• AP-NH--New Hampshire News Digest 1:30 pm, NH

    Yesterday

    Upcoming New Hampshire news from The Associated Press for Saturday, Aug. 29, 2015. Good afternoon. Here's a look at how AP's general news coverage is shaping up today in New Hampshire. Questions about today's coverage plans are welcome, and should be directed to Northern New England Correspondent Rik Stevens at 603-224-3327 or rstevens@ap.org. A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking news and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories, digests and digest advisories will keep you up to date. Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNows. TOP STORIES: DRUG ABUSE-TR

  • Health, election work elevated Jimmy Carter post-presidency

    Yesterday

    ATLANTA (AP) — To Azaratu Zakaria, Jimmy Carter's battle against the Guinea worm is represented by a scar. Zakaria was the last person to be declared disease-free in Ghana after more than 20 years of work spearheaded the former president's humanitarian organization, The Carter Center. Zakaria, who is in her 40s, said she and her family have prayed every day since Carter announced this month that cancer has spread to his brain and forced him to scale back his work. "There is no one in my household who does not have the Guinea worm scar and for this reason, every time we think of the work he came to do to free us all from the disease," Zakaria said through a translator. "He has done a lot of good work and for that, we shall

  • Achoo: High pollen count has Oklahomans sneezing, wheezing

    Yesterday

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Oklahomans are grabbing their handkerchiefs and wiping their noses as they sneeze and wheeze into another congested hay fever season. Sneezing, coughing, runny noses and itchy eyes are common in late summer and early autumn among the estimated 50 million people in the United States who suffer from hay fever, otherwise known as seasonal allergic rhinitis. But heavy rainfall this spring and generally mild summer temperatures have made much of Oklahoma fertile ground for weeds and other plants that produce allergens, forcing an early start to the allergy season and threatening to make people unusually stuffed-up. "It looks like it's going to be a bad season," said Dr.

  • Washoe County identifies person infected with West Nile

    Yesterday

    SPARKS, Nev. (AP) — A resident of Sparks has tested positive for West Nile virus after that person donated blood. Washoe County health officials said the finding was confirmed Friday by the Nevada State Lab. They say the infected individual was identified as a possible case through a blood screening process after giving to a local blood bank. However, the person has not shown any symptoms such as a fever. Washoe County officials say the case might never have come to light if the person had not donated blood. Since the beginning of this month, five mosquitoes have tested positive for West Nile. Health officials recommend wearing bug repellant and getting rid of standing water that can turn into a mosq

  • Oklahoma records 2nd West Nile Virus death of the year

    Yesterday

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — The Oklahoma State Department of Health is reporting the second West Nile Virus death of 2015 in the state. The department says the latest death was a Stephens County resident, following the death earlier this month of a Carter County resident. A total of 21 cases of West Nile Virus have been confirmed in Oklahoma thus far in 2015. There were 18 confirmed cases of the virus last year with no deaths. Both the greatest number of cases and deaths in Oklahoma due to the virus was in 2012 when there were 176 cases with 15 resulting in death. The virus is spread primarily through the bite of the Culex mosquito — which increases in numbers during mid to late summer when temperatures rise and the

  • State struggles to expand beds for drug treatment programs

    Yesterday

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — Roughly 40 people wait for treatment at Serenity Place in a given week, hoping for a spot in one of the program's eight beds for drug addiction treatment. New Hampshire has been struggling to stem the tide of heroin and opioid addiction after overdose deaths topped 300 in 2014. Increasing access to treatment beds is a top priority, but some facilities like Serenity Place are struggling to meet state licensing requirements needed to bill Medicaid and other insurance providers. Without a license, Serenity Place is absorbing the costs of the treatment it's providing, can't move forward with plans to expand and runs the risk of being shut down. At Gov.

  • Parx Racing Entries, Monday August 31st, 2015

    Yesterday

    1st-$25,000, Maiden Claiming $10,000-$10,000, 3-Year-Olds & Up , Six Furlongs 2nd-$30,000, Claiming $7,500-$7,500, 3-Year-Olds & Up , Six and One Half Furlongs 3rd-$38,000, Claiming $7,500-$7,500, 3-Year-Olds & Up Fillies and Mares, Seven Furlongs 4th-$84,000, Maiden Special Weight, 2-Year-Olds , Five and One Half Furlongs 5th-$45,000, Claiming $15,000-$15,000, 3-Year-Olds & Up , Seven Furlongs 6th-$86,000, Allowance, 3-Year-Olds & Up (NW1 X), Five Furlongs (T) 7th-$84,000, Maiden Special Weight, 3-Year-Olds & Up , One Mile and Seventy Yards 8th-$50,000, Claiming $15,000-$15,000, 3-Year-Olds & Up , Six Furlongs 9th-$86,000, Allowance, 3-Year-Olds & Up (NW1 X), One Mile and Seventy Yards (

