• WHO will miss Ebola targets it set for Dec 1

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    LONDON (AP) — Two months ago, the World Health Organization launched an ambitious plan to stop the deadly Ebola outbreak in West Africa, aiming to isolate 70 percent of the sick and safely bury 70 percent of the victims in the three hardest-hit countries — Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone — by December 1. Only Guinea is on track to meet the December 1 goal, according to an update from WHO. In Liberia, only 23 percent of cases are isolated and 26 percent of the needed burial teams are in place. In Sierra Leone, about 40 percent of cases are isolated while 27 percent of burial teams are operational.

  • Juventus snatches 2-1 win over Torino in Serie A

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    MILAN (AP) — Andrea Pirlo scored deep into stoppage time as 10-man Juventus snatched a 2-1 win over Torino in a derby match on Sunday, while Roma kept pace with the league leader with a 4-2 win over Inter Milan. "I followed the move, (Arturo) Vidal did well to see me, and I shot out of desperation right at the end," Pirlo said. "It's wonderful to win a derby at the last second." Bruno Peres' wonder goal had looked set to end the Bianconeri's 24-match winning streak at Juventus Stadium in Turin, after he ran almost the entire length of the pitch before leveling with a delightful finish to cancel out Arturo Vidal's penalty. Juventus defender Stephan Lichtsteiner was sent off 12 minutes from time for two yellow cards.

  • Gov.-elect Ige committed to inclusive government

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    HONOLULU (AP) — When Gov.-elect David Ige was an ambitious, 28-year-old engineer looking to climb the corporate ladder, the last thing on his mind was running for public office. But Ige's unlikely political career began when former Gov. George Ariyoshi was looking for bright, young professionals to appoint to open seats in the Legislature, and members of Ige's Pearl City community suggested him. Ige took a chance — taking four months of unpaid leave from GTE Hawaiian Tel, where he'd been promoted three times in four years — never imagining he would eventually find himself in the state's highest office. "I wasn't even a member of the party until I was on my way to meet with the governor," Ige said. "I was virtually

  • Rhode Island marks World AIDS Day

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Rhode Island residents will be marking World AIDS Day with events around the state. Gov. Lincoln Chafee will be joined at the Statehouse on Monday by health care workers and advocates who work on issues related to HIV and AIDS. The Rhode Island HIV Prevention Coalition says 74 people were newly diagnosed with HIV in Rhode Island last year. Kristen Pfeiffer of the HIV Prevention Coalition says rates of other sexually transmitted diseases such as gonorrhea and syphilis are on the rise, and that can increase the likelihood of HIV infection. Other events happening Monday include a display of four panels from the National AIDS Quilts at the Rhode Island School of Design.

  • Correction: Ebola-Omaha Patient-Memorial story

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    LANDOVER HILLS, Md. (AP) — In a story Nov. 29 about the funeral of a doctor who died of Ebola, The Associated Press reported erroneously the age of Dr. Martin Salia's younger son, Hinwaii. He is 12 years old, not 14. A corrected version of the story is below: Doctor who died of Ebola hailed as hero Doctor who died of Ebola remembered at funeral as national hero in Sierra Leone By BEN NUCKOLS Associated Press LANDOVER HILLS, Md. (AP) — Dr. Martin Salia didn't get into the medical profession to get rich, and even though he was a permanent U.S. resident, he chose to work in his native Sierra Leone because the need for surgeons there was so great.

  • New approach with elderly addicts at nursing home

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    NEW YORK (AP) — A surge in baby boomers has driven up the number of elderly people abusing drugs or alcohol, bringing more attention to the sometimes-delicate problems involved in treating addiction in the aging. Last summer, the Jewish Home Lifecare nursing home in the Bronx set out to address those issues. Patients 60 and older who come in for rehab after a hospital stay are also screened for addiction and offered a chance at recovery. Eight beds have been set aside to start, and the nursing home expects to get 480 patients a year. Associate Administrator Gregory Poole-Dayan believes it's the first nursing home to integrate addiction recovery into medical rehabilitation to reach addicts who might not otherwise seek help.

