• Some of the major bills approved by Oklahoma Legislature

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Oklahoma Legislature wrapped up the 2015 legislative session on Friday, one week before its constitutionally mandated deadline, by passing dozens of last-minute measures. Among them are several related to the $7.1 billion state budget. Other major bills have already been signed by Gov. Mary Fallin since the legislative session began in February. Following is a look at some of those new laws: ANTI-ABORTION MEASURES: Fallin signed two bills that were pushed by anti-abortion activists, including one that will ban a common second-trimester abortion procedure that critics describe as dismembering a fetus.

  • Senate tweaks veterans health law to boost specialized care

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Veterans would get specialized medical care from private doctors more easily under a bill the Senate approved Friday. The measure relaxes a rule that makes getting specialized care from local doctors difficult for some veterans, especially those in rural areas. Senators approved the bill by voice vote as they rushed to wrap up legislative work before a weeklong Memorial Day recess. The Senate bill would open up private care to veterans who live within 40 miles of a medical facility run by the Department of Veterans Affairs, so long as the VA site does not offer the care required. Senators said the measure was needed because some veterans were unable to get federally paid medical care from private doc

  • Dentist accused of running 'house of horrors' agrees to quit

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    ST. AUGUSTINE, Fla. (AP) — A Florida children's dentist accused of running a "house of horrors" that included performing surgical procedures without anesthetic agreed late Friday to stop practicing dentistry. Dr. Howard Schneider of Jacksonville faces multiple lawsuits and his office has been picketed in recent weeks by parents carrying signs as a growing number of ex-patients complain about his practices. In addition, Florida officials launched an investigation and attorneys said the state was working on an emergency order to shut him down. The Florida Department of Health said Schneider voluntarily relinquished his license to practice in the state.

  • Business Highlights

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    ___ Wal-Mart's push on animal welfare hailed as game changer NEW YORK (AP) — Wal-Mart's push to get its suppliers to give farm animals fewer antibiotics and more room to roam is expected to have a big impact on the food industry, experts say. Though the steps are voluntary, Wal-Mart, which sells more food than any other store, has a history of using its retail muscle to change the way products are made and sold across the retail industry. Wal-Mart told The Associated Press that it's asking meat producers, eggs suppliers and others to use antibiotics only for disease prevention or treatment, not to fatten their animals, a common industry practice.

  • After week in jail, Florida mom agrees to son's circumcision

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    DELRAY BEACH, Fla. (AP) — A Florida woman's yearslong battle with her child's father over the boy's circumcision ended Friday after she agreed to the procedure in exchange for her release from jail. In a remarkable turnaround after a week behind bars for contempt and an initial hearing in which she was ordered to remain jailed, court reconvened and a sobbing Heather Hironimus signed paperwork giving approval for the 4-year-old boy's surgery, recoiling in tears and clasping her shackled hands after it was done. The shift, though under duress, threatened the hero status given to Hironimus by a bubbling movement of anti-circumcision advocates who have followed the case's every turn.

  • Plague in Idaho ground squirrels prompts health warning

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Ground squirrels south of Boise have tested positive for plague, and humans and pets should avoid the area, Idaho health officials say. The bacterial disease can be spread by the bites of fleas or by direct contact with infected animals, the Idaho Department of Health and Welfare said in a statement Friday. "We would probably advise people not to go out in that area," said Tom Shanahan, spokesman for the agency. "If you go out there, you need to take precautions." Officials said that includes insect repellent and staying away from dead animals. Pets should be protected with flea-repellent products and not be allowed to roam free, which increases the chances of a pet rolling on a dead ground squirre

  • Court: Nebraska wrongly ended girl's home care benefits

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — The Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services was wrong to end Medicaid benefits that had helped a woman care for her profoundly disabled daughter at home for more than a decade, the Nebraska Supreme Court ruled Friday, in a case that could affect how the department determines the eligibility of other children with long-term care needs. The girl, listed only as Brayden O. in the ruling, was born with a rare genetic disorder that causes severe mental disability and skeletal and muscular abnormalities. She must have round-the-clock supervision and must have help to bath, dress, groom, go to the bathroom, eat and communicate. Brayden's mother, listed only as Merie B.

