• Colorado utilities say they can meet final air standard

    Updated: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    DENVER (AP) — Colorado's largest utility says it is well positioned to meet a new federal requirement that the state cut carbon dioxide emissions by more than 28 percent by 2030. Xcel Energy tells The Denver Post (http://dpo.st/1M1zZZj ) that it is on track to reduce its carbon dioxide emissions by 28 percent. That the Colorado cut announced Monday by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Nationwide, the plan seeks a 32 percent reduction in carbon dioxide emissions by 2030 from measures taken in 2005. Each state has its own emissions-reduction goal and each will have flexibility in how the targets are reached. Colorado's goal was set using a measure set in 2012.

  • Obama climate change plan criticized by Wyoming leaders

    Updated: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — The latest version of the Obama administration's plan to fight climate change won't work as promised and instead will drive up electricity rates and cost jobs, Wyoming's governor and congressional delegation said Monday. Wyoming — the nation's top-producing coal state — would need to cut carbon dioxide emissions about 37 percent from 2012 levels by 2030, or from about 50 million to 31.6 million short tons per year under the plan by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Wyoming Gov. Matt Mead vowed to keep fighting regulations that are "fundamentally bad for Wyoming" and that he said exceed the federal government's regulatory authority.

  • Oklahoma Corporation Commission takes new earthquake actions

    Updated: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Oklahoma Corporation Commission is imposing new guidelines on oil and natural gas disposal well operations in response to a rise in earthquake activity in northern Oklahoma and southern Logan counties. The commission that regulates the oil and gas industry announced the new rules Monday. Under the guidelines, the amount of wastewater a disposal well can handle from oil and gas operations is being reduced. Under the plan, operators will have 60 days to cut disposal volumes by 38 percent below their 2014 volumes, or about 3.4 million barrels. That will bring total volume to a level below the 2012 totals by about 2.4 million barrels. The area saw its sharpest rise in earthquakes beginning in late 2012.

  • Walker objects to Obama administration's power plant rules

    Updated: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Scott Walker joined other Republican presidential candidates Monday in decrying new rules from the Obama administration designed to cut greenhouse gas emissions from power plants, saying they would have "devastating impacts" and cost ratepayers billions of dollars. Walker asked Republican Attorney General Brad Schimel to join other states in filing a federal lawsuit to block implementation of the rule that Obama unveiled Monday afternoon at the White House. Schimel vowed to do just that, calling the rule an "unlawful action." "Yet again, President Obama is taking unilateral action and overstepping the limits of his authority to pursue a political agenda," Walker said in a statement.

  • ND delegation slams new power plant greenhouse gas limits

    Updated: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — President Barack Obama's effort to cut greenhouse gases from U.S. power plants is drawing sharp criticism from North Dakota's congressional delegation. Sens. John Hoeven and Heidi Heitkamp and Rep. Kevin Cramer say the new Environmental Protection Agency rules will drive up the cost of electricity at the expense of ratepayers and hurt the state's economy. Hoeven says the EPA rule requires North Dakota to reduce carbon emissions by 45 percent by 2030. Obama's proposed version last year called only for a 30 percent cut in emissions. North Dakota has seven coal-fueled electric power plants. Heitkamp says the new rule is an "over-reaching policy" that won't work for North Dakota. Cramer c

  • Environmental agency's clean power plan praised in Vermont

    Updated: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    MONTPELIER, Vt. (AP) — Vermont can breathe easy — it won't be required by new federal rules to lower power plant emissions. And it can breathe more easily still — state officials say the rules will mean less pollution blowing into the state from coal-fired generators in the Midwest. Vermont, Alaska and Hawaii are the only states exempted from rules the Environmental Protection Agency issued Monday that require other states to cut power plant emissions by 32 percent by 2030, said Chris Recchia, commissioner of the Public Service Department. Recchia and Deb Markowitz, secretary of the Agency of Natural Resources, said the EPA's Clean Power Plan appears aimed at applying nationwide policies that Vermont has been pursuing f

