• Florida diver shot, seriously injured by another diver

    Updated: Sun, Jul 5, 2015

    SARASOTA, Fla. (AP) — Authorities are ruling it an accident after a Florida diver shot and seriously injured a fellow diver in Sarasota. The two spear fishers were underwater near the Sarasota Yacht Club on Saturday when police say Dale Bartush's spear gun accidentally discharged and hit 21-year-old Jarrod Ditmars in the head. Bartush, 24, immediately grabbed his friend and swam to the surface to yell for help. Ditmars was taken to the hospital and is in intensive care with life threatening injuries. The incident snarled traffic as authorities closed one direction of the John Ringling Causeway.

  • New home for eagles at Ohio wildlife rehabilitation center

    Updated: Sun, Jul 5, 2015

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Back in April, Ron Short and Mary Kay Kuzma were walking their dogs near their Powell home when Kuzma noticed something big and brown standing in a neighbor's yard. Kuzma thought she was looking at a wooden statue. "Then it moved," recalled Short, 55. The big and brown thing turned out to be an injured juvenile bald eagle, which a wildlife officer captured and took to the Ohio Wildlife Center on Columbus' northwest side. The bird, about 3 years old, underwent surgery to fix his misaligned beak — making him the second eagle admitted to the rehabilitation center this year and the seventh in the 31 years of the nonprofit entity.

  • St. Louis heroin addicts get a shot to rebuild lives

    Updated: Sun, Jul 5, 2015

    ST. LOUIS • After years of being a frequent flier in and out of Missouri’s prison system, Dante Bonzano seems to have something new on his mind: a conscience. “My poor mom,” he said. And the mother of his three children? “I put that woman through hell the past 10½ years,” he said. Bonzano, 33, of south St. Louis, used to ignore the wrath of addiction because booze and heroin were king. He kept using even when people around him died from overdoses. Drug treatment behind bars or in the community didn’t work. Until now. For the past seven months, Bonzano has been trying a medication-assisted treatment plan that he credits for helping save his life and family. Each month, as per the terms of

  • NY health officials warn of mosquito risk

    Updated: Sun, Jul 5, 2015

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Public health officials in New York state are reminding residents of the dangers posed by mosquitoes after West Nile Virus was found in two counties. The New York State Department of Health says members of the public can protect themselves by eliminating standing water in their yards. Used tires, pots, clogged gutters, pools and outdoor recycling containers can all serve as mosquito breeding areas. In addition, residents should also use repellants and avoid outdoor activities when mosquitoes are most active. West Nile Virus has been found in mosquitoes trapped this year in Rockland and Suffolk counties. It's the first time this year the disease has been identified in the state.

  • Court rules against damage caps for medical malpractice

    Updated: Sun, Jul 5, 2015

    FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — A Florida court has ruled that caps on certain damages in medical malpractice lawsuits do not apply in personal injury cases. The Legislature in 2003 established $500,000 limits on non-economic damages for such cases. Last year, the state Supreme Court ruled they don't apply in medical malpractice cases involving wrongful death. The 4th District Court of Appeal extended that decision last week to personal injury cases. Attorney Crane Johnstone of Fort Lauderdale's Schlesinger Law Offices says the ruling could open the door statewide to more personal injury medical malpractice lawsuits. The appeals court's decision reinstates a $4.

  • 5 sentenced in $25M Medicare fraud involving Nicaragua, D.R.

    Updated: Sun, Jul 5, 2015

    MIAMI (AP) — Five people have been sent to federal prison for their roles in a $25 million Medicare fraud scheme that involved people from Nicaragua and the Dominican Republic posing as U.S. patients. The sentences imposed last week by a Miami federal judge ranged from 15 months to four years. The five defendants are among 10 who have pleaded guilty after they were charged last year in a 36-count grand jury indictment. One person, 70-year-old Jose Eloy Sanchez, remains at large and is believed to be in Nicaragua. Court records show the scheme involved use of foreign individuals to pose as if they were Florida residents in the filing of fraudulent Medicare claims. The group used false addresses and paid foreigners to t

  • Immigrant children given adult dose of hepatitis A vaccine

    Updated: Sat, Jul 4, 2015

    SAN ANTONIO (AP) — About 250 immigrant children were given an adult dose of a hepatitis A vaccine at a Texas detention facility where they were being held with their mothers, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials. The vaccines were administered this week, but none of the children has been hospitalized or had any adverse reactions, ICE officials said Saturday ICE spokesman Richard Rocha said health care professionals will monitor the children over the next five days for any potential side effects, though none are expected. "Parents at the facility were advised and counseled by medical professionals about potential side effects, with services made available in multiple languages," Rocha said in

