• Church members each get $500 to do good for world

    Yesterday

    CHICAGO (AP) — On a very memorable Sunday, Pastor Laura Truax surprised her congregation with a bold announcement: She was about to hand out money to everyone. Not a huge sum, but the pastor said the LaSalle Street Church had received a tidy $1.6 million from a real estate deal, and $160,000 — a typical 10 percent tithe — would be divided among some 320 regular attendees. Each would get a $500 check to do something positive for anything or anyone, including themselves. It was an unorthodox gesture, but Truax notes, LaSalle is "a gutsy little church" with a history of making waves around socially progressive causes it embraces.

  • UNH promoting healthier choices at meals

    Yesterday

    DURHAM, N.H. (AP) — The University of New Hampshire is going to start offering more fruits and vegetables and lower-calorie desserts at its dining areas. The changes are coming as a result of UNH signing on to the Partnership for a Healthier America's Healthier Campus Initiative, a three-year commitment to make the campus healthier by adopting guidelines around food, nutrition, physical activity and programming.

  • Maine communities get $1M for in-home health care

    Yesterday

    AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — Four Maine communities are getting more than $1 million to develop ways to help people who are sick or elderly stay in their homes. The goal of the grants from the Maine Health Access Foundation is to improve services so that people can receive care in their homes rather than having to go to a hospital or nursing home. The four grant recipients are: The Aroostook Area Agency on Aging, the Bucksport Bay Healthy Communities Coalition, Charlotte White Center in Dover-Foxcroft and Washington Hancock County Action in Blue Hill.

  • Construction underway on medical building

    Yesterday

    NORTHFIELD, Vt. (AP) — Construction is underway on a new medical building on the campus of Norwich University in Northfield. The new Green Mountain Family Practice building is a collaboration of the Central Vermont Medical Center, Norwich University and E.F. Wall and Associates. Central Vermont Medical Center President Judy Tartaglia says the building will allow more room for primary care practitioners and physical therapy. An orthopedics and sports medicine doctor will have office hours there. The building will be used by members of both the Norwich and Northfield communities. Dignitaries held a ground breaking on the project last week.

  • Does bad behavior really hurt business?

    Yesterday

    NEW YORK (AP) — Silicon Valley seems to have more than its share of companies behaving badly. Among up-and-comers in the tech world, privacy abuses and executive gaffes have become viral sensations. But is all that bad behavior actually bad for business? Last week, Uber sparked controversy after a top executive suggested spending $1 million to dig up dirt on a journalist critical of the driver-on-demand company. It's only the latest time Uber has been called out, either for actions by its drivers or its corporate culture. The company also is investigating one of its New York employees for tracking another journalist's ride, which has raised fears that Uber is misusing customers' private location information.

  • Sioux Fall surgeons' group stops selling implants

    Yesterday

    SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — A group of Sioux Falls surgeons has stopped selling surgical implants at a local hospital amid concerns over conflicts of interest and legality. The Argus Leader reports (http://argusne.ws/1ywLI9G ) Great Plains Surgical Distributors is owned by nine Orthopedic Institute surgeons who work at the nearby Sioux Falls Specialty Hospital. The hospital management launched an inquiry into the distributor this summer and ordered a cease and desist. Its owners say such distributorships can lower health care costs and that they have been closely following federal laws. Critics say doctors profit from the devices they use in surgeries, which gives them an incentive to do more procedures.

  • UK police: up to 5 terror plots foiled this year

    Yesterday

    LONDON (AP) — The head of London's police force said Sunday that as many as five terror plots were foiled this year, as he warned of increasing pressure on resources amid the rising threat. Metropolitan Police Commissioner Bernard Hogan-Howe told the BBC that normally security services disrupt one plot annually. However, he said this year alone authorities have disrupted "we think four or five." Police have become increasingly concerned about young people traveling to fight in Syria and becoming radicalized by the Islamic State group. The fear is that they will return and wage attacks at home. Authorities estimate that some 500 British jihadists have traveled to Syria.