  • Parx Racing Entries, Monday

    Yesterday

    1st_$25,000, mdn cl $10,000-$10,000, 3YO up, 6f. 2nd_$30,000, cl $7,500-$7,500, 3YO up, 6½f. 3rd_$38,000, cl $7,500-$7,500, 3YO up F&M, 7f. 4th_$84,000, mdn spl wt, 2YO, 5½f. 5th_$45,000, cl $15,000-$15,000, 3YO up, 7f. 6th_$86,000, alc, 3YO up (NW1 X), 5f. 7th_$84,000, mdn spl wt, 3YO up, 1mi 70yd. 8th_$50,000, cl $15,000-$15,000, 3YO up, 6f. 9th_$86,000, alc, 3YO up (NW1 X), 1mi 70yd. 10th_$50,000, cl $15,000-$15,000, 3YO up, 1mi 70yd. (c) 2015 Equibase Company LLC, all rights reserved.

  • Pet owners warned of spreading canine virus in Rhode Island

    Yesterday

    PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Rhode Island health officials are warning dog owners that canine parvovirus is spreading around the state. The Department of Environmental Management says there have been an unusually high number of cases reported to the state officials. Veterinarians say canine parvovirus, or "parvo," weakens dogs' immune systems and causes them to become more susceptible to infection. Symptoms of the virus include vomiting and diarrhea that can lead to possibly fatal dehydration in some cases. Officials say parvo doesn't affect humans or other pets but can be severe in dogs that are not immune or have not been vaccinated. Rhode Island State Veterinarian Scott Marshall says the best protection against pa

  • Speaker to present anti-porn messages

    Yesterday

    An anti-pornography crusader and defender of the Catholic faith will speak twice in the Pueblo area today about protecting one’s family from harmful material on the Internet. Matt Fradd, a native of Australia, will deliver a family/youth talk at 6 p.m. at the Shrine of St. Therese, 300 Goodnight Ave. The talk is appropriate for those in eighth grade and older. At 8 p.m., a men’s group talk for those 18 and older begins at St. Paul the Apostle Church, 1132 West Oro Grande Drive in Pueblo West. Both presentations will center on pornography, especially on the Internet, and its detrimental effect on individuals and families. Fradd also will inform listeners on how to protect themselves and loved ones from harmful materi

  • OPINION: In tribal America, too many problems are dropped on cops

    Yesterday

    At some point, Americans decided that the best answer to every social ill lay in the power of the criminal-justice system. Vexing social problems — homelessness, drug use, the inability to support one’s children, mental illness — are presently solved by sending in men and women who specialize in inspiring fear and ensuring compliance. Fear and compliance have their place, but it can’t be every place. So wrote Ta-Nehisi Coates, a national correspondent for The Atlantic magazine, in an essay at Atlantic.com last spring. I ran across the quote in a new book called “Blue: The LAPD and the Battle to Redeem American Policing,” by reporter Joe Domanick. Coates’ essay is valuable reading. So is Domanick’s book. They

  • Drug Abuse Treatment

    Yesterday

    FILE - In this Feb. 17, 2015 file photo, New Hampshire Gov. Maggie Hassan speaks in Concord, N.H. Facing ongoing drug addiction problems buoyed by a lack of access to treatment, Hassan has ordered a review of the state's licensing procedures for treatment facilities. While some treatment facilities want to expand, they're hitting roadblocks in the form of regulations and, sometimes, community pushback.

  • Ala hospitals promoting breastfeeding for newborns

    Yesterday

    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — More than two dozen Alabama hospitals are joining an effort to promote breastfeeding. The state Health Department says 27 of the Alabama hospitals that deliver babies have agreed to participate in the Alabama Breastfeeding Initiative. The project is aimed at promoting the idea that breastfeeding an infant provides important nutritional and emotional benefits for newborns. About 67 percent of Alabama mothers reported initiating breastfeeding last year. But Alabama still trails the national rate of 79 percent and a U.S. goal of about 82 percent. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends exclusive breastfeeding for at least the first six months of a baby's life.

