Top Stories


  • Pregnant Woman Dies After Horrifying Medical Mixup

    Published: Thu, Apr 17, 2014

    As far as medical mix-ups go, it's a horrifying one. In October 2011, a 32-year-old woman underwent an operation at Queen's Hospital outside of London; Maria De Jesus was suffering from appendicitis and needed to have her appendix removed. Instead, her right ovary was taken out, and De Jesus, who was 21 weeks pregnant with her fourth child at the time, ended up dying roughly three weeks later, according to Newser. The case is now in front of a medical tribunal, which is weighing the medical fates of the two doctors involved, then-trainee surgeon Dr. Yahya Al-Abed, and Dr. Babatunde Coker, who was supposed to be supervising him. During the Oct. 23 surgery, De Jesus began to bleed "quite heavily. ... In the midst of this, Mr. Al-Abed removed what he clearly believed to be the appendix. He thought he found it, removed it, and gave to a nurse what later turned out to be Patient A's ovary," the tribunal heard. Coker, who was eating lunch at the time, was never summoned, nor was he aware the surgery was taking place. The mistake wasn't uncovered until much later, Newser reports.

  • Study: Dangers for casual pot smokers

    Published: Wed, Apr 16, 2014

    Young, casual marijuana smokers experience potentially harmful changes to their brains, with the drug altering regions of the mind related to motivation and emotion, according to Reuters. A new study to be published on Wednesday in the Journal of Neuroscience differs from many other pot-related research projects that are focused on chronic, heavy users of cannabis. The collaborative effort between Northwestern University's medical school, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School showed a direct correlation between the number of times users smoked and abnormalities in the brain, Reuters reports.

  • Depression risks increase for young dads

    Published: Mon, Apr 14, 2014

    Becoming a dad can be emotionally tough for any guy, but especially for young, first-time fathers. A new study finds that the first five years of parenthood — key attachment and bonding years for a child — may be the riskiest for young dads when it comes to developing depression, according to USA TODAY. Symptoms of depression increased on average by 68% over the first five years of fatherhood for men who were around 25 years old when they became fathers and lived with their children, according to the study published online today in the journal Pediatrics.

  • Lab-grown vaginas and nostrils work, doctors report

    Published: Fri, Apr 11, 2014

    Scientists who grow body parts in labs have reached two new milestones, creating normally functioning vaginas for four young women and new nostrils for five skin-cancer patients, according to USA TODAY. While the techniques are not ready for widespread use, the two reports published Friday in Lancet show progress in a field that has already produced lab-grown bladders, urethras and windpipes. The vaginal surgeries were performed on teenage girls born with absent or underdeveloped vaginas because of a rare condition called Mayer-Rokitansky-Küster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome. The surgery might also work for women who need vaginal reconstruction because of cancer, trauma or other conditions, researchers say.

  • My Family Stopped Eating Sugar for a Year and This is What Happened

    Published: Fri, Apr 11, 2014

    According to several experts, sugar is the thing that is making so many Americans fat and sick. One in seven Americans has metabolic syndrome. One in three Americans is obese. The rate of diabetes is skyrocketing and cardiovascular disease is America's number one killer, according to Yahoo Shine. Eve O. Schaub took all of this newfound knowledge and formulated an idea. She wanted to see how hard it would be to have her family spend an entire year eating foods that contained no added sugar. She'd cut out anything with an added sweetener, be it table sugar, honey, molasses, maple syrup, agave or fruit juice. Schaub also excluded anything made with fake sugar or sugar alcohols. Unless the sweetness was attached to its original source (e.g., a piece of fruit), they didn't eat it.

  • Boy's bracelets raise over $8,000 to help cure kids like him of cancer

    Published: Thu, Apr 10, 2014

    At first, it was a crafty way for a 10-year-old boy with a rare melanoma to kill time on trips to the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., about two hours away from his home, according to The Today Show. Now, Graham Fowler's hobby of making colorful bracelets has raised more than $8,000 — money he’s donating to childhood cancer research “so they find a cure and no one goes through this,” he told TODAY.com. Graham was diagnosed with spitzoid melanoma, a rare skin cancer, in April 2013, after a small, red spot on his arm wouldn't stop bleeding when he picked at it. After numerous tests, doctors discovered it was a rare tumor, and that his cancer was already advanced.

