• Delaware gets $690,000 grant for nutrition

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    DOVER, Del. (AP) — Public health officials say Delaware's Women, Infants and Children program has received a grant of more than $690,000 to implement an electronic benefits transfer system. The Division of Public Health said Monday that the U.S. Department of Agriculture made the one-time grant. It will allow the state to replace paper food checks or vouchers with a card for use at authorized stores. The new cards will be rolled out over a two-year period. Delaware's WIC program serves nearly 20,000 low-income pregnant and post-partum women and their young children.

  • Appeals court says St. Luke's can keep Saltzer

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    BOISE, Idaho (AP) — One of Idaho's largest health care providers can continue to operate Nampa-based Saltzer Medical Group while it challenges a prior ruling that it broke antitrust laws in its buyout of Saltzer, according to a recent federal appeals court decision. The 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals said Friday the appeal is a top priority, the Idaho Statesman reported (http://bit.ly/1nNRqCv). Acknowledging that federal appeals cases usually take years to complete, the judges said they will schedule the case for the first opening in January. Earlier this year, U.S. District Judge B. Lynn Winmill ruled that St.

  • Ohio won't investigate Cedar Point ride accident

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — Ohio's amusement ride inspectors won't be conducting an official investigation into an accident at Cedar Point that injured at least two people, but will have to give the OK for the swing ride to reopen. The state only investigates accidents when someone is admitted to a hospital or stays overnight. Two people were hurt Saturday night when a cable snapped on the Skyhawk ride that swings up to 125 feet in the air, said Cedar Point spokesman Bryan Edwards. One person was treated at the park and another was treated at a hospital, Edwards said. Details were not released about the severity of the injuries or whether those injured were on the ride or watching it.

  • Donor gives OHSU $100 million for cancer research

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Oregon Health & Science University says it's closer to matching Nike co-founder Phil Knight's challenge for cancer research with the help of a new $100 million donation. The gift from a donor who asked to remain anonymous puts the Portland school's campaign over the $400 million mark, officials said Monday. Last year, Knight offered $500 million to OHSU if it could raise an equal amount by Feb. 4, 2016. Including the new gift, OHSU has collected more than $218 million in private pledges and donations from more than 5,800 supporters. The Oregon Legislature has added $200 million more to help meet the goal. "It's an extraordinary boost in confidence that we're going to complete the match," sa

  • Ballwin woman sentenced in Medicare fraud

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    ST. LOUIS (AP) — A St. Louis County business owner has been sentenced to more than four years in federal prison and ordered to pay $200,000 in restitution for bank and Medicare fraud. Tina Kuehl of Ballwin was sentenced Monday in federal court in St. Louis. She previously pleaded guilty to felony bank and health care fraud as well as three counts of making false statements. Federal prosecutors say Kuehl oversaw an organized effort at her home health business, Better Way Home Care of Ellisville, to defraud the federal insurance program by inflating the number of patient therapy visits eligible for reimbursement and submitting false diagnostic codes. The bank fraud involved a foreclosed $305,000 property loan from a Mar

  • Dozens treated for illness at Keith Urban concert

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    MANSFIELD, Mass. (AP) — Authorities say several dozen people were treated for alcohol-related illnesses at a weekend Keith Urban concert in Massachusetts. Police and fire officials say ambulances from five surrounding communities responded to the Saturday night concert at the Xfinity Center in Mansfield, about 30 miles south of Boston. At least 46 people were treated and 22 were taken to local hospitals. Police say more than 50 people were taken into protective custody at the concert, and some could face charges. Officials say about 18,000 country music fans attended the concert at the outside venue.

  • Third West Nile virus case in Mississippi

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — The Mississippi State Department of Health is reporting the state's third human case of West Nile virus for 2014. The new reported case is in Rankin County. Earlier, health officials reported cases in Newton and Hinds counties. The state health department only reports laboratory-confirmed cases to the public. In 2013, Mississippi had 45 West Nile cases and five deaths. State Epidemiologist Dr. Thomas Dobbs says the second case is a reminder of the importance of preventing mosquito exposures, particularly ahead of the active summer months. In 2012, Mississippi had 247 West Nile cases and five deaths.

