• BC-BKH--NC AP All-State Ballot,4th Add

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    ALL-STATE TEAM NOMINATIONS WOMEN BROOKLYN ALLEN, Canton Pisgah, G, Jr., 5-9 — Averaged 22.5 points, 8.6 rebounds, 4.0 steals and 3.1 assists. Conference player of the year. All-district pick by the N.C. Basketball Coaches Association. JANELLE BAILEY, Charlotte Providence Day, F/C, So., 6-3 — Averaged 18 points and eight rebounds. Two-time NCISAA all-state pick. Led team to 27-3 record and 6th consecutive NCISAA 3-A title. Already has several BCS offers. KAILA BALLARD, Gates County, F, Jr., 5-10 — See player of the year nominations. HAYLEY BARBER, Northwest Guilford, PG, Jr., 5-7 — Averaged 10 points, four assists and four steals as the heart and soul of 4-A regional finalist. Area player of the year

  • Mariners pitching prospect Sanchez dies 42 days after injury

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — Seattle Mariners pitching prospect Victor Sanchez died Saturday night from head injuries he suffered in a boating accident last month, his Venezuelan team announced. The Caracas Lions issued a statement saying the 20-year-old player died after being in a coma 42 days. Sanchez was swimming on Feb. 14 when he was struck in the head by the propeller of a motorboat at a beach in the Venezuelan coastal town of Campano. The right-handed pitcher was 7-6 with a 4.19 ERA last season at Double-A Jackson. He signed with the Mariners in 2011.

  • Jolie delivers empowerment message at Kids' Choice Awards

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — The traditional green slime flowed at the Kids' Choice Awards, but it was Angelina Jolie's message of empowerment for youngsters that stuck. Jolie, who has sought to inspire women with public candor about her own health, said that "different is good" as she accepted the favorite villain award Saturday for her movie role as the title character in "Maleficent." When she was young, Jolie said, "I was told I was different. And I felt out of place: too loud, too full of fire, never good at sitting still, never good at fitting in." "When someone tells you that you are different, smile and hold your head up and be proud," she said, then added with a wink, "cause a little trouble. It's good for you.

  • Ballot issue invites look at marijuana use in Wichita

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    How often do people get arrested for marijuana? Who gets arrested? And are they accused of other crimes as well? Those are some of the things we wondered as Wichitans prepare to vote April 7 on a proposal that would lessen first-time penalties for adults caught with an ounce or less of marijuana. The future of the proposal is unclear, even if voters pass it. State officials have already said they will challenge it in court since it conflicts with state law. But we can learn some things from what is happening with marijuana in Wichita now, based on data from the Wichita Police Department, Wichita Municipal Court and Sedgwick County District Court.

  • Bird flu found in a top Minnesota turkey producing county

    Yesterday

    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — An outbreak of a deadly bird flu strain spread to one of the top poultry producing counties of the nation's top turkey producing state of Minnesota, government officials confirmed on Saturday, raising fears that the that the highly contagious disease could seriously damage the industry. The highly pathogenic H5N2 strain of avian influenza has infected a third turkey farm in the state, this time a commercial flock of 39,000 birds in Stearns county in central Minnesota. The county is No. 2 in turkey production in Minnesota and is also one of the state's top chicken and egg producers. State Veterinarian Bill Hartmann said one of the four barns at the Stearns County farm was infected and that many turkeys in

  • Reporter-News staff wins 13 statewide awards

    Yesterday

    WACO — The Abilene Reporter-News won 13 awards Saturday in the annual Texas Associated Press Managing Editors’ competition. Reporter Christopher Collins took home the top honors for his Above the Law series that explored official misconduct by law enforcement officers in the Big Country. The online version of the project garnered him not only the best “Online Report” in the ARN’s classification of the contest, but also won the “Star Online Report of the Year,” competing against all other newspapers throughout Texas. Collins spent about six months gathering information and conducting interviews for the series. He filed more than 200 Freedom of Information requests with agencies.

  • Attorneys: Sterilizations were part of plea deal talks

    Yesterday

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Nashville prosecutors have made sterilization of women part of plea negotiations at least four times in the past five years, and the district attorney has banned his staff from using the invasive surgery as a bargaining chip after the latest case. In the most recent case, first reported by The Tennessean, a woman with a 20-year history of mental illness had been charged with neglect after her 5-day-old baby mysteriously died. Her defense attorney says the prosecutor assigned to the case wouldn't go forward with a plea deal to keep the woman out of prison unless she had the surgery.