  • Cedar Falls police have open prescription drug drop-off

    Yesterday

    CEDAR FALLS, Iowa (AP) — Those in Cedar Falls looking to get rid of unwanted prescription drugs no longer have to wait for scheduled collection events. The Cedar Falls Police Department says it is now taking back unused, unwanted and expired prescription drugs, 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Residents can drop their unwanted medication in a secure box in the police department lobby. The former post office mailbox has been painted white and blue and is covered in the department's insignia. The effort is intended to keep prescription drugs out of the hands of people who could misuse or abuse them, and out of the trash and groundwater. Police say no needles should be deposited in the drop box.

  • Legionnaires' kills 2 Illinois veterans' home residents

    Updated: Fri, Aug 28, 2015

    QUINCY, Ill. (AP) — Two residents of an Illinois veterans' home have died of Legionnaires' Disease, the Illinois Department of Public Health said Friday. The health department said the two residents at the home in Quincy, about 300 miles southwest of Chicago, had underlying medical conditions. Both were among 23 residents of the facility who had earlier been diagnosed with the disease. Health department officials said the names of the deceased were being withheld to allow families to notify other family and friends. On Thursday, state officials said there were eight confirmed cases among residents of the home. That number increased to 23 after tests were conducted Friday.

  • Planned Parenthood sues Alabama over end to Medicaid funds

    Updated: Fri, Aug 28, 2015

    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Planned Parenthood Southeast on Friday filed a federal lawsuit over Gov. Robert Bentley's effort to cut off Medicaid payments to the organization's Alabama clinics. The organization said Bentley's effort penalizes low-income women who seek contraceptive and preventative health care services at the clinics. The lawsuit was filed in federal court in Montgomery. It accuses Bentley of violating a federal law that they said requires Medicaid patients to have their choice of provider to receive family planning care. "We're in court today because each and every patient, and her ability to make her own deeply personal and private health care decisions, matters," said Staci Fox, president and CEO of Planned P

  • Sale of e-cigarettes to Texans under 18 will be a crime

    Updated: Fri, Aug 28, 2015

    AUSTIN — They come in flavors as sugary sweet as kids’ cereal and as tempting as pizza and popcorn. But starting Oct. 1, the nicotine-laced vapor of e-cigarettes will be legally off-limits for Texans younger than 18. The battery-powered devices deliver nicotine by heating liquid chemicals into a vapor that users inhale. Little is known about the long-term health effects of vaping, but many health officials are concerned that the chemicals could be damaging. Many so-called vape stores already refuse to sell to youngsters, but doctors and other health officials urged legislators to officially prohibit the practice. “The prudent thing to do is protect the most vulnerable members of our society,” said Dr. Jason Terk, pres

  • Judge rejects call to block Walker from expanding Medicaid

    Updated: Fri, Aug 28, 2015

    JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — A judge on Friday rejected a request by state lawmakers to temporarily block Gov. Bill Walker from expanding Medicaid in Alaska. Superior Court Judge Frank Pfiffner denied the request by the Alaska Legislative Council to bar Walker from implementing Medicaid expansion until the merits of the council's case challenging Walker's authority to expand Medicaid on his own are decided. That means that unless the Alaska Supreme Court is asked to intervene and determines otherwise, Walker can move ahead with his plans to expand Medicaid next week, Pfiffner said. The Legislative Council filed a petition Friday seeking a review by the Alaska Supreme Court, said Stacey Stone, an attorney representing the cou

  • Legionnaires' disease sends California inmate to hospital

    Updated: Fri, Aug 28, 2015

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — A San Quentin State Prison inmate has been hospitalized with Legionnaires' Disease and about 30 others have symptoms, prompting authorities to shut off water at the facility and bring in portable toilets, bottled water and large water tanks to serve thousands of inmates and employees, official said Friday. Two other inmates also were hospitalized with symptoms, and officials were awaiting tests on whether any of the inmates with symptoms also have the potentially deadly disease, said Dana Simas, a spokeswoman for the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. Symptoms typically include high fever, chills and a cough.

  • 'Candy Man' doctor guilty of issuing illegal prescriptions

    Updated: Fri, Aug 28, 2015

    SANTA ANA, Calif. (AP) — A California doctor known as the "Candy Man" was convicted Friday of illegally prescribing powerful painkillers, and authorities said 20 of his patients died. Dr. Julio Diaz was found guilty by a federal jury in Santa Ana of 79 charges related to prescribing drugs that included oxycodone and fentanyl. He wasn't charged with any patient deaths. The 67-year-old Diaz, who ran a clinic in Santa Barbara, wrote illegitimate prescriptions for extremely addictive drugs and could face a decades-long prison sentence, said Ann Luotto Wolf, an assistant U.S. attorney. "I'm just very pleased with obviously the verdict and the outcome," she said. "I certainly hope that it is sending a message.




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