  • Guam private hospital won't open until '15

    Yesterday

    HAGATNA, Guam (AP) — Bogged down by construction delays, Guam's first private hospital is unable to open next month as previously planned. The Guam Regional Medical City issued a statement saying it "anticipates a delay in the opening of its new state-of-the-art hospital until early next year." The hospital's management attributed a statement to construction contractor dck Pacific project director Don Hergenreder that "additional time is necessary to complete construction while ensuring quality and safety." "The GRMC/dck team remains committed to the completion of the hospital using the highest standards," said Margaret Bengzon, the hospital's chief executive officer. "We will deliver a first-class facility and world-

  • Cleanup on, flood threat looms after huge NY snow

    Yesterday

    BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — The weekend offered the Buffalo region a chance to dig out of record levels of deep snow before a flood warning took effect because of rising temperatures and rain. With roughly the equivalent of six inches of rain tied up in the snowpack, volunteers moved through the area assisting residents. Beth Bragg's home was spared the worst of a lake-effect storm that buried parts of the Buffalo area under more than 7 feet of snow. But she still was out first-thing Saturday with her shovel — along with hundreds of other volunteers. "I know that people really need to get shoveled out, especially some of the older folks, so I'm just doing my part to help out," said the bank manager and "shovel brigade" mem

  • Computer science students seek software proposals

    Yesterday

    FAIRBANKS, Alaska (AP) — Computer science students at the University of Alaska Fairbanks are looking for software design proposals as part of their learning process. UAF officials say the projects allow public service and private organizations, as well as governments, to get free software while students get experience. Officials say more than 65 successful projects have been developed by students over the past two decades. Project clients work with students and are involved in evaluating the results. Dec. 1 is the deadline to submit proposals and get feedback allowing the submission of revised proposals. Jan. 13 is the final deadline to submit proposals for software design projects. ___ Online:

  • Rhodes scholars named for 2015

    Yesterday

    The 32 American students chosen as Rhodes scholars for 2015, listed by geographical region: District 1: Noam Angrist, Brookline, Mass., Massachusetts Institute of Technology Benjamin D. Sprung-Keyser, Los Angeles, Harvard University District 2: Matthew J. Townsend, Chappaqua, N.Y., Yale University Ruth C. Fong, Somerset, N.J., Harvard District 3: Joseph W. Barrett, Port Washington, N.Y., Princeton Gabriel M. Zucker, Brooklyn, N.Y., Yale District 4: Jordan R. Konell, Philadelphia, Yale Kate I. Nussenbaum, Newton, Mass., Brown District 5: Fang Y. Cao, Silver Spring, Md., University of Maryland Maya I. Krishnan, Rockville, Md., Stanford University <

  • Kohler introduces odor-eating toilet seat

    Updated: Sat, Nov 22, 2014

    MILWAUKEE (AP) — Blow out the candle and ditch the aerosol can. Kohler Co. has introduced a deodorizing toilet seat that it says eliminates embarrassing bathroom odors and the need for candles and sprays to cover them up. A fan hidden in the battery-operated seat sucks in air and pushes it through an odor-eating carbon filter, followed by an optional scent pack. Product manager Jerry Bougher said the idea is to attack smells "where the action is." The $90 seat is one of many high-tech gadgets that Wisconsin-based Kohler and its competitors have introduced in recent years to make time spent in the bathroom more pleasant.

  • NC Republicans pick Moore to be new House speaker

    Updated: Sat, Nov 22, 2014

    ASHEBORO, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina Republican lawmakers on Saturday picked state Rep. Tim Moore of Cleveland County to become the next leader of the state House of Representatives. House Republicans selected the 44-year-old Kings Mountain attorney and metal recycling company owner as their nominee to succeed Thom Tillis, who is headed to the U.S. Senate after defeating incumbent Democrat Kay Hagan earlier this month. The official selection of House speaker and other leaders isn't until January, but with Republicans holding 74 seats in the 120-member House, Moore is destined to take over the top job short of a surprise in the next two months. Moore said he'll have a differing management style than Tillis. "Tom'

  • Ohio college building indoor drone pavilion

    Updated: Sat, Nov 22, 2014

    CINCINNATI (AP) — An indoor flying pavilion for students to test and fly drones will be built at a college in southwestern Ohio. Sinclair Community College officials say the 40-foot high pavilion resembling a traditional aircraft hangar will be built adjacent to a building in Dayton that houses some of its education and training programs in unmanned aerial systems and aviation. The indoor pavilion will allow students to fly drones without having to deal with weather issues or Federal Aviation Administration restrictions on flying them outdoors, said Andrew Shepherd, director of Sinclair's unmanned aerial systems program. Congress has directed the FAA to integrate drones into civilian manned airspace by next fall.

