• Montrose hydroelectric facility gets federal grant

    Updated: Wed, May 20, 2015

    MONTROSE, Colo. (AP) — A new hydroelectric facility in Montrose is getting nearly a million dollars as part of a federal project to invest in water conservation and reuse projects in the drought-stricken West. The $900,000 grant for the Uncompahgre Valley Water Users Association was announced Wednesday. The money is coming from the Interior Department's Bureau of Reclamation. Interior Secretary Sally Jewell announced funding Wednesday for more than 60 projects in a dozen states. The Montrose project totals about $9.2 million. The project will install a 4.8 megawatt hydroelectric facility on an existing irrigation canal drop structure located on the South Canal. The power will be provided to the city of Delta.

  • Oklahoma governor signs bills to on wind industry incentives

    Updated: Wed, May 20, 2015

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Gov. Mary Fallin has signed six bills into law, including two measures aimed at altering tax incentives and credits for the Oklahoma wind energy industry. One bill phases out the current property tax exemption for wind facilities. The other makes wind facilities ineligible for a job creation tax credit currently offered by the state. A zero emissions tax credit currently available to the wind industry will remain in place. Fallin said Wednesday that phasing out some wind energy tax credits will reduce the burden on the state while still ensuring Oklahoma's wind energy industry continues to grow and thrive. The governor says Oklahoma's wind industry is among the strongest in the nation but no longe

  • Pipeline company: Up to 105,000 gallons of oil might have spilled from California line

    Updated: Wed, May 20, 2015

    GOLETA, Calif. (AP) — Pipeline company: Up to 105,000 gallons of oil might have spilled from California line .

  • Gulf oil leak records cannot be kept secret, US judge says

    Updated: Wed, May 20, 2015

    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal magistrate judge Wednesday rejected a company's bid to preserve the confidentiality of numerous emails and reports about its failed efforts to halt a decade-old Gulf of Mexico oil leak. The documents could be evidence in a lawsuit that a coalition of environmental groups, led by the New York City-based Waterkeeper Alliance, filed against Taylor Energy Co. The New Orleans-based company owned an oil platform that toppled during Hurricane Ivan in 2004. An Associated Press investigation recently revealed evidence that the leak at the site of the toppled platform is worse than Taylor or government regulators had publicly reported. U.S.

  • Exxon Mobil says oil discovery off Guyana is 'significant'

    Updated: Wed, May 20, 2015

    GEORGETOWN, Guyana (AP) — Exxon Mobil Corp. confirmed Wednesday that it has made what it calls a "significant" oil discovery off Guyana in waters also claimed by Venezuela as part of a long-running border dispute between the South American countries. The company and Guyana's government had said May 7 that the exploration was showing promise but provided no details. Exxon Mobil now says it is still working to determine the commercial viability of the find at a site within the 6.6 million-acre area known as the Stabroek Block but has reasons to be optimistic. "I am encouraged by the results of the first well on the Stabroek Block," said Stephen M. Greenlee, president of ExxonMobil Exploration Co.

  • Scientists link dolphin deaths in Gulf to 2010 BP spill

    Updated: Wed, May 20, 2015

    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — In a new study, a team of scientists says there's a definite link between the massive BP oil spill in 2010 and a record number of dolphin deaths along the northern Gulf of Mexico. The scientists on Wednesday said large numbers of dead bottlenose dolphins found along shores since the spill suffered from lung and adrenal lesions caused by swimming in oil-contaminated seas. The research paper backs up previous findings linking dolphin deaths to the oil spill. The study involved federal scientists with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. BP has rejected the contention linking the deaths to the oil spill. Instead, it said, the dolphins were likely suffering from common respiratory illnes

  • Judge temporarily halts fracking approvals in North Carolina

    Updated: Wed, May 20, 2015

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A judge has halted the approval of fracking operations in North Carolina until a higher court weighs in on the legality of the appointment of several boards that manage state resources and the environment. Wake County Superior Court Judge Donald W. Stephens' decision earlier this month prevents the Mining and Energy Commission from approving drilling units for hydraulic fracturing until the state Supreme Court decides a separate case regarding how the state panels are formed. No drilling units had been approved before the judge issued his order. Stephens issued a preliminary injunction that stops the commission from accepting or processing applications for drilling units for hydraulic fracturing, or fra