  • Timeline: Key steps among companies in animal welfare

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    Major animal-welfare moves announced by food and retail companies since 2012: — FEBRUARY 2012: McDonald's Corp. requires its U.S. pork suppliers to outline plans to phase out the use of sow gestation stalls that limit movement. — AUGUST 2014: Nestle says it wants to get rid of the confinement of sows in gestation crates and egg-laying chickens in cages. It also wants to eliminate the cutting of the horns, tails and genitals of farm animals without painkillers. It also pledges that it will work with its suppliers on the responsible use of antibiotics.

  • BC-Business News Digest

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    Business News at 5 p.m. Supervisors: 6 a.m.-6 p.m. Skip Wollenberg and Michael A. Lee 6 p.m.-8 p.m. Richard Jacobsen For help please call: 800-845-8450, ext. 1680. Photos, ext. 1900. For graphics and interactives, ext. 7636. Expanded AP content can be obtained from http://www.apexchange.com. For access to AP Exchange and other technical issues, contact customersupport@ap.org or call 877-836-9477. If you have questions about transmission of financial market listings, please call 800-3AP-STOX. A selection of top photos can be found at: http://bit.ly/APTopPhotos All times EDT.

  • Attorney general studying possible medical marijuana plan

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Attorney General Mike DeWine said Friday he's studying the plausibility of a tightly crafted medical marijuana proposal, as much broader initiatives head toward Ohio voters. With the state debating whether to legalize marijuana, it's logical to explore what the alternatives are, said DeWine, a Republican who opposes making recreational marijuana legal. As long as assurances against abuse are in place, "I know there's a lot of people who might be for medical marijuana," DeWine said. DeWine said it's worth studying what is happening in other states when it comes to medical marijuana, something he's ordered his office to explore.

  • Iowa reports new bird flu turkey case in Pocahontas County

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Iowa agriculture officials say an additional turkey farm in Pocahontas County has tested positive for bird flu. If confirmed, the case will be the third in that county. The case brings the Iowa total to 64 farms with bird flu. The Iowa Department of Agriculture estimates 21,000 turkeys on the farm. Iowa has just over 1 million turkeys already killed or to be euthanized as a result of the virus. Iowa will lose more than 25 million birds, mostly chickens, as a result of the disease which first surfaced just over a month ago. The spread of the disease seems to be slowing with fewer new cases reported daily. Minnesota reported no new cases Friday, the seventh day with no new cases reported.

  • Gov. Kasich rescinds union rights for Ohio care workers

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Republican Gov. John Kasich on Friday rescinded a pair of directives issued by his predecessor that allowed independent home health care and child care workers under contract with the state to unionize, arguing the key union benefit of health insurance coverage is now widely available elsewhere. An executive order signed by Kasich walks back a pair of orders signed by then-Gov. Ted Strickland, a Democrat — one in 2007 for home health care workers, another in 2008 for child care workers — allowing collective bargaining. Separate unions representing roughly 10,000 care workers combined pushed back against the move, saying representation afforded the workers some basic rights in the state regulatory p

  • Indy 500 broadcast to introduce real-time telemetry to fans

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — During the broadcast of Sunday's Indianapolis 500, fans watching on television will be able to see just how much physical strain is put on a driver's body during the race. ABC has outfitted James Jakes and Sage Karam with sensors near the base of their hearts that will report real-time telemetry, including heart rate, respiration and calorie burn rate, as their cars careen around the speedway at more than 220 mph. The system was developed by Dr. Terry Lyles, an expert in human performance, stress management and life coaching who works with top teams in IndyCar, NASCAR and sports cars. ESPN analyst Jerry Punch said the idea is to show how the stress on a driver changes as the race evolves, particula