  • Survey: NH retailers expect boost in holiday sales

    Updated: Sat, Nov 22, 2014

    BOW, N.H. (AP) — A survey shows New Hampshire retailers are expecting holiday sales to be up 4.3 percent, slightly higher than the national expectation. The survey by the New Hampshire Retail Association says 77 percent of retailers are anticipating their 2014 holiday sales will be the same or better than last year. A total of 69 percent of respondents said that their 2014 inventory levels are the same or better than last year's levels. About 53 percent of the association's members offer online shopping, and they expect that online sales will account for up to 25 percent of their entire holiday sales. A total of 69 percent surveyed said they are using social media.

  • NY's poor gain from health insurance changes

    Updated: Sat, Nov 22, 2014

    NEW YORK (AP) — A year into New York's operation of a medical insurance exchange, more than half of the people with new coverage qualified for Medicaid — the federal program for the poor — and many didn't know they were eligible until the push under the Affordable Care Act. Overall, 370,604 people were enrolled with commercial and nonprofit insurers, 525,283 in Medicaid; and 64,875 in the state's Child Health Plus coverage for families with moderate incomes. That's a total of 960,762. With most of the gains coming in Medicaid, here are snapshots of how the first year played out in two of New York's poorer counties: THE BRONX Out of New York state's 62 counties, the Bronx is dead last when it comes to health.

  • AstraZeneca adding 300 jobs in Maryland

    Updated: Sat, Nov 22, 2014

    FREDERICK, Md. (AP) — Pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca says it will bring 300 new jobs to Maryland with a $200 million project to expand a Frederick manufacturing center. The Frederick News-Post (http://bit.ly/1y1LcCg ) reports the company said Friday in a news release that the expansion will allow the company to increase production at its MedImmune facility. The Gaithersburg-based MedImmune is a subsidiary of the London-based AstraZeneca. Work to enlarge the manufacturing center by 40,000 square feet is expected to begin in December and finish in 2017. A company spokeswoman says a majority of the 300 manufacturing, laboratory and administrative positions will be filled by 2017. The state of Maryland agreed to provide

  • Report questions role of wealth in Lanza's care

    Updated: Sat, Nov 22, 2014

    HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — A new report asks whether the race and affluence of Adam Lanza's family influenced decisions about how to care for his mental health problems in the years before he committed the 2012 Sandy Hook Elementary School massacre. Among the findings in the report, which was released Friday by the state office of Child Advocate, is that Lanza's his parents and educators contributed to his social isolation by accommodating — and not confronting — his difficulties engaging with the world. The report said recommendations from Yale psychologists that he be medicated and undergo rigorous treatment as a child for anxiety and other conditions were rejected by his mother, who eventually took him out of school.

  • Assisted suicide opponents meet in Connecticut

    Updated: Sat, Nov 22, 2014

    WINDSOR LOCKS, Conn. (AP) — Organizers say about 140 people have turned out for a daylong conference on assisted suicide. The two-day event, dubbed East Coast Against Assisted Suicide, was wrapping up on Saturday in Windsor Locks. It was sponsored by several groups that oppose legislation legalizing the practice, including the Connecticut-based Family Institute of Connecticut and Second Thoughts Connecticut. Other sponsors included the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition and Second Thoughts Massachusetts. Speakers include experts from the region and around the world who oppose assisted suicide legislation in the U.S., particularly the East Coast.

  • ND fire department urging people to cook safely

    Updated: Sat, Nov 22, 2014

    BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — A fire department in North Dakota is urging residents to take into consideration safety measures while cooking this holiday season. Bismarck firefighters are advising people to keep a close eye on food cooking inside the oven or microwave. They add that children and pets should stay at least three feet away from cooking areas. The department is also reminding residents to never pour water on a grease fire and never discharge a fire extinguisher onto a pan fire, as it can spray or shoot burning grease around the kitchen. The National Fire Protection Association says cooking is the leading cause of home fires in the country. More cooking safety tips are available at the department's website.<