• Stillwater, Oklahoma re-evaluates options after legislation on drilling in residential areas

    By Adam Wilmoth
    Energy Editor |
    Published: Sun, Apr 26, 2015

    The Stillwater City Council is moving forward with an effort to restrict oil and natural gas drilling within city limits after earlier delaying a vote to allow bills first to move through the Legislature.

  • Oklahoma employers dangle carrots, swing sticks in workplace wellness programs

    By Paula Burkes
    Business Writer |
    Published: Sun, Apr 26, 2015

    While Midwest City-based Hudiburg Auto Group recently gave Fitbit bracelets to employees to encourage more active lifestyles, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission recently ruled employers can continue to use financial penalties — of up to 30 percent of the total contributions for employee-only coverage — to nudge staff to participate in fast-growing wellness programs.

  • Executive Q&A: Gaillardia Country Club general manager is one of youngest in industry

    By Paula Burkes
    Business Writer |
    Published: Sun, Apr 26, 2015

    Christopher R. Watkins has overseen $2 million in capital improvements at Gaillardia Country Club. The club has 700 members, 65 percent of whom are residents of the Gaillardia housing addition. During its spring-summer season, the club employs 120.

  • Scientists catch light bouncing off an exoplanet

    By Amina Khan
    Los Angeles Times |
    Published: Sun, Apr 26, 2015

    An international team of astronomers says they've managed to take the first direct visible-light spectrum from an exoplanet, giving them a new tool to probe the nature of the “hot Jupiter” known as 51 Pegasi b. The findings, published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, offer a promising way forward to study exoplanets that doesn't rely on waiting for a distant planet to transit, or pass in front of its host star. “This result is encouraging and constitutes a very valuable proof of concept,” the study authors wrote.

  • Oklahoma City cancer survivor turned bodybuilder finds solace in her health

    By Jaclyn Cosgrove, Staff Writer | Published: Sun, Apr 26, 2015

    Rhonda Spinks, a 36-year-old Oklahoma City resident, competed in her first bodybuilding competition about five years after her doctors told her that her cancer was gone.

  • Partnership with Tulsa Tech helps growing Oklahoma company become national player

    By Joe Payne
    Tulsa Tech |
    Updated: 13 hr ago

    In January 1997, Quinn and Swanson Bierman decided to form a new local business known as Air Hygiene International, Inc. The name chosen by the two brothers reflected their primary industry goal of air pollution reduction through emissions testing. Even though the company's headquarters were made up of a back bedroom and a garage in the beginning, Air Hygiene's mission was to utilize cutting-edge computer and instrument technology to perform at a level of excellence typically associated with larger stack testing companies. Located in the center of the nation's oil and gas reserves, the company began testing natural gas fired engines across Oklahoma, Kansas, Texas, Missouri, Colorado, and Wyoming.

  • U.S. Supreme Court to consider constitutionality of Oklahoma's death penalty

    By Graham Lee Brewer, Staff Writer | Published: Sun, Apr 26, 2015

    On Wednesday, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on the state’s execution protocol, specifically the use of one of the three drugs in Oklahoma’s lethal cocktail. The court’s decision could have a lasting impact on the use of the drug across the country.

  • Norman students create 'Oklahoma Rising' songbook

    By Jane Glenn Cannon
    Staff Writer |
    Updated: 16 hr ago

    Norman High School students in Cindy Scarberry’s class in the fall of 2013 drew pictures to illustrate a songbook that will be used to teach elementary students the words to Oklahoma’s centennial song, “Oklahoma Rising.”

  • Families, with help, thrive years after Hissom lawsuit

    BY MIKE AVERILL
    Tulsa World |
    Updated: 14 hr ago

    TULSA — The signs that something was not right at the Hissom Memorial Center came pretty quickly for MaryAnn Duncan. She had tried her best to keep from sending the two foster children she cared for to the institution — even adopting one of them — but personal hardships and their disabilities left her with no other option but to turn to the state for help. Hissom, a state-run institution built in 1963 for individuals with developmental disabilities in Sand Springs, was the only option for Duncan and hundreds of others in the Tulsa area. “Help was nonexistent,” she said. “The state said there would never be any community

  • Doctors testing new 'balloon option' for overweight patients

    By Mackenzie Carpenter
    Pittsburgh Post-Gazette |
    Updated: 14 hr ago

    PITTSBURGH — She's 35 pounds overweight and has tried everything, but when that patient goes to see George Eid, a bariatric surgeon in the Allegheny Health Network, he usually has to tell her she's not heavy enough for weight-loss surgery. Soon, though, there may be a new option for that overweight patient who doesn't need to lose 100 pounds, but maybe a third of that — to jump start a weight-loss program, perhaps, or prepare for a surgical procedure. Eid, along with doctors at 15 medical centers around the country, is testing a new pill that, once swallowed, is pumped full of nitrogen gas to inflate a balloon in the stomach.

