• Residents: Islamic State group kills 30 Iraqi men

    Yesterday

    BAGHDAD (AP) — Islamic State group militants lined up 30 men in western Iraq and shot them dead Wednesday, an official and residents said, the latest mass killing carried out by the group since its advance across the country. The slayings, on a main street in the al-Bakir district in the town of Hit, targeted Sunnis tribal fighters allied with the government and members of the security forces that the extremists captured when they overran the town, the official and the residents said. The militants first paraded the men through town, shouting through loudspeakers that the captured men were apostates who fought against them, residents said. The extremists then lined up the men and shot them dead with assault rifles, resident

  • Tulsa mayor says city ready for winter weather

    Yesterday

    TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Tulsa mayor Dewey Bartlett says the city is ready to deal with snow and ice and keep the city's arterial streets drivable as quickly as possible when winter weather strikes. Bartlett said Wednesday that the city is preparing for the upcoming winter season. The city is responsible for clearing snow and ice from certain segments of the Tulsa expressway system and all main arterial streets. Other expressway segments in Tulsa are the responsibility of the Oklahoma Department of Transportation. The goal of the program is to make expressways and arterial streets safe and passable as soon as possible after snowfall or ice begins. Resources available to the city include 63 truck-mounted sand-salt spreaders

  • Israeli leader lashes back at harsh US criticism

    Yesterday

    JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel's prime minister said Wednesday that recent verbal attacks against him from the United States were merely because he was "defending Israel" and vowed to carry on with his policies despite the vitriolic rhetoric. Benjamin Netanyahu's remarks to parliament followed a report in The Atlantic this week in which unidentified U.S. officials lambasted the Israeli premier for his settlement policies and for undermining American peace efforts. The officials derided Netanyahu as cowardly and recalcitrant, among other insults. The report reverberated throughout Israel, with some coming to the prime minister's defense while others pointing to them as an indication of just how bad relations between the two close a

  • Pope praises 'heroic' responders to Ebola

    Yesterday

    VATICAN CITY (AP) — Pope Francis has praised the "heroic" response by doctors, nurses and volunteers helping contain the Ebola epidemic and has urged renewed international efforts to defeat the virus. Francis also asked for prayers for the victims during his Wednesday general audience, noting that Ebola is striking parts of Africa where some of the world's most disadvantaged already live. He said that he was gravely concerned about this "implacable illness" and was praying for those infected as well as those "who are heroically doing everything possible to care for our sick brothers and sisters.

  • Broncos fan who disappeared during game found safe

    Updated: Tue, Oct 28, 2014

    DENVER (AP) — A Denver Broncos fan who disappeared during last week's game has been found safe, police said Tuesday. Denver Police Sgt. Steve Warneke said Paul Kitterman, 53, was found Tuesday night in Pueblo, about 100 miles south of Denver. Warneke did not have any information about Kitterman's disappearance, but he said no criminal charges are expected. "All we were trying to do was make sure he was unharmed, and he was," Warneke said. "So at that point, we're finished." Police referred all other questions to Kitterman's family. The man's stepson, Jarod Tonneson, did not immediately respond to a message left by The Associated Press on his cellphone Tuesday night.

  • New Mexico deputy charged with shooting colleague

    Updated: Tue, Oct 28, 2014

    LAS CRUCES, N.M. (AP) — A northern New Mexico sheriff's deputy was charged with an open count of murder Tuesday after he allegedly fired several rounds from his handgun as his colleague tried to flee an alcohol-fueled argument at a hotel, police said. Deputy Tai Chan, a warrant officer with Santa Fe County, was being held without bond at the Dona Ana County Detention Center. The shooting happened just after midnight at Hotel Encanto in the southern New Mexico city of Las Cruces, where the two Santa Fe County deputies had stopped to spend the night after transporting a prisoner to Safford, Arizona.

  • Feds: Engineer's sleepiness caused derailment

    Updated: Tue, Oct 28, 2014

    NEW YORK (AP) — A sleep-deprived engineer nodded off at the controls of a commuter train just before taking a 30 mph curve at 82 mph, causing a derailment last year that killed four people and injured more than 70, federal regulators said Tuesday. William Rockefeller's sleepiness was due to a combination of an undiagnosed disorder — sleep apnea — and a drastic shift in his work schedule, the National Transportation Safety Board said. It said the railroad lacked a policy to screen engineers for sleep disorders, which also contributed to the Dec. 1 crash. And it said a system that would have applied the brakes automatically would have prevented the crash.

  • Maine prepared to enforce 'voluntary' quarantine

    Updated: Tue, Oct 28, 2014

    FORT KENT, Maine (AP) — Health officials said Tuesday they're prepared to legally enforce the state's "voluntary" quarantine on health care workers who've treated Ebola patients. Department of Health and Human Services Commissioner Mary Mayhew declined during a news conference to comment specifically on the case of nurse Kaci Hickox, who was confined against her will at a New Jersey hospital before traveling home to Maine. But Mayhew said her department and the attorney general's office were prepared to take legal steps to enforce a quarantine if someone declines to cooperate. "We do not want to have to legally enforce in-home quarantine," she said.

  • California shooting suspects arraigned

    Updated: Tue, Oct 28, 2014

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Prosecutors filed murder charges Tuesday against two Utah residents in the slayings of two California sheriff's deputies during a shooting rampage that also left a motorist and third deputy wounded. Luis Enrique Monroy-Bracamonte, who was booked into jail under the pseudonym Marcelo Marquez, and his wife, 38-year-old Janelle Marquez Monroy, appeared separately in court for an arraignment, but did not enter pleas. They were both shackled and in a courtroom cell surrounded by sheriff's deputies during their appearances. Monroy-Bracamonte had a bandage on his left forearm and asked Sacramento Superior Court Judge Helena Gweon to slow down as she read the charges against him.