  • Radiation errors investigated at St. Cloud cancer center

    Updated: Sat, Jul 4, 2015

    ST. CLOUD, Minn. (AP) — An internal investigation has found that some patients at the CentraCare Health Coborn Cancer Center in St. Cloud received improper doses of radiation, resulting in discipline and firings of some employees. CentraCare President and CEO Ken Holmen told the St. Cloud Times that the errors affected "a small group" of patients. He wouldn't give a number but said they've all been contacted. He also would not say how many employees have been disciplined or fired, but said they included people with leadership roles in the radiation oncology department. Holmen said most of the affected patients didn't get enough radiation, meaning a small increase in the chance of a recurrence of their cancer.

  • Wildlife group: Bird ban hurts educational presentations

    Updated: Sat, Jul 4, 2015

    DAYTON, Ohio (AP) — A recent ban meant to protect Ohio's $2.3 billion poultry industry from a deadly bird flu virus has hampered educational wildlife presentations, environmental educators and volunteers argue. The Ohio Wildlife Rehabilitators Association has requested to meet with the state's agriculture department to find a compromise on the ban, the Dayton Daily News reported (http://bit.ly/1GXjK9n ). Ohio announced the ban in June due to the threat of the bird flu virus that has led to the deaths of 48 million birds. The order canceled poultry auctions, swap meets and all other gatherings of birds for show or sale as well as fairs.

  • Ohio community seeks clues, fights fear after 6 women vanish

    Updated: Sat, Jul 4, 2015

    CHILLICOTHE, Ohio (AP) — The fate of six women — four of them dead, two missing for months — has people on edge in this small southern Ohio city as relatives seek clues, seemingly in vain, to whatever happened to their loved ones. Grieving family members and nervous residents worry about a serial killer in their midst. Police say they aren't ruling anything out, but say it's more likely the women's troubled histories caught up with them in deadly ways. All were drug addicts and several had prostituted themselves to feed their habit. Police also say that because the women ran in the same circles, someone knows the fuller story. "There's that one person out there that has the information that's going to break this c

  • Marshall neuroscience chief jumped at chance to hire surgeon

    Updated: Sat, Jul 4, 2015

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — Marshall University has recruited a noted surgeon who ran into trouble experimenting with human brains using bowel bacteria but will continue the same research on rats under tight restrictions. Dr. Paul Muizelaar and another doctor left the University of California, Davis, in 2013 after officials concluded their actions violated the school's code of conduct. Muizelaar had been the university's neurosurgery chief for 15 years. At Marshall University in Huntington, neuroscience chief Dr. Anthony Alberico's interest in recommending Muizelaar's hiring last year was based in part on the sports analogy that if a star free agent is available, go after him.

  • Maine getting $20K to research bat killing disease

    Updated: Sat, Jul 4, 2015

    AUGUSTA, Maine (AP) — Maine is getting about $20,000 in federal money to research and address white-nose syndrome, a disease that sickens and kills little brown bats. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is awarding the money as part of nearly $1 million in grants to 35 states and Washington, D.C. Officials say state natural resource agencies will use the money for research, — to monitor bat populations and to respond to the disease. The fish and wildlife service's national white-nose syndrome coordinator says the disease has been confirmed in 26 states and five Canadian provinces. The syndrome is a disease caused by a fungus that interrupts bat hibernation. It robs the animals of energy and stored fat. It was first d

  • After year of Washington legal pot sales, taxes top $70M

    Updated: Sat, Jul 4, 2015

    SEATTLE (AP) — Washington launched its second-in-the-nation legal marijuana market with just a handful of stores selling high-priced pot to long lines of customers. A year later, the state has about 160 shops open, tax revenues have soared past expectations and sales top $1.4 million per day. And who knows — the industry might even start making some money. Washington pot farmers, processors and retailers have complained all year that heavy state and federal tax burdens, along with competition from an unregulated medical marijuana market, have made it difficult for them to do business.