  • US oil and gas drilling boom's economic impact, at a glance

    Updated: Wed, May 20, 2015

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. energy drilling boom that took off in 2008 fueled economic growth and boosted hiring, at least through the end of last year. Yet production was thrown into reverse by a plunge in oil prices — from about $110 a barrel last summer to $50 in January. Most economists had expected cheaper energy to be an overall boon to the U.S. economy. It hasn't been. Consumers have been reluctant to spend their savings from the pump. As a result, they haven't offset the blow the economy has absorbed from reduced investment in oil and gas drilling.

  • Frank's International confirms layoffs in Lafayette

    Updated: Wed, May 20, 2015

    LAFAYETTE, La. (AP) — Frank's International is laying off 150 of its employees in Lafayette, part of the company's global effort to trim its workforce by 400 to 600 workers. According to local media reports, the layoffs are coming at the company's Lafayette complex near U.S. Highway 90. Employees were informed Tuesday. Frank's announced March 31 it would pare its employee numbers, a business decision that came after worldwide demand for its oil field tubular services and rentals fell. The layoffs are a reaction to slackened demand after the price of oil started collapsing last summer. The layoffs also come in the wake of Frank's purchase of Timco Services Inc., a Lafayette-based competitor of Frank's. Fran

  • Why many experts missed this: Cheap oil can hurt US economy

    Updated: Wed, May 20, 2015

    WASHINGTON (AP) — If there was one thing most economists agreed on at the start of the year, it was this: Plunging oil prices would boost the U.S. economy. It hasn't worked out that way. The economy is thought to have shrunk in the January-March quarter and may barely grow for the first half of 2015 — thanks in part to sharp cuts in energy drilling. And despite their savings at the gas pump, consumers have slowed rather than increased their spending. At $2.71 a gallon, the average price of gas nationwide is nearly $1 lower than it was a year ago. In January, the average briefly reached $2.03, the lowest in five years.

  • What do you really get for a $7,000 Tesla home battery?

    Updated: Wed, May 20, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — Elon Musk, the star CEO of the electric car company Tesla Motors and the rocket company SpaceX, staged an elaborate event last month to unveil a new product. Not a sleek new luxury car. Not a rocket that can ferry people to Mars. A home appliance — a battery — that can be mounted on a garage wall and ignored. The reason for all the excitement is because of what batteries like these might someday do. They may make the electric power grid more robust and able to handle increasing amounts of wind and solar power. In conjunction with rooftop solar systems, batteries may help homeowners reduce their electric bills.

  • US oil and gas drilling boom's economic impact, at a glance

    Updated: Wed, May 20, 2015

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. energy drilling boom that took off in 2008 fueled economic growth and boosted hiring, at least through the end of last year. Yet production was thrown into reverse by a plunge in oil prices — from about $110 a barrel last summer to $50 in January. Most economists had expected cheaper energy to be an overall boon to the U.S. economy. It hasn't been. Consumers have been reluctant to spend their savings from the pump. As a result, they haven't offset the blow the economy has absorbed from reduced investment in oil and gas drilling.

  • Utility regulators keep wind power negotiations alive

    Updated: Wed, May 20, 2015

    AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — Utility regulators moved one step closer Wednesday to entering into a long-term contract with developers hoping to sell power generated by a wind project in Somerset County. The Maine Public Utilities Commission voted 2-1 to modify and approve the terms of an agreement with NextEra Energy Resources LLC to ensure that the state is getting the best deal. If the company agrees to the new conditions, a contract will be drafted and sent to the commission for final approval. The commission approved the terms for the Highland Wind project and another one in December, but voted two months later to reconsider those decisions in light of changes in the energy market.