  • Study rules out link between autism, MMR vaccine even in at-risk children

    By Melissa Healy
    Los Angeles Times |
    Updated: 14 hr ago

    At least a dozen major studies have found that early childhood vaccines do not cause autism. But one possibility remained: that immunizations could cause the disorder in a small group of children who were already primed to develop the disorder. Now, new research has ruled that possibility out too. A study of nearly 100,000 children found that toddlers known to have an elevated risk of autism were no more likely to be diagnosed with the disorder if they were vaccinated against measles, mumps and rubella than if they weren't.

  • Calif. man caught napping is jailed on burglary complaints

    By The Associated Press | Updated: 14 hr ago

    PETALUMA, Calif. — Police say a would-be burglar got sidetracked by snacks and a comfy place to snooze, heating up some Tater Tots and taking a nap on the sofa of the house he broke into. The San Francisco Chronicle reports that a homeowner in Petaluma went downstairs to find the man asleep on her sofa Thursday. The woman rushed to her bedroom, called police and then ran out the front door. She woke up the man, who fled out the back. Officers parked on the next street spotted him and tried to handcuff him. Police say they used a stun gun on him twice when he resisted, but that he wasn't injured.

  • Medical briefs for April 26, 2015

    FROM STAFF REPORTS | Updated: 14 hr ago

    Medical briefs for April 26, 2015

  • Of Character: Each season of life has and continues to be important to Ken Mendenhall

    By Bryan Painter
    Staff Writer |
    Updated: 14 hr ago

    “Regardless of one’s station in life there are needs that adulation or success don’t touch, therefore Christianity has relevance for everyone,” Ken Mendenhall said.

  • Oklahoma Capitol Boxscore

    By Rick M. Green
    Capitol Bureau |
    Updated: 16 hr ago

    Rick M. Green: Oklahoma Capitol Boxscore for Sunday, April 26, 2015.

  • Silicon Valley marks Moore's Law's 50th

    By Pete Carey
    San Jose Mercury News |
    Published: Sun, Apr 26, 2015

    SAN JOSE, Calif. — Computers were the size of refrigerators when an engineer named Gordon Moore laid the foundations of Silicon Valley with a vision that became known as “Moore's Law.” Moore, then the 36-year-old head of research at Fairchild Semiconductor, predicted in a trade magazine article published 50 years ago Sunday that computer chips would double in complexity every year, at little or no added cost, for the next 10 years. In 1975, based on industry developments, he updated the prediction to doubling every two years. And for the past five decades, chipmakers have proved him right — spawning scores of new companies and shaping Silicon Valley to

  • Stillwater, Oklahoma re-evaluates options after legislation on drilling in residential areas

    By Adam Wilmoth, Energy Editor | Published: Sun, Apr 26, 2015

    The Stillwater City Council is moving forward with an effort to restrict oil and natural gas drilling within city limits after earlier delaying a vote to allow bills first to move through the Legislature.

  • Futures File: Spread of bird flu in Midwest could affect numerous agricultural commodities

    Published: Sun, Apr 26, 2015

    Walt and Alex Breitinger: Also, corn and silver prices are dropping.

  • Oklahoma employers dangle carrots, swing sticks in workplace wellness programs

    By Paula Burkes, Business Writer | Published: Sun, Apr 26, 2015

    While Midwest City-based Hudiburg Auto Group recently gave Fitbit bracelets to employees to encourage more active lifestyles, the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission recently ruled employers can continue to use financial penalties — of up to 30 percent of the total contributions for employee-only coverage — to nudge staff to participate in fast-growing wellness programs.

  • Oklahoma education news briefs

    Published: Sun, Apr 26, 2015

    Oklahoma education news in brief for Sunday, April 26, 2015.




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