  • Justices weigh limits of free speech over Internet

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Anthony Elonis claimed he was just kidding when he posted a series of graphically violent rap lyrics on Facebook about killing his estranged wife, shooting up a kindergarten class and attacking an FBI agent. But his wife didn't see it that way. Neither did a federal jury. Elonis, who's from Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, was convicted of violating a federal law that makes it a crime to threaten another person. In a far-reaching case that probes the limits of free speech over the Internet, the Supreme Court on Monday was to consider whether Elonis' Facebook posts, and others like it, deserve protection under the First Amendment.

  • Financial tips for same-sex couples

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    NEW YORK (AP) — Gay and lesbian individuals are less prepared financially for retirement than their straight counterparts, according to an exclusive analysis by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. LGBT adults are likely to have less in retirement savings and have less access to Social Security benefits from spouses. They are also more likely to need long-term care because fewer have children to care for them as they age. Varying state laws also make it difficult for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender couples to plan for retirement. Here are planning tips for LGBT couples: KNOW LOCAL LAWS: Even though 35 of the 50 U.S. states and Washington, D.C.

  • California pushes to expand immigrant health care

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — President Barack Obama's executive order to spare some immigrants from deportation has galvanized Democrats, immigration groups and health care advocates in California to push for expanding health coverage to a segment of the population that remains uninsured. The president's action excludes immigrants who came to the country illegally from qualifying for federal health benefits. But California has its own policy of providing health coverage with state money to low-income immigrants with so-called "deferred action" that allow them to avoid deportation. Immigrant and health care advocates say that means Obama's executive order will enable hundreds of thousands of low-income immigrants in California to app

  • As HIV rises, Uganda activist tries to stop AIDS

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    KAMPALA, Uganda (AP) — The dreadlocked 26-year-old, a reformed thief and onetime drug peddler, Hood Katende is now an anti-AIDS activist respected in his Kampala slum. He urges young men to wear condoms if they can't avoid premarital sex and encourages teenage girls to reject the sexual advances of older men with money. "At night you find boys waiting for girls to rape, and I go to them and I try to talk to them not to do it," he said. "I used to be with them, smoking weed the whole day in the ghetto and moving around at night. I was a member of a gang, but now they see that I have changed day and night.

  • Florida health officials launch holiday weight

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida health officials are looking out for your waistline in a season full of eating and drinking. The Florida Department of Health has launched a free program to offer participants tips for maintaining a healthy weight during the holidays. Americans typically gain between one and five pounds throughout the holidays and most never shed that weight. State Surgeon General Dr. John Armstrong says the program includes practical steps, healthy recipes and consistent motivation. Participants will receive daily tips, mid-week challenges to get you out of a slump and support from other participants. The challenge runs through December 31. To sign up, visit www.healthiestweightflorida.com

  • Nebraska officials look to expand broadband

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — Nebraska state officials have released a plan that aims to have faster Internet service available to more households by 2020. The goals in the "Broadband in Nebraska" report include having broadband service of at least 25 megabytes per second available to 90 percent of homes, and having 90 percent of Nebraska households subscribe to broadband service. Rural areas are more expensive for carriers because the service has to cover greater distances and even then reaches relatively few paying customers. The infrastructure for high-speed Internet is costly in rural areas, but could be achieved by stringing fiber-optic cables along the same power poles maintained by Nebraska's public power districts, sai

  • Pennsylvania launches Medicaid expansion, overhaul

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — Hundreds of thousands of Pennsylvania residents left out of coverage under the 2010 federal health care law now have a chance to get insurance as the state undertakes a massive overhaul to health care for the poor. On Monday, enrollment begins in the Healthy Pennsylvania program, the name given to Pennsylvania's Medicaid expansion by outgoing Republican Gov. Tom Corbett. Coverage will begin Jan. 1, and state officials say some 600,000 people — primarily low-income, single working adults — are newly eligible for coverage under guidelines set by the 2010 law. The application process comes as the Corbett administration is overhauling benefits in Pennsylvania's existing Medicaid program.

