• Federal government files suit against Sioux Falls landlord

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — The U.S. government has filed a lawsuit against a Sioux Falls landlord, alleging he refused to let a tenant with a fractured leg move back into an apartment over concerns that a wheelchair could damage the carpet. The suit, filed Friday in U.S. District Court in Sioux Falls on behalf of Daniel Loring, seeks unspecified damages from Calvin L. Salem and the Alice B. Salem Family Trust. Loring was using a walker in August 2013 when he leased one of the apartment building's rental units. After Loring fractured his left tibia in January 2014, he spent three months recovering in a skilled nursing facility while using a wheelchair.

  • Oklahoma City's 'Video Vigilante' now using drones to catch hookers, johns in action

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    An Oklahoma City man who uses his video camera to combat prostitution in south Oklahoma City is now using a GPS-guided drone — when the situation calls for it — to do what he calls “commercial activism.” Brian Bates, known to many as the "Video Vigilante," posted a video Aug. 6 on his JohnTV website that shows a man engaging in sex with a female prostitute near a tire dump off South Robinson Avenue. It was his first such video where the “gotcha moment” was captured using a drone, Bates said. “It's something I started carrying with me, not really knowing how it was going to work into my activism,” he said. “And I found that in very, very specific applications, I think a drone is one of the safest ways to go a

  • Woman hospitalized after lightning storm strikes Lehi

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    LEHI, Utah (AP) — A woman has been hospitalized after lightning struck near where her family gathered for a picnic in Lehi, sending her body into cardiac arrest. The 50-year-old woman wasn't hit directly, but was shocked after lightning hit a tree in the backyard of a home. The lightning strike came during a microburst that hit the area around 6:30 p.m. Sunday. Lehi Fire Battalion Chief Rick Howard says emergency crews revived the woman and rushed her to Mountain Point Medical Center, where she is in critical condition. A 20-year-old pregnant woman was also taken to a hospital after she reported feeling effects from the strike. The Sunday night storm knocked out power for nearly 1,500 residents in Lehi, American

  • When the apple itch strikes, bust out this easy baked treat

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    During my freshman year at the University of Vermont, I became a pro at apple picking, and at cooking up all those apples I picked. I probably know at least 20 different ways to bake an apple! So ever since college, it just doesn't feel like fall without a slew of apple recipes rotating through my kitchen. Luckily, apples are a great healthy choice. One small apple has about 80 calories and delivers great vitamins and 4 grams of fiber. And that means you won't be hungry after snacking on one (or eating one for dessert). Sure, many of the calories come from sugars, but with all that fiber, it's unlikely you'll be sitting down to consume huge quantities of them at one time. My favorite apple concoction is apple pie a la mode.

  • A racial gap in kidney transplants closes but work remains

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    CHICAGO (AP) — A racial gap in kidney transplants appears to have closed. That's according to an analysis of data on nearly 200,000 end-stage kidney disease patients. The study shows the transplant rate for blacks climbed from 93 per 1,000 patients in 1998 to about 128 per 1,000 patients in 2010 and 2011. The rate was the same for whites. Dr. Jesse Sammon is the senior author and a urologist at the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit. He says the trend likely stems from a 2003 change in a national allocation policy for donor kidneys. That change eased a restriction on certain partially matched donor kidneys. Advanced kidney disease is more common in blacks but they are less likely to be referred for transplants.

  • Groups ask Kasich to end funds to Planned Parenthood

    Updated: 20 hr ago

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Anti-abortion groups in Ohio have called on Gov. John Kasich to block Medicaid payments to Planned Parenthood, though federal health officials have warned other states that such a move could violate the law. Ohio Right to Life and a coalition of other anti-abortion groups want Kasich, a Republican presidential contender, to stop taxpayer money from going to Planned Parenthood. The groups cite the release of secretly recorded videos by anti-abortion activists showing Planned Parenthood employees describing how they provide fetal tissue from abortions for medical research. Planned Parenthood has said the videos are heavily edited and misleading.