  • KOCO: Cancer struggle unites Oklahoma families in viral photo

    Published: Thu, Apr 10, 2014

    If most pictures are worth a thousand words, one in particular is worth a million, says KOCO. Three Oklahoma girls, seemingly so peaceful in the image, are all battling cancer and though they never met before the photograph was taken ...

  • 5 Things A Trip To The Bathroom Can Tell You About Your Health

    Published: Wed, Apr 9, 2014

    Discussing bodily functions is a well-ingrained part of any physician's vernacular. As a nephrologist, or kidney specialist, I often find myself talking about urine, because well, one of the main jobs of the kidneys is to filter wastes and toxins from our bloodstream. And all those wastes and toxins need somewhere to go once they have been removed from our systems. The result? Urine.

  • Record Low Teen Birth Rate Not Low Enough, CDC Says

    Published: Wed, Apr 9, 2014

    The number of young teens having babies has plummeted by two-thirds since 1991, but still, 1,700 girls aged just 15 to 17 deliver babies every week in the U.S., according to NBC News. Why? Ignorance, mostly — they’re not talking to their parents, they're not being properly educated about birth control and when they do try to use it, they use the least effective methods, such as condoms alone, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said. There are giant state-by-state differences in the birth rates, as well as ethnic differences, showing that good education and good parenting can help keep young girls safe from pregnancy, CDC experts said. Failed abstinence-only programs in states such as Texas and Mississippi are helping keep those states at the very top of the teen birth rate list, other experts said.

  • Yale University Drops Threat to Kick Out Student for Being Too Skinny

    Published: Wed, Apr 9, 2014

    A 92-pound Yale University student has finally ended her face-off with school officials who spent months insisting that she either gain weight or be suspended. And Frances Chan, 20, who contends she never had an eating disorder to begin with but is simply genetically thin, could not be more relieved, according to Yahoo Shine. “It felt really bad to be this powerless,” the student told the New Haven Register Sunday. “I ate ice cream twice a day. I ate cookies. I used elevators instead of walking up stairs. But I don’t really gain any weight.”

  • TV Host Samantha Harris Diagnosed With Breast Cancer

    Published: Wed, Apr 9, 2014

    Former "Entertainment Tonight" correspondent Samantha Harris is battling breast cancer, according to Yahoo Celebrity. The 40-year-old television personality got choked up as she revealed the heartbreaking news on "Good Morning America" on Wednesday. Harris initially detected a lump during a self-examination last fall, but her mammogram results came back clean earlier in the year. However, she says something still didn't feel right, which lead her to consult a breast cancer specialist several months later. Following a needle biopsy and a lumpectomy, specialists diagnosed her with breast cancer.

  • West Africa Ebola outbreak among 'most challenging' ever: WHO

    Published: Tue, Apr 8, 2014

    West Africa's Ebola unprecedented outbreak is among the "most challenging" for health workers since the deadly disease emerged elsewhere in Africa four decades ago, the WHO said Tuesday. Keiji Fukuda, assistant director-general of the World Health Organization (WHO), said the agency was concerned about the spread of the virus from its epicentre in the forests of southern Guinea.

  • 'Staggering' experiment: New hope for victims of spinal cord injury

    Published: Tue, Apr 8, 2014

    Paralysis may not last forever anymore, says USA Today. In an experiment hailed as "staggering," a team of researchers at the University of Louisville and the University of California-Los Angeles restored some voluntary movement to four men who were told they would never move their legs again. The finding, published online today by the journal Brain, upends understanding of the spinal cord and is likely to transform the lives of more than 1.2 million Americans who lack control over their lower limbs.