  • Pray for Pastor Azim

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    In the nation of Kazakhstan, Pastor Azim Janbakiev and his Presbyterian church are under attack. The church is or was located in Almaty. Since the start of this year, government authorities have not allowed the church to meet in its usual building. Here is part of the story in Pastor Azim’s own words. “Since the beginning of the year, we were forbidden to hold services in our building until we bring all of the building documents into the order. When we decided to find out what's going on, we found out that there are some ‘neighbors’ who have written a complaint to our church. "These neighbors do not like the fact that there is an active Christian church in their area, contrary to the faith of their ancestors, their tr

  • Bird flu cuts Iowa April egg production 4 percent from 2014

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Iowa egg production for April fell 8 percent from the month before and 4 percent from a year ago as the bird flu claimed millions of egg-laying hens. The first case was found in Iowa chickens around April 20 so the decline reflected in the U.S. Department of Agriculture monthly report reflects only some infected farms. The June 22 report will show a more complete picture. The virus has spread to 63 farms killing more than 21 million egg-layers. The average number of layers on hand was 56.1 million in April, 5 percent lower than the year before. The loss drove egg prices to a record on Friday. Midwest large eggs reached $2.32 a dozen. Commodity market analyst Urner Barry says the previous record

  • Not even helmets help pro bull riders stave off concussions

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Kasey Hayes hopped on the bovine beast trapped in the narrow holding pen like he'd done hundreds of times. He adjusted a tight rope on his left hand, found his balance and signaled he was ready to dominate the bull for the next eight seconds — or, at least, hoped to. The red metal gate swung open. The bull's spine rolled, the animal charged forward and stood on its rear legs. The crowd cheered as the first ride on this March evening appeared promising. After 3.72 seconds, Hayes lost control, hit the ground and got his head stomped on by the 1,600-pounder named Shaft. His hockey-like helmet split in two. The arena fell silent. "Come on Kasey. Come on son.

  • [BC-MCT-NEWSFEATURES-BEST-BJT-ADVISORY]

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    (TNS) Tribune News Service Best of Newsfeatures Budget for Friday, May 22, 2015 EDITORS: Here's a look at the week's top newsfeatures and special reports from Tribune News Service. These stories remain suitable for weekend use. This advisory moves each Friday.

  • 2 ex-Wesleyan students face US charges over drug overdoses

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    NEW HAVEN, Conn. (AP) — Two former Wesleyan University students pleaded not guilty Friday to federal charges they distributed synthetic party drugs that resulted in on-campus overdoses and sent 11 people to hospitals. The defendants, Zachary Kramer, 21, of Bethesda, Maryland, and Eric Lonergan, 22, of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, appeared in federal court in New Haven. Each was released after the judge set bond at $250,000. The two men are among five Wesleyan students who have been expelled since their arrest on state charges in connection with the on-campus drug overdoses, which left two students near death, including one who had to be revived when his heart stopped beating.

  • Panel backs bill aimed at boosting Maine vaccination rates

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — A Maine legislative committee endorsed a bill Friday that seeks to bolster vaccination rates among schoolchildren but lawmakers balked at an effort to prohibit parents from using the philosophical exemption to send their unvaccinated kids to school. The Health and Human Services Committee voted 9-3 in support of Democratic Rep. Linda Sanborn's measure, which would require parents to consult with their doctor and get a form signed if, for personal reasons, they oppose vaccinating their children and want to use the exemption. But the committee unanimously rejected another bill to remove the exemption, which even its supporters have acknowledged is probably not politically viable. Republican Gov.

  • ‘Amy’ follows late singer’s descent

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    CANNES, France — The history of pop music is filled with far too many untimely demises. But for all the cultural lumping together of these tragedies, they’re hardly as similar as we tend to believe. In “Amy,” a new documentary about the late star Amy Winehouse, we learn just how unique and complicated a descent can be. That narrative helped the film earn a warm reception from critics and audiences at the Cannes Film Festival, where it premiered ahead of a June release in theaters. But the portrayal turns out to sit a lot less well with some of those closest to its subject.




Advertisement