  • Ruling: Medical pot caregivers must abide by amount limit

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    TUCSON, Ariz. (AP) — A new Arizona court ruling says medical marijuana caregivers must abide by the legal limit set by state law for how much pot they can possess to provide to qualified registered patients. The Court of Appeals said Friday that a judge in Tucson wrongly ruled that Ryan Mitchell Gillie could attempt to invoke an immunity provision of the state's medical marijuana law. That provision allows a registered caregiver to possess 2.5 ounces of marijuana for a designated patient. Prosecutors argued that the provision didn't apply because Gillie had 3.5 ounces of marijuana though he was designated as caregiver for only one patient.

  • National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism National Inst

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, National Institutes of Health. Visit www.CollegeDrinkingPrevention.gov.

  • Lawrence drug sweeps take $1M in heroin off streets

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    LAWRENCE, Mass. (AP) — Police say series of drug sweeps in Lawrence and surrounding communities this summer has resulted in about 250 arrests and the seizure of more than $1 million worth of heroin and a dozen illegal firearms. "Operation Cold Turkey," which also netted about $1 million in cash, involved Lawrence, Methuen and Andover drug detectives, with help from state and federal authorities. Lawrence Police Capt. Roy Vasque, who leads the department's Street Narcotics Enforcement Unit, tells The Eagle-Tribune (http://bit.ly/1hrjkD7) that the majority of those arrested during the 2-month sweep were young people battling addiction. But police say they also took major drug traffickers off the streets.

  • EDITORIAL: Another tragedy shows need for a treatment law

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    Opponents of New Mexico adopting an assisted outpatient treatment law for mentally ill residents in crisis – one that would trigger an evaluation, even a brief detention for a psychiatric exam – refer to it as “forced treatment.” But how many more tragedies will it take to force New Mexico lawmakers to finally step up and provide an alternative to a police response for mentally ill individuals in crisis, as well as their families and the public? Those opponents claim that a treatment law would not have prevented the quintuple homicide by schizophrenic John Hyde or the fatal police shooting of paranoid schizophrenic James Boyd. They say those high-profile cases are anomalies; they argue individual civil rights tr

  • Suspect in labor commissioner's fatal stabbing said victim was in 'cult,' mental health records show

    Yesterday

    The murder suspect accused of fatally stabbing his father, the state's labor commissioner, had delusions that his family was in a "cult," his confidential mental health records show. Christian Erin Costello, 26, of Oklahoma City, was arrested Aug. 23 at an ice cream store in north Oklahoma City after repeatedly stabbing his father, Mark Costello, with a kitchen knife, police said. The family said in a statement Aug. 24 that Christian Costello "struggles with a mental health disease." The victim died Aug. 23 at a hospital from stab wounds to the neck. He was 59 and had been the state's labor commissioner since his election in 2010.

  • Farmington therapist's practice offers juvenile sex offenders a second chance

    Yesterday

    FARMINGTON — A Farmington therapist stands by her belief that young people who commit sex offenses are worthy of a second chance at a healthy, normal life. Alisha Hawthorne-Martinez is a clinical social worker and drug and alcohol abuse counselor licensed with the state. She previously specialized in treating patients with a history of drug and alcohol abuse, but she said her growing awareness of sexual offenses throughout San Juan County — especially by those 18 and younger — has given her therapy practice a new direction. Starting in May, she began treating young people who commit sexual offenses, in addition to her practice's usual case load of clients with mental health issues.

  • Medical marijuana cultivation center takes shape near Anna

    Yesterday

    ANNA, Ill. (AP) — The owner of a southern Illinois medical marijuana cultivation center says he expects his new facility to be complete by next month. Wellness Group Pharms managing partner Paul Montes tells WSIU-TV (bit.ly/1UfEIwO ) that construction of a 27,000-square-foot indoor growing warehouse outside Anna is expected to be finished in September. Montes told the Union County Economic Development Corporation he plans to initially hire between 25 and 30 workers but hopes that his workforce will be much larger once the state pilot project begins in earnest. He expects to harvest the first pot crops in January.

