks, Business Writer | Updated: Fri, Jul 18, 2014

    Oklahoma cities can regulate activities within their borders, but observers say any ban on hydraulic fracturing in the state is unlikely.

  • Oil, gas seismic surveys get OK along Eastern seaboard

    By JASON DEAREN, Associated Press | Published: Fri, Jul 18, 2014

    The Obama administration is reopening the Eastern seaboard to offshore oil and gas exploration, approving seismic surveys using sonic cannons that can pinpoint energy deposits deep beneath the ocean floor.

  • Montana court sends wind farm clash to California

    Updated: Fri, Jul 18, 2014

    BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — A dispute over a Montana wind farm's potential to harm nearby nesting eagles and other birds should be heard in California, the Montana Supreme Court said Friday, in an opinion that deals a legal setback to the project's developers. The legal row over the Rim Rock wind farm near Cut Bank began last year, when San Diego Gas & Electric accused developer NaturEner of concealing the possibility that eagles and other birds could be harmed by the 126-turbine project. NaturEner, whose parent company is based in Spain, filed a competing lawsuit in Montana. Its attorneys alleged SDG&E was trying to get out of an unfavorable contract and using the eagle issue as an excuse.

  • Coal railroad's delay reflects hurdles for exports

    Updated: Fri, Jul 18, 2014

    BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. coal industry efforts to tap into the growing export market are struggling to gain traction, as bureaucratic hurdles and resistance from environmentalists slow proposed mines in the Northern Plains, ports on the West Coast and now a proposed coal railroad in Montana. The Surface Transportation Board said Friday it will take until next April to complete its draft analysis of the Tongue River Railroad. That's the second significant delay in work originally scheduled for completion last year. The $403 million proposed rail line is jointly owned by BNSF Railway, Arch Coal, Inc. and candy-industry billionaire Forrest Mars, Jr..

  • Finding oil with sound blasts, by the numbers

    Updated: Fri, Jul 18, 2014

    The Obama administration on Friday approved using sonic air cannons to map offshore oil and gas in the Atlantic Ocean by measuring sound reverberating through waters shared by whales and other marine life. Some numbers to help explain it: 60 decibels. This is how loud humans normally talk. 140 decibels. Even momentary exposure to sound at this level can cause permanent hearing damage in humans. 180 decibels. The maximum underwater noise from sonic cannons allowed within 500 meters, mitigating physical damage to marine mammals. 2,500 miles. How far away lower levels of noise pollution from the cannons have been recorded by hydrophones. 138,000.

  • Obama opens Eastern Seaboard to oil exploration

    Updated: Fri, Jul 18, 2014

    ST. AUGUSTINE BEACH, Fla. (AP) — The Obama administration is reopening the Eastern Seaboard to offshore oil and gas exploration, approving seismic surveys using sonic cannons that can pinpoint energy deposits deep beneath the ocean floor. Friday's announcement is the first real step toward what could be a transformation in coastal states, creating thousands of jobs to support a new energy infrastructure. But it dismayed environmentalists and people who owe their livelihoods to fisheries and tourism. The cannons create noise pollution in waters shared by whales, dolphins and turtles, sending sound waves many times louder than a jet engine reverberating through the deep every ten seconds for weeks at a time.

  • FDA: Powdered caffeine can be lethal

    Updated: Fri, Jul 18, 2014

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration is warning consumers to avoid pure powdered caffeine sold on the Internet after the death of an Ohio teen. Even a teaspoon of the powder could be lethal — it is equivalent to 25 cups of coffee. Eighteen-year-old Logan Stiner of LaGrange, Ohio, died May 27 after consuming it. The FDA said it is investigating caffeine powder and will "consider taking regulatory action." In the meantime, the agency said it is recommending consumers stay away from it. Teenagers and young adults may be particularly drawn to the powder, which is a stimulant. Caffeine powder is marketed as a dietary supplement and is unregulated, unlike caffeine added to soda.

  • Trash-to-electricity project to double capacity

    Updated: Fri, Jul 18, 2014

    ARLINGTON, Ore. (AP) — Waste Management is doubling capacity at its landfill gas power plant south of Arlington, generating more energy for homes and businesses 260 miles away in Seattle. The Columbia Ridge Landfill and Recycling Center handles approximately 2 million tons of garbage per year, approximately one-third of which is shipped in by rail from Seattle Public Utilities. Once transferred into the dump, organic waste starts to decompose, releasing methane gas as a natural byproduct. Gas is collected via a system of 85 wells at Columbia Ridge, and fed into a power plant on site where it is used as fuel to generate electricity. The plant recently added four new engines, which are expected to come online in August.