  • Ebola test negative for Illinois resident

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    CHICAGO (AP) — Illinois officials say they have tested a state resident for Ebola but the result was negative. Dr. LaMar Hasbrouck (luh-MAHR' HAZ'-bruk) is director of the Department of Public Health. He says the person was tested last Thursday after reporting a fever. The negative test result means there are no confirmed cases of the potentially deadly illness in Illinois. Hasbrouck says the individual — who was not identified — arrived in Illinois from the African nation of Liberia on Nov. 16. The person was evaluated and found to be without symptoms and at low risk of having Ebola then, but has been monitored. Hasbrouck says people traveling to and from Africa may experience respiratory illness associated with

  • Researchers assess Adirondack moose after die-offs

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Wildlife biologists this winter are launching a three-year scientific study of moose in the Adirondack Mountains. Biologist Ed Reed of the state Department of Environmental Conservation says the agency has a rough estimate of the moose population at 500 to 1,000 animals. That's based on sightings, road kill and some aerial surveys. But he said there's never been a systematic study to get an accurate record. Scientists who saw big population declines in Minnesota and New Hampshire want to assess how New York's moose are doing.

  • U-M students to show off projects to help Jackson

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    JACKSON, Mich. (AP) — University of Michigan students are holding an open house to present the results of community projects aimed at offering new digital tools for Jackson residents. The eight projects stem from an ongoing partnership between Jackson and the School of Information at the Ann Arbor university. Working with civic organizations and government offices over the fall semester, teams of students identified the city's information needs and designed tools to meet them. The open house is planned Monday from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. at Jackson City Hall.

  • Sick child gives back

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    JACKSON, Tenn. (AP) — In May, Joseph and Stacey Holmes' lives were turned upside down when their 5-year-old daughter Brylee was diagnosed with Batten disease. "Batten is one of the most awful diseases you'll ever come across," Stacey Holmes said. "Your child is normal, and then in the blink of an eye they can't walk or talk or anything anymore; they're completely bedridden." According to the Batten Disease Support and Research Association website, the disease causes mental impairment, worsening seizures and progressive loss of sight and motor skills. Six months after her diagnosis, Brylee lives in a hospital bed in her family's living room in Savannah, Tenn. "We were just in shock," Stacey Holmes said. "I can't

  • Pennsylvania Medicaid expansion, overhaul details

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    Effective Jan. 1, Pennsylvania will expand its Medicaid guidelines to make an additional 600,000 people eligible for taxpayer-provided health care, while an overhaul of its existing Medicaid program will affect benefits for an estimated 900,000 adults already on Medicaid. Here's a look at the changes: MEDICAID EXPANSION — Named Healthy Pennsylvania, there is little difference between Healthy Pennsylvania and a Medicaid expansion, as it was envisioned by the 2010 federal law. — The expansion will make health care available to childless working adults under 65 with incomes up to $15,500 this year. Until now, they were largely ineligible for Medicaid. — The expansion also will make health care available to many

  • University, students hope to raise AIDS awareness

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Michael Moore remembers the long walk from Bethune-Cookman University to a health clinic a few miles away. He was sweating when he arrived, but not just from the late-July heat. After enduring mysterious flu-like symptoms on and off for two years, he was nervous about the results of a blood test he'd taken two weeks earlier. And when he tore into the envelope, his worst fear was realized. At age 21, Moore learned he was HIV-positive. "I've never cried so hard in my life," he recalled as he sat on a bench outside the B-CU library. "I felt like I was hit by a bus. I thought I was going to die.

  • Connecticut hearing to focus on Ebola response

    Updated: Sun, Nov 30, 2014

    HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Connecticut lawmakers have scheduled a hearing to learn more about the state's protocols for handling any future Ebola cases. The legislature's Public Health Committee is meeting Monday to get information from the Department Public Health, the Connecticut Hospital Association and others about policies currently in place to deal with any suspected cases. Windham Rep. Susan Johnson, the committee's co-chairman, says lawmakers want to determine whether there are any weaknesses in the current policies and if they need to pass new legislation when the General Assembly convenes in January. Gov. Dannel P.