  • Crash victim's father calls for more focus on pilot welfare

    Yesterday

    SISTERON, France (AP) — The father of one of the victims of this week's plane crash in the French Alps called Saturday for airlines to take greater care over pilots' welfare. Prosecutors say they believe German co-pilot Andreas Lubitz deliberately slammed the Germanwings aircraft into a mountain, and that he hid an illness from his employers — including a sick note for the day of the crash. "I believe the airlines should be more transparent and our finest pilots looked after properly," said Philip Bramley, from Hull in northern England. "We put our lives and our children's lives in their hands." His 28-year-old son, Paul Bramley, was one of 150 people killed in Tuesday's disaster.

  • Oklahoma measles patient went through Will Rogers airport

    Yesterday

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — A person in Oklahoma with measles traveled through Will Rogers World Airport in Oklahoma City and may have exposed others to the virus, according to airport officials. The state Health Department said Friday the infected person lives in Stillwater and has the first confirmed case of measles in Oklahoma since 1997. The airport said in a news release that the person was a passenger on a United Airlines Flight from Houston's George Bush Intercontinental Airport that arrived at 9:30 p.m. on March 12th. The person then went to the United baggage claim area. "The airport advises travelers and visitors that were in the terminal building on Thursday, March 12 from 9:30 p.m. until 1:30 a.m.

  • Guinea deploys police as Sierra Leoneans flee Ebola lockdown

    Yesterday

    FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — Guinea has deployed security forces to the country's southwest in response to reports that Sierra Leoneans are crossing the border to flee an Ebola lockdown intended to stamp out the deadly disease, an official said Saturday. The deployment, led by the head of the national gendarmerie, was sent late Friday night to the town of Forecariah, said gendarmerie spokesman Mamadou Alpha Barry, adding that the area is "secure." Residents reported tension in the region resulting from a large influx of Sierra Leoneans in the days leading up to the lockdown, which went into effect on Friday and ends Sunday. "Why would they leave their country if they didn't have Ebola?" said Forecariah resident Mamad

  • 2016 budgets to rise for Medicaid, colleges and universities

    Yesterday

    JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi's budget writers said Saturday that Medicaid, universities and community colleges will get more money than previous estimates called for in the year beginning July 1, in a total budget of roughly $6.1 billion. House Appropriations Committee Chairman Herb Frierson, R-Poplarville, and Senate Appropriations Committee Chairman Buck Clarke, R-Hollandale, said their ability to plug holes in last-minute negotiations Saturday was limited because revenue estimates for the 2016 budget didn't rise much. On Wednesday, lawmakers added nearly $102 million to the revenue estimate for the current budget year, which ends June 30. But they only added $30 million to the 2016 budget projection.

  • Medicaid expansion enrollment soars; waiver hurdle remains

    Yesterday

    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Mary Amick went 15 years without health insurance while working a minimum-wage job at a small country store outside Coldwater. She sometimes visited a free clinic but mostly put off addressing her medical ailments, needing to buy food and pay utility bills instead. But not long after hurting her shoulder in a fall last year, she got a letter from the state saying she was eligible for insurance under Michigan's expanded Medicaid program. "I felt like I had won the lottery," the 57-year-old Quincy woman said. With her insurance card, she visited a doctor who decided to X-ray her clavicle. It turned up a lesion on her lung — she had cancer.

  • Colleges getting out of health insurance business

    Yesterday

    SEATTLE (AP) — The federal health care overhaul is leading some colleges and universities to get out of the health insurance business. Experts are divided on whether this change will be good or bad for students. Some call it an inevitable result of health care reform and a money-saver for students since insurance in the marketplace is usually cheaper than the college plans. Others worry that more students will go without health insurance since their premiums won't be folded into the lump sum they pay for school. The main driver of colleges getting out of the insurance business is a provision in the Affordable Care Act that prevents students from using premium tax subsidies to purchase insurance from their college or univers

  • In Tallahassee, there's a low-profile push for child welfare

    Yesterday

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — In a state legislative session preoccupied with gambling, guns, booze and tax cuts, the Children's Movement of Florida is pushing a cause that gets little attention: health care and early education for children from poor families. It may not draw high-powered lobbyists to the Capitol rotunda, but Vance Aloupis, director of the group, said it's about the future. "Way too often these issues that are truly foundational to the future of our state are going unnoticed," he said. "Every year we drag our feet, a child gets a year older.