  • Alaska not included in new federal emission-cutting rule

    Updated: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — State political leaders welcomed the announcement Monday that Alaska was not included in a new federal rule aimed at reducing greenhouse gas emissions from power plants. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said it didn't have the information needed to determine the best system of emission reduction in Alaska, which has isolated infrastructures like Hawaii, Puerto Rico and Guam. The federal agency said it would determine how best to address emission standards for existing fossil fuel-fired power plants in those states and territories at an unspecified later date. "Because we recognize that these areas face some of the most urgent climate change challenges and some of the highest electricity r

  • Officials calling Nevada solar future bright under EPA rules

    Updated: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Several Nevada government and business leaders said Monday they see a bright future for renewable energy projects in the state under federal rules tightening pollution controls for greenhouse gas emissions from existing power plants. Nevada doesn't rely much on coal for electricity, and officials at a sun-drenched event beneath solar power panels at Las Vegas City Hall said the new Environmental Protection Agency rules could boost the business of converting sun, wind and geothermal energy to electricity. "Nevada has been ahead of this curve for a long time," Jennifer Taylor, executive director of the nonpartisan Clean Energy Project, told reporters.

  • Missouri GOP senator slams new power plant emissions limits

    Updated: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt of Missouri is calling a new plan to dramatically cut U.S. power plant emissions a federal overreach. The Republican criticized the final plan unveiled by Democratic President Barack Obama on Monday, adding that it could mean lost jobs for Missouri. Blunt also says it could mean higher utility bills and could particularly hurt middle- and low-income families. Environmental groups argued the opposite. Missouri's Sierra Club chapter director John Hickey said the plan could protect low-income neighborhoods, older residents and others from pollution. Hickey says it could bring jobs to the state.

  • New Hampshire officials applaud amended EPA emissions plan

    Updated: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — Officials in New Hampshire are cheering President Barack Obama's more stringent rules aimed at trimming carbon dioxide emissions by almost one-third over the next 15 years. The proposed rules unveiled Monday are easier on New Hampshire than the original proposal released two years ago. The state must cut carbon dioxide emissions by 23 percent by 2030 — from 1,119 pounds per megawatt hour of energy produced to 858 pounds per megawatt hour. The new rules also ease the transition in the years in between, meaning less of a "cliff" at the beginning of the program. The goal for New Hampshire, which has already trimmed emissions, is on the low end of the scale nationally.

  • Power plant emissions rule draws criticism from both sides

    Updated: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — President Barack Obama's plan to curtail power-plant emissions generated tough talk Monday from candidates for governor in coal-producing Kentucky. Democrat Jack Conway vowed to derail the rule in court, and Republican Matt Bevin accused his rival of hypocrisy on the issue. Conway, the state's attorney general, said he joined in a lawsuit aimed at stopping the environmental rule when it was first proposed. Now that the plan is in its final form, he promised to continue the fight against this "job-killing rule." Kentucky's top political leaders from both parties denounced Obama's plan, but for Conway it was another chance to show his willingness to stand up to the Democratic president, who is deeply un

  • Oklahoma governor says she is opposed to emission cut plan

    Updated: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Some of Oklahoma's top political leaders criticized President Barack Obama's plan Monday to fight climate change by cutting carbon dioxide emissions at power plants, saying it would likely increase electricity costs for consumers and harm the economy. Obama's "Clean Power Plan" proposes that by 2030 carbon pollution from the nation's power plants will be cut by 32 percent from 2005 levels. Proponents say it will keep 870 million tons of carbon dioxide pollution out of the atmosphere, the equivalent of taking 166 million cars off the road or cutting every ounce of emissions due to electricity from 108 million American homes. But Oklahoma Gov.

  • Virginia reaction to final Clean Power Plan rules

    Updated: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Virginia will face less stringent federal requirements for cutting emissions from its power plants, according to finalized rules announced by President Barack Obama's administration Monday. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has set a 2030 target of 934 pounds of carbon dioxide emitted per megawatt hour of electricity generated in Virginia, up from a more strict 810 pounds per MWH first proposed last summer. Virginia also has a less demanding interim target from 2022 to 2030 than what was first proposed. According to the EPA, Virginia has a "moderate" goal of reducing carbon emissions compared with other states. Reaction to the final plan in Virginia was mixed.