  • New North Dakota oil tax law may threaten accord with tribes

    Updated: Wed, May 20, 2015

    BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — A North Dakota oil tax revenue sharing agreement with an American Indian reservation that covers nearly a third of the state's oil production may be threatened by a new state law that shaves the overall oil tax rate following the fall in crude prices. The Legislature last month passed the measure, which also abolishes some price-based incentives. Three Affiliated Tribes officials said they're not happy with the tax cut because more money is needed to pay for oversight, road repairs and other consequences of oil development. Tribal leaders have threatened to pull out of the oil tax revenue-sharing agreement — which has raised nearly $1.5 billion for the state and the tribes to date — because of the tax cu

  • NY state to rule soon on crude oil facility at Albany port

    Updated: Wed, May 20, 2015

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York state regulators are expected to decide soon on a permit for a facility at the Port of Albany that critics say would make the port a hub for heavy Canadian tar sands crude oil as well as the millions of gallons of North Dakota Bakken crude it's now handling. Global Partners, based in Waltham, Massachusetts, needs the air quality permit to install seven boilers that would warm rail tanker cars to facilitate offloading of dense crude to Hudson River barges destined for coastal refineries. The Department of Environmental Conservation accepted the permit application on Nov. 21, 2013.

  • Eversource seeks rate drop that could save $25 per month

    Updated: Wed, May 20, 2015

    BOSTON (AP) — Eversource has requested an electric rate decrease from Massachusetts regulators that if approved could cut household electric bills in a large portion of the state an average of 20 percent. The supply price rate — the cost of purchasing power from generators —filed by Eversource on Wednesday is for basic service customers. It would apply to customers in the eastern parts of the state and would save the average residential customer about $25 per month. If approved by the Department of Public Utilities, the new rates would take effect July 1. Electric rates soared to historic highs during the winter but Craig Hallstrom, president of Massachusetts Electric Operations at Eversource, says prices ar

  • Continental Resources CEO Harold Hamm says he didn’t seek ouster of OGS staff

    By Adam Wilmoth, Energy Editor | Published: Wed, May 20, 2015

    Continental Resources CEO Harold Hamm on Tuesday denied reports claiming he asked for Oklahoma Geological Survey staff to be removed because of the way they addressed the state’s ongoing earthquake swarm.

  • Stillwater, Oklahoma, officials refine proposed drilling regulations as they wait for Legislature

    By Paul Monies, Business Writer | Published: Tue, May 19, 2015

    Officials in Stillwater continue to work on an update to the city’s oil and gas drilling code as the Legislature finalizes action on a bill stopping cities from enacting drilling bans.

  • Oil and gas, livestock prices for May 20

    Published: Tue, May 19, 2015

    OIL AND GAS PRICES Oklahoma crude oil prices as of 5 p.m. Tuesday: Oklahoma Sweet: Sunoco Inc. — $54.50 Oklahoma Sour: Sunoco Inc. — $42.50 Oklahoma oil and gas drilling activity posted May 5: COMPLETION Alfalfa: SandRidge Exploration & Production LLC; Clark 2910 No. 2-15H Well; S1/2 S1/2 SE1/4 SW1/4 (SL) of 15-29N-10W; 146 barrels oil per day 962,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 9,136. SandRidge Exploration & Production LLC; Daisy 2411 No. 1-27H Well; SE1/4 NW1/4 NE1/4 NE1/4 (SL) of 27-24N-11W; 157 barrels oil per day 80,000 cu-ft gas per day; TD 10,202. SandRidge Exploration & Production LLC; Ranita 2610 No.

  • Texas Governor Prohibits Cities And Towns From Banning Fracking

    Published: Tue, May 19, 2015

    HOUSTO- Texas Governor Greg Abbott on Monday signed a bill into law that prohibits cities and towns from banning an oil drilling practice known as hydraulic fracking, giving the state sole authority over oil and gas regulation, Reuters reports. Lawmakers in Texas, a state that is home to the two of the most productive U.S. shale oil fields, have been under pressure to halt an anti-fracking movement since November, when voters in the town of Denton voted to ban the oil and gas extraction technique. "This law ensures that Texas avoids a patchwork quilt of regulations that differ from region to region, differ from county to county or city to city," Abbott, a Republican, said in a statement.




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