  • KFOR: Oklahoma doctor has license revoked for not paying child support

    Published: Tue, Apr 8, 2014

    An Oklahoma doctor is in trouble for not paying child support, says KFOR. A judge ordered the Oklahoma State Board of Medical Licensure to revoke Doctor Scott Pace’s medical license over the weekend, and the Department of Human Services says he owes ...

  • Team Boehner to Drudge: We didn't 'expand' Obamacare, we repealed a piece | WashingtonExaminer.com

    Published: Mon, Apr 7, 2014

    Hours after the Drudge Report suggested on Sunday that "Republicans expand[ed] Obamacare" in the headline for the site's lead story, an "alert" from the office of House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, countered that they had actually "chip[ped] away another piece" of the law, says the Washington Examiner. The recent change "eliminated a cap on deductibles for small group policies offered inside the law's health care exchanges as well as outside," the Associated Press explained. "Successfully repealing this Obamacare provision is just one part of Republicans' larger effort to repeal the full law and replace it with better solutions focused on lowering health care costs for families and small businesses," Boehner aide Kevin Smith wrote in the blog post.

  • Republicans can't beat Obamacare without effective health care solutions of their own | WashingtonExaminer.com

    Published: Thu, Apr 3, 2014

    The only thing missing from President Obama's Rose Garden press conference Tuesday was a "Mission Accomplished" banner, says the Washington Examiner. He bragged that 7 million people have “signed up” through the health exchanges and claimed it was a “big step forward.” Americans are smart to be skeptical about these assertions. After all, this is the president who told us, "If you like your doctor, you can keep your doctor, period." He said, “If you like your health care plan, you will be able to keep your health care plan, period.” He claimed the average family's health insurance costs would go down by $2,500 per year. To add to these lies, he has ignored the economic damage done to individuals who have lost their jobs, seen their hours cut, and had their wages lowered as a result of his signature achievement in office.

  • Tennessee teacher out of a job after taking sick student to ER, paying the bill

    Published: Wed, Apr 2, 2014

    “No good deed goes unpunished.” Wait a minute, that doesn’t sound right. However, this was the reality for a Tennessee teacher named Jennifer Mitts, who says she was forced to resign from her post at Red Bank High School after she took an ill student to the emergency room and paid for the bill, according to The Daily Buzz. Mitts footed the bill because the 20-year-old student did not have health insurance, according to an online petition supporting the teacher.

  • White House: 7 million have signed up under ACA

    Published: Tue, Apr 1, 2014

    More than 7 million people have signed up for health care coverage through federal and state exchanges created under President Obama's signature health care law, according to USA TODAY. With the announcement that came hours after the March 31 deadline to sign up for coverage, the Obama administration has cleared the initial projection for enrollees set by the Congressional Budget Office --a goal that had seemed out of reach after a rocky launch to the online federal marketplace last fall. "We surpassed the 7 million mark with the over 200,000 people who enrolled yesterday in states run by the federal government alone," White House Press Secretary Jay Carney said. "When we get numbers in from the rest of the states and people who are trying to sign up by the deadline and are finishing now even more people will be covered."

  • Student banned from track team due to hair

    Published: Tue, Apr 1, 2014

    A Michigan high school student says he’s been forced to leave his track team simply because of his hair. Mike Barker, a 17-year-old junior at West Iron County High School, recently styled his hair into a bright pink Mohawk to support his mother, who is battling breast cancer, according to Yahoo Shine. When authorities allegedly told him to choose between his hair, which violated school policy, and the team, Barker says, “I picked family." Barker shares his story at length in a YouTube video shot by Michigan blogger Jason Asselin. In it, he explains that he explains that he decided last week to fulfill his promise to his mom to dye his Mohawk — which he’s allegedly had for weeks without consequence — to honor not only his mom’s cancer struggle, but also the struggles of two aunts, one of whom died two years ago, Yahoo Shine reports.

  • KOKH: New treatment for breast cancer patients

    Published: Tue, Apr 1, 2014

    Linda Skala didn't want to endure dozens of trips during weeks of radiation treatment to fight her breast cancer reports KOKH. That's why she decided on a new treatment called "Intraoperative Radiation Therapy" or IORT, which only involved one trip to the ...