  • Rockingham County gets top health rating; Coos is last

    Yesterday

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — A new report once again ranks Rockingham County as New Hampshire's healthiest, while Coos County remains at the bottom of the list. The sixth annual report released this week by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute rates counties nationwide in two categories — health outcomes and health factors. Health outcomes are measured by longevity and quality of life. Health factors include tobacco, alcohol and drug use; access to and quality of health care; air and water quality; and income, education and employment among others.

  • Lewis-McChord hotel worker gets 2 years for embezzlement

    Yesterday

    TACOMA, Wash. (AP) — A longtime employee at a military hotel on Joint Base Lewis-McChord has been sentenced to two years in prison and treatment for a gambling addiction after she stole at least $250,000 in government funds. Gail Moody had worked for 27 years at the Rainier Inn, which provides affordable housing for military personnel and their families. From 2010 to 2012 she stole more than $250,000 in cash receipts. The U.S. Attorney's Office said the amount might have been more: It was impossible to determine if any thefts occurred before 2010 because the computer system had been changed. Staff noticed discrepancies between the cash receipts and what had been deposited in the hotel's bank accounts when she took a leave i

  • Rabid dead bat found at San Diego Zoo Safari Park

    Yesterday

    ESCONDIDO, Calif. (AP) — A dead bat found at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park has tested positive for rabies. The county's Health and Human Services Agency said in a statement Friday that the bat — which was not one of the zoo's animals — was found on a public walkway between the Gorilla Forest and African Woods. The statement says trained zoo staff removed the bat Wednesday and delivered it to the county Thursday. The county says there are no reports of any contact with the bat from humans or animals, but says anyone who was there on Wednesday and touched the bat should come forward to be tested. Health officials say there is no danger to anyone who did not have direct contact with the bat.

  • Number of people, by county, enrolled in Medicaid expansion

    Yesterday

    Enrollment as of March 23, by county, in the state's Medicaid expansion program, which is called Healthy Michigan: ___ ALCONA, 665 ALGER, 481 ALLEGAN, 4,633 ALPENA, 2,057 ANTRIM, 1,418 ARENAC, 1,137 BARAGA, 553 BARRY, 2,581 BAY, 6,689 BENZIE, 936 BERRIEN, 9,877 BRANCH, 2,474 CALHOUN, 9,206 CASS, 2,825 CHARLEVOIX, 1,360 CHEBOYGAN, 2,063 CHIPPEWA, 2,119 CLARE, 2,569 CLINTON, 2,331 CRAWFORD, 1,064 DELTA, 2,320 DICKINSON, 1,394 EATON, 4,708 EMMET, 1,974 GENESEE, 35,644 GLADWIN, 1,754 GOGEBIC, 1,003 GRAND TRAVERSE, 4,275 GRATIOT, 2,359 HILLSDALE, 2,560 H

  • GOP-guided budget sets up battles between Congress and Obama

    Yesterday

    WASHINGTON (AP) — With Republicans muscling a balanced-budget plan through the Senate, Congress is positioned for months of battling President Barack Obama over the GOP's goals of slicing spending and dismantling his health care law. Working into Friday's pre-dawn hours, senators approved the blueprint by a near party-line 52-46 vote, endorsing a measure that closely follows one the House passed Wednesday. Both budgets embody a conservative vision of shrinking projected federal deficits by more than $5 trillion over the coming decade, mostly by cutting health care and other benefit programs and without raising taxes. The Senate was beginning a spring recess after approving the measure, leaving Congress' two GOP-run chambers

  • After a few stumbles, GOP lawmakers regain footing on budget

    Yesterday

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Republicans are looking like they've finally figured out how to govern. The GOP's first months in control of both chambers of Congress were marked by high-profile stumbles and a near-shutdown of the Homeland Security Department. But this week, the party celebrated important successes. Republicans in both the House and the Senate came together to pass boldly conservative and balanced budgets, and House leaders struck a bipartisan deal on Medicare that passed on a huge vote and is expected to clear the Senate once lawmakers return from a two-week spring break. "Don't look now but we're actually governing," said Rep. Renee Ellmers, R-N.C Emerging from the week of triumphs, lawmakers were cautiousl




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