  • Ohio EPA chief says courts should review new emissions rule

    Updated: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The head of Ohio's Environmental Protection Agency says President Barack Obama's plan to cut power plant emissions raises legal questions about federal authority and courts should have a chance to review it. The cuts announced Monday call for states to reduce carbon dioxide emissions by 32 percent by 2030. Ohio's EPA director, Craig Butler, says his agency is still reviewing the federal rules. In a written statement, Butler said he believed it was "irresponsible" to implement the new rules until the courts decide whether the U.S. EPA has the authority. He said forcing states to rush forward with implementing the plan deprives the courts of that chance and "will drive changes that are unrecoverabl

  • Arkansas AG, lawmakers denounce Obama power plant rules

    Updated: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Attorney General Leslie Rutledge and other top Republicans in Arkansas are criticizing and vowing to fight President Barack Obama's plan to dramatically cut emissions from U.S. power plants. Rutledge on Monday said she was prepared to take "any and all appropriate legal action" to prevent the implantation of the plan requiring states cut carbon dioxide emissions by 32 percent by 2030. Gov. Asa Hutchinson said he'll fight the plan but said he'll also work with industries and consumers to "determine a lowest cost option to compliance." Members of the state's all Republican congressional delegation also denounced the plan, saying it would lead to higher costs on the state.

  • Obama power plant rules spark 2016 fight over climate change

    Updated: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama's sweeping new power plant regulations are thrusting the divisive debate over climate change into the race for the White House, with candidates in both parties seeing an opportunity to capitalize. To Democrats, rallying around climate change is a way to energize liberal supporters and paint Republicans as out of touch with the majority of Americans. To the GOP, Obama's executive actions to curb greenhouse gas emissions are burdensome to business and block job creation, an argument aimed at tapping into Americans' worries about the economy. The president unveiled the plan at the White House on Monday, calling it the "single most important step" the U.S. has taken to combat global clim

  • Native corporation announces fuel businesses purchase

    Updated: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Officials with Bristol Bay Native Corp. are announcing the purchase of two fuel businesses in Dillingham. Officials say the acquisitions of Bristol Express Fuels Inc. and Bristol Commercial Properties LLC were completed Friday. According to the Native corporation, Bristol Alliance Fuels will operate a nearly 3 million-gallon tank farm, a Bristol Express retail gas station and convenience store, and a marine fueling facility. No purchase price was announced. BBNC is the regional Native corporation that represents more than 10,000 shareholders with ties to the Bristol Bay area of southwest Alaska.

  • Puzzling area between Edmond, Guthrie illustrates one of many challenges facing earthquake experts

    BY COREY JONES, Tulsa World | Published: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    A perplexing swath of land between Edmond and Guthrie illustrates one of many challenges scientists and industry experts face in better understanding connections between wastewater disposal and Oklahoma’s surge in seismicity. The area doesn’t have the high-volume, deep-injection wells the Oklahoma Corporation Commission is targeting as the most likely to induce earthquakes, according to spokesman Matt Skinner. Back-to-back weekends of “very strong seismic activity” in June helped prompt the commission to ask operators of three wells in the area to halt, as well as a fourth not to restart operations, Skinner said.

  • Massachusetts officials praise move by Obama on power plants

    Updated: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    BOSTON (AP) — President Barack Obama's decision to mandate steeper greenhouse gas cuts from power plants may be running into opposition in some states, but in Massachusetts fellow Democrats are hailing the move. Massachusetts Attorney General Maura Healey on Monday joined other state attorneys general and local governments pledging to defend the new rules in court. Sen. Edward Markey called the plan ambitious and achievable, saying it could help avoid the worse consequences of climate change. Rep. Niki Tsongas also said the mandate could protect future generations.

  • Obama power plant cuts sets stage for new debate in Nebraska

    Updated: Mon, Aug 3, 2015

    LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — President Barack Obama's newest push to cut greenhouse gases from U.S. power plants set the stage Monday for a debate over whether Nebraska should comply with the requirements. Gov. Pete Ricketts voiced concerns that the federal Clean Power Plan would prove burdensome and costly to residents, while a leading Nebraska environmental group hailed it as a "flexible, common-sense rule" to reduce carbon pollution. Ricketts said his administration would examine the impact of the Environmental Protection Agency rules before he commits to a state plan to comply.




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