  • Lawmakers continue work on future of Sununu Center

    Yesterday

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — Having ruled out the possibility of closure, lawmakers are studying ideas for expanding or repurposing part of the state's only secure juvenile detention center. A legislative working group tasked with evaluating the future of the Sununu Youth Services Center meets Monday for the second time. Budget writers have been seeking to cut costs at the center as the number of youth offenders is declining. The center houses teenagers between the ages of 11 and 18 who have been committed by a court, but only about one third of the available 144 beds are occupied. Lawmakers want to explore whether part of the center could be used to treat teenagers suffering from drug addiction or mental illness. The meeting

  • Singapore softens ban on HIV-positive visitors

    Yesterday

    SINGAPORE (AP) — Singapore said Monday it has lifted a two-decade ban on HIV-infected people from entering the country, but will limit their stay to a maximum of three months. The Health Ministry said the ban was lifted on April 1, "given the current context with more than 5,000 Singapore residents living with HIV and the availability of effective treatment for the disease." The three-month restriction is apparently aimed at preventing long-term residence by foreigners, such as those looking to work in the island-nation or looking to accompany a child studying here.

  • 'Awakenings' author, neurologist Oliver Sacks dies at 82

    Yesterday

    NEW YORK (AP) — An author and neurologist who explored the wonders of the human brain in books like "Awakenings" has died. Dr. Oliver Sacks was 82. Sack's assistant, Kate Edgar, says he died Sunday at his home in New York City. Sacks had announced in February that he was terminally ill with a rare eye cancer that had spread to his liver. As a neurologist, Sacks looked at some of his patients with a writer's eye and found new ways of explaining how all human brains function. His book "Awakenings," about patients who spent years in a helpless, almost frozen state, was made into an Oscar-nominated 1990 movie starring Robin Williams.

  • Farmington therapists's practice offers juvenile sex offenders a second chance

    Updated: Sun, Aug 30, 2015

    FARMINGTON — A Farmington therapist stands by her belief that young people who commit sex offenses are worthy of a second chance at a healthy, normal life. Alisha Hawthorne-Martinez is a clinical social worker and drug and alcohol abuse counselor licensed with the state. She previously specialized in treating patients with a history of drug and alcohol abuse, but she said her growing awareness of sexual offenses throughout San Juan County — especially by those 18 and younger — has given her therapy practice a new direction. Starting in May, she began treating young people who commit sexual offenses, in addition to her practice's usual case load of clients with mental health issues.

  • Missing hiker found in Sierra Nevada recovering from surgery

    Updated: Sun, Aug 30, 2015

    FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — The family of a woman who was rescued after being stranded in the rugged Sierra Nevada for nine days said Sunday that she is recovering from surgery to set the broken bones on her lower left leg. Miyuki Harwood's family said in a statement that she has asked for "uninterrupted rest and quiet." Harwood, 62, was found Saturday morning in a remote area of the Sierra National Forest after she used a whistle to get the attention of a search and rescue team looking for her. To survive, Harwood crawled for about two days from where she was injured to a creek where she could scoop water into a bottle with a filter inside. She was in good spirits but exhausted when she was admitted at a Fresno hospi

  • 6 San Quentin inmates ill with Legionnaires' disease

    Updated: Sun, Aug 30, 2015

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — At least six San Quentin State Prison inmates were ill with Legionnaires' disease and dozens more under observation Sunday, prompting a weekend halt to visitors, no hot meals and limited drinking water supplies at California's oldest prison. At least 51 inmates are under observation for respiratory illness at the prison's medical unit, said Dana Simas, a spokeswoman with the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation. Cooking at the prison has stopped because Legionella bacteria grow in water and spread through water molecules. Instead inmates are being served boxed meals, Simas said. Water use at California's oldest prison has been limited since last week, when an inmate was hos

  • 'Awakenings' author, neurologist Oliver Sacks dies at 82

    Updated: Sun, Aug 30, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — There was the blind man who had the disastrous experience of regaining his sight. The surgeon who developed a sudden passion for music after being struck by lightning. And most famously, the man who mistook his wife for a hat. Those stories and many more, taking the reader to the distant ranges of human experience, came from the pen of Dr. Oliver Sacks. Sacks, 82, died Sunday at his home in New York City, his assistant, Kate Edgar, said. In February, he had announced that he was terminally ill with a rare eye cancer that had spread to his liver. As a practicing neurologist, Sacks looked at some of his patients with a writer's eye and found publishing gold.




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