  • Mother: Doctor with Ebola sought to be missionary

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — An Indianapolis woman whose son contracted Ebola while working in Liberia says family members are praying for his recovery. Dr. Kent Brantley is the medical director for the Ebola care center of the aid group Samaritan's Purse in the Liberian capital of Monrovia. Samaritan's Purse Vice President Ken Isaacs says Brantly is in stable and very serious condition. His mother, Jan Brantly, says he had wanted to be a medical missionary from an early age. She says the Indianapolis Heritage Christian High School graduate began going on mission trips while young and has also worked in Uganda and Tanzania. An Indiana University School of Medicine spokeswoman says Brantly graduated from there in 2009.

  • Florida voters approve of medical marijuana

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Any way you look at it — age, gender or party registration — Florida voters overwhelmingly support the idea of legalizing medical marijuana, according to a Quinnipiac University poll released Monday. The poll found 88 percent support for medical use of marijuana compared to only 10 percent who opposed. And most Florida voters also approve of allowing adults to have small amounts of marijuana for recreational use, with 55 percent in favor compared to 41 percent who oppose, the poll found. Florida voters will decide in November whether to legalize medical marijuana. While the poll didn't specifically ask about the ballot question, it indicates the issue will meet the 60 percent support needed for

  • More hospitals to test newborns for heart defects

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — More New Mexico hospitals are about to start screening all newborns for a type of heart disease. State health officials say some hospitals already test for a group of heart defects that cause severe, life-threatening symptoms but that others will start doing so Friday. That's a result of legislation enacted earlier this year. Health Secretary Retta Ward says it's important because some of the defects may not be apparent early on but the infants need life-saving interventions quickly. Hospitals will use an instrument placed on the skin to measure the pulse rate and the blood's oxygen levels. If the baby screens positive for low oxygen levels, further testing can be done.

  • Celebrate the season with a triple-tomato salad

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    At the peak of ripeness, an in-season tomato is one of the things that makes life worth living. Happily, that season is upon us. And this recipe is my ode to that summer tomato. All kinds of tomatoes are at the best just now, big and small, beefsteak and cherry. At the base of this salad are sliced beefsteak tomatoes, which are topped with chopped small tomatoes and drizzled with a tomato-based vinaigrette. Given that this is an essence-of-tomato salad, it's crucial that all of the tomatoes in the line-up be as ripe as possible. The best place to find them is at a farm stand or farmers market. How do you know if a tomato is ripe, ripe, ripe? Smell the stem end; its perfume should fairly shout, "Tomato!" And once you get them

  • Doctor: Injection lines placed correctly in inmate

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    PHOENIX (AP) — Intravenous lines were placed correctly during the execution of an Arizona inmate whose death with lethal drugs took more than 90 minutes, a medical examiner said Monday. Incorrect placement of lines can inject drugs into soft tissue instead of the blood stream, but the drugs used to kill Joseph Wood went into the veins of his arms, said Gregory Hess of the Pima County Medical Examiner's Office. Hess also told The Associated Press that he found no unexplained injuries or anything else out of the ordinary when he examined the body of Wood, who gasped and snorted Wednesday more than 600 times before he was pronounced dead. An Ohio inmate gasped in similar fashion for nearly 30 minutes in January.

  • UGA Pharmacy students plan tobacco cessation class

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    ATHENS, Ga. (AP) — Pharmacy students at the University of Georgia College are planning sessions to help people quit smoking or chewing tobacco as the campus prepares to go tobacco free. University System of Georgia officials approved the system wide tobacco ban this spring. The ban starts Oct. 1. The students will hold their first six-week session for 20 UGA employees or Athens residents starting Aug. 26. University officials say the pharmacy students will lead the group program and hold individual coaching session to help participants quit using tobacco. They are planning a second session aimed at UGA students in the fall. ___ Online: http://www.rx.uga.edu/index.