  • 'Hello Kitty' arrested on drunken driving charge

    Updated: Tue, Oct 28, 2014

    GORHAM, Maine (AP) — Police say a Maine woman who was pulled over while wearing a Hello Kitty costume was arrested on a drunken driving charge. Gorham police say officers stopped 37-year-old Carrie Gipson, of Westbrook, at about 2 a.m. Sunday because she was driving in the wrong lane. They say she refused to take a breath test and was arrested for operating under the influence. She was taken to the Cumberland County jail. Her police mugshot shows her wearing a red and white Hello Kitty costume, minus the doll's mammoth head. There was no immediate response to a phone message left by The Associated Press at a residence believed to be Gipson's.

  • Investment adviser sentenced to 30 years in prison

    Updated: Tue, Oct 28, 2014

    STATESBORO, Ga. (AP) — Nearly two years after a banker who vanished was wrongly declared dead, he was sentenced Tuesday to 30 years in prison as he faced angry investors who lost millions of dollars entrusted to the former preacher who turned his persuasive powers into a career as an investment adviser. Aubrey Lee Price, 48, fled southeast Georgia in summer 2012 after committing acts of fraud that consumed most of the $40 million he raised from 115 clients and left the small Montgomery Bank & Trust, where Price served as a bank director, depleted of its assets and reserves. The bank closed several weeks later.

  • Obama says US can't shy away from Ebola battle

    Updated: Tue, Oct 28, 2014

    WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama said Tuesday that the United States can't be seen as shying away from battle against Ebola and must support health care workers who are returning from the front lines in Africa. Obama did not directly criticize quarantine policies for returning health care workers implemented in New York and New Jersey, but he said monitoring of those who come back from the fight needs to prudent and "based in science." "We don't want to discourage our health care workers from going to the front lines and dealing with this in an effective way," he said. Obama said a robust response in Africa will stop the spread of the disease in the United States. He reminded Americans only two people have con

  • Judge: OH company can skip birth control coverage

    Updated: Tue, Oct 28, 2014

    WASHINGTON (AP) — A federal judge has ruled that a small Ohio company doesn't have to offer birth control coverage as part of its employees' health insurance plan. In a two-page order, U.S. District Judge Ellen Segal Huvelle said the federal government couldn't require Urbana-based Johnson Welded Products to include the coverage as part of President Barack Obama's health care overhaul. The order was issued late last week. It was expected after the Supreme Court ruled in June that some companies with religious objections can avoid the contraceptives requirement in the Affordable Care Act. The family-owned Ohio company had resisted offering contraceptive coverage, citing religious objections.

  • 103 South Dakota bison transferred to other states

    Updated: Tue, Oct 28, 2014

    WIND CAVE NATIONAL PARK, S.D. (AP) — Bison from Wind Cave National Park have been transferred to preserves in South Dakota and other states to help form new or boost existing herds. The National Park Service says a total of 103 bison are part of the relocation effort. The bison transferred out of state are going to Missouri, Iowa, Kansas and Illinois. The transfers are allowed under an agreement between the Park Service and The Nature Conservancy. Tom Farrell with the Park Service says Wind Cave's bison herd is known for its high levels of genetic purity and diversity. Farrell says all bison tested negative for brucellosis.

  • New book of Watergate tapes out next August

    Updated: Tue, Oct 28, 2014

    NEW YORK (AP) — More transcripts of White House tapes from the Richard Nixon administration will be published next August, focusing on 1973, the year the world learned the recordings existed. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt announced Tuesday that the new book will be called "The Nixon Tapes: 1973" and will be edited and annotated by Douglas Brinkley and Luke A. Nichter, who worked on last summer's best-seller, "The Nixon Tapes: 1971-1972." The new transcripts will capture a turning point for Nixon, who had been easily re-elected in 1972. Televised Watergate hearings in 1973 revealed widespread wrongdoing and the startling news that the president had been taping conversations.

  • Apple CEO Tim Cook says Apple Pay a success

    Updated: Tue, Oct 28, 2014

    LAGUNA BEACH, Calif. (AP) — Apple CEO Tim Cook said Apple's new mobile payment system had over 1 million activations in the first three days after it became available, and is now more widely used than any competing payment system. "We're already No. 1. We're more than the total of the other guys," Cook boasted Monday during a tech industry conference, "and we've only been at it a week." He said Visa and MasterCard officials have told Apple that the Apple Pay system is already seeing more use than similar "contactless" methods of paying for purchases. While Apple has partnered with major banks and large retail chains including Macy's Inc., Walgreen Co. and McDonald's Corp., critics have noted that it's not accepted by a numb

  • Top UN Ebola official: new cases poorly tracked

    Updated: Tue, Oct 28, 2014

    KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — Authorities are having trouble figuring out how many more people are getting Ebola in Liberia and Sierra Leone and where the hot spots are in those countries, harming efforts to get control of the raging, deadly outbreak, the U.N.'s top Ebola official in West Africa said Tuesday. "The challenge is good information, because information helps tell us where the disease is, how it's spreading and where we need to target our resources," Anthony Banbury told The Associated Press by phone from the Ghanaian capital of Accra, where the U.N. Mission for Ebola Emergency Response, or UNMEER, is based.