  • W.Va. Capitol walk July 11 takes aim at drug addiction

    Updated: Sat, Jul 4, 2015

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — Community activists plan a Charleston awareness walk in one week to tackle the stigma of drug addiction. Organizers of the Capitol grounds walk on July 11 want participants to gain strength and hope by meeting others with similar stories. The walk is being sponsored by a group called Warriors of Hope. Volunteer Susan Busby tells the Charleston Gazette and Mail (http://bit.ly/1KAXNV0) they want to show that addiction affects people from all walks of life. The walk is intended to put a face on the problem. Busby says her own son is a heroin addict. Busby and several others started the Warriors for Hope to counter drug addiction and offer support. ___ Information from: The Charl

  • NC legislators want Medicaid reform before expansion

    Updated: Sat, Jul 4, 2015

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — Despite a key win in the Supreme Court and pressure from liberal activists, North Carolina's legislative leaders said this past week that they have no plans to expand the state's Medicaid rolls through President Barack Obama's 2010 health care law. Demonstrators who have routinely come to the Legislative Building to protest Republican policies arrived again this past week on the coattails of a Supreme Court decision to uphold subsidies for individuals who purchased insurance on federal exchanges. They demanded Republican Gov. Pat McCrory and General Assembly leaders either accept federal funding to expand Medicaid enrollment through the Affordable Care Act, or come up with their own plan to close the insuranc

  • St. Louis-area law enforcement leads initiative to tackle heroin cases

    Updated: Sat, Jul 4, 2015

    ST. LOUIS • The 40 or so police officers, special agents, prosecutors and investigators who sat in the training room shared some heroin battle stories: • The autistic boy who sat in the child abuse investigator’s office, imitating the gurgling noises he heard when his mom overdosed. • The heroin dealer who slept with a gun stuffed in a pillowcase resting across his stomach, in case police raided his house. • The addict who gave birth to a baby addicted to methadone who wouldn’t let the grandmother care for the baby as she continued to use. They were not at the St. Louis Regional Heroin Summit to simply swap battle stories — they wanted to agree to a battle plan.

  • Officials warn of firecrackers' impact on veterans with PTSD

    Updated: Sat, Jul 4, 2015

    ATLANTA (AP) — Health care professionals are asking Georgians who are using firecrackers to celebrate the Fourth of July to be cautious around veterans who have post-traumatic stress disorder. Psychologist Corissa Callahan works with veterans at the Shepherd Center in Atlanta and tells WABE-FM (http://bit.ly/1RWscMi ) firecrackers are one of the biggest triggers of PTSD symptoms in veterans. Callahan says the unexpected sounds can cause flashbacks to combat and provoke anxiety in veterans with PTSD. Callahan says neighbors letting veterans with PTSD know in advance about plans to light firecrackers can help avoid unintentionally provoking flashbacks. The Georgia Department of Veterans Service says roughly 752,000 vete

  • Fireworks shoot into Colorado crowd; 9 suffer minor burns

    Updated: Sat, Jul 4, 2015

    AVON, Colo. (AP) — Officials say nine people suffered minor burns during an accident at a fireworks show in Colorado. Virginia Egger, the town manager in Avon, says a malfunction caused a fireworks shell to explode in its tube rather than firing into the sky Friday night. She says the misfired shell caused a rack of shells to tip, causing two or three shells to go off toward the crowd. The accident occurred about 17 minutes into the 23-minute fireworks show over Nottingham Lake, bringing the event to a halt. The annual event attracts about 20,000 people. Jane Imber tells NBC News that there wasn't a lot of room in between groups of people, so people couldn't get up and run. The cause of the malfunction is under

  • Right to die: Colombian man ends life with government backup

    Updated: Sat, Jul 4, 2015

    BOGOTA, Colombia (AP) — Dr. Gustavo Quintana walks out of a modest, two-floor apartment building in southern Bogota. Inside his black doctor's bag are vials containing anesthesia and muscle relaxants, a syringe and a rubber tourniquet. The man known in Colombia as Dr. Death has just ended the life of his 234th patient: a middle-aged woman suffering from incurable stomach cancer. For years, Quintana and a handful of other physicians have been performing what they consider mercy killings in a semi-clandestine state, at risk of prosecution and amid widespread rejection from other doctors and church officials.

  • The Oklahoman, Oklahoma City, Jenni Carlson column

    Updated: Fri, Jul 3, 2015

    EL RENO – Tyrone Lewis made a decision as a freshman at El Reno. He let people know about it, too. “I’m going to be the head coach here,” he would say. It was a quite a proclamation for a kid who’d done anything to get kicked out of school only a few years earlier. Pick a fight. Talk back. He hated being there, so lots of days, he’d find a way out. But wrestling changed all that. Wrestling became his way out. Now, he’s hoping to introduce a new generation to the sport that transformed his life. He became a state champion at El Reno and an All-American at Oklahoma State. He wrestled all around the world and fell just short of the Olympics.




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