  • NC mayor walks to DC to protest hospital closure

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A North Carolina mayor fighting for the hospital that closed in his rural North Carolina town finished his two-week protest march to the nation's capital, where he told a crowd that his community's problems are part of a larger health care struggle. "The story of Belhaven is bigger than the trials of a single small town," Mayor Adam O'Neal said at a news conference Monday in Washington, D.C. The 45-year-old registered Republican started his two-week march of more than 200 miles to protest the closing of Vidant Pungo Hospital in Belhaven on July 1. Greenville-based Vidant agreed in April to operate the hospital until July and provide $1 million if local officials would provide an additional $2 mill

  • 5 things to know about Ebola outbreak in W. Africa

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — There has been panic and fear about the deadly Ebola disease spreading ever since Nigerian health officials reported Friday that a Liberian man sick with the disease had traveled to Togo and then Nigeria before dying. Here are five things to know about Ebola and how it is spread: 1. THE WEST AFRICA EBOLA OUTBREAK IS NOW THE LARGEST IN HISTORY. The World Health Organization says more than 672 people have died from Ebola. A total of 1,201 cases had been reported as of last week in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. In addition, one Liberian man has died in Nigeria. 2. BUT SOME PEOPLE HAVE SURVIVED EBOLA.

  • Fist bumps less germy than handshakes, study says

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — When it comes to preventing the spread of germs, maybe the president is on to something with his fondness for fist bumps. The familiar knocking of knuckles spreads only one-twentieth the amount of bacteria that a handshake does, researchers report. That's better than a high-five, which still passes along less than half the amount as a handshake. So fist bumps — popularized by Barack Obama and others — seem to be the wisest greeting, especially during cold and flu season, said researcher David Whitworth of Aberystwyth University in Wales. The importance of hand hygiene is nothing new in medicine.

  • Trial in salmonella outbreak begins in Georgia

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    ALBANY, Ga. (AP) — Jury selection is underway in the trial for three people charged in a deadly salmonella outbreak traced to a southwest Georgia peanut plant five years ago. Jury selection began Monday in federal court in Albany in the trial of former Peanut Company of America owner Stewart Parnell; his brother and food broker, Michael Parnell; and the peanut plant's quality control manager, Mary Wilkerson. The Parnell brothers and Wilkerson were indicted last year on 76 criminal counts that accused them of shipping tainted peanuts to industrial food customers and covering up lab tests that showed some batches of nuts tested positive for salmonella. Stewart Parnell and Wilkerson also were charged with obstruction of justic

  • Judge refuses to dismiss suit over animal massage

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    PHOENIX (AP) — A judge is refusing to dismiss a lawsuit in which Arizona animal massage therapists are suing a state board that wants to regulate the therapists as practicing veterinarian medicine. The ruling by Judge David Udall of Maricopa County Superior Court says the potential for disputes about facts in the case make it inappropriate to grant state officials' motion for dismissal. Three massage practitioners filed the lawsuit in March, contending that the Arizona State Veterinary Medical Examining Board is unconstitutionally preventing them from doing their jobs. The board argued for dismissal on grounds that the board can regulate animal-care practices such as massage because the board has a legitimate interest

  • Medicare hospital fund to stay solvent until 2030, four years later than previous estimate

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Medicare hospital fund to stay solvent until 2030, four years later than previous estimate.

  • Liberia president orders new anti-Ebola measures

    Updated: 12 hr ago

    MONROVIA, Liberia (AP) — Liberia's president has closed all but three land border crossings, restricted public gatherings and quarantined communities heavily affected by the Ebola outbreak in the West African nation. President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf described the measures late Sunday after the first meeting of a new taskforce she created and is chairing to contain the disease, which has killed 129 people in the country and more than 670 across the region. A top Liberian doctor working at Liberia's largest hospital died on Saturday, and two American aid workers have fallen ill, underscoring the dangers facing those charged with bringing the outbreak under control. Last week a Liberian official flew to Nigeria via Lome,