• Nurse imprisoned in Ohio malnutrition death has new charges

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    DAYTON, Ohio (AP) — A nurse serving a 10-year prison sentence in the malnutrition death of an Ohio teenager with cerebral palsy has been charged with health care fraud. Federal authorities say 45-year-old Mollie Parsons recently was indicted on four counts of health care fraud. A message seeking comment was left Tuesday for her attorney. Parsons pleaded guilty to involuntary manslaughter and other counts in the 2011 death of 14-year-old Makayla Norman, who weighed 28 pounds. Parsons' job had been to administer care to Makayla in the teenager's Dayton home. The federal indictment alleges Parsons and others schemed to defraud Medicaid regarding the girl's care.

  • Coroner awaits test results of soccer player hit by car

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — The coroner's office said Tuesday it will await the results of blood and urine tests before determining what caused the death of a University of California, Berkeley, soccer player who was hit by a car on a Los Angeles freeway. Medical examiners usually determine someone hit by a car died of blunt force traumas. But because of the circumstances in the death of Eloi Vasquez, the doctor handling the autopsy opted to wait as long as 10 weeks for the toxicology results, coroner's Lt. Fred Corral said. Vasquez, 19, was killed as he ran across eastbound Interstate 10 about a mile from the University of Southern California after attending a Tau Kappa Epsilon fraternity party during his spring break visit to Los

  • Prosecutors: Medicaid scam exploited poor who needed shoes

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Authorities investigating allegations of a Medicaid scam involving doctors and others in New York City recall coming across something curious in a lower floor of a clinic: stacks of shoe boxes containing cheap, off-brand sneakers, boots and sandals in a variety of sizes. Downstairs was "like a shoe store," Brooklyn District Attorney Ken Thompson said Tuesday at a news conference. "How many clinics have that?" Prosecutors say the footwear stockpile was further proof that the clinic was part of a ring that used shoe giveaways to lure poor people into a scheme that cheated Medicaid out of nearly $7 million over a two-year period.

  • New trial for man convicted of killing wife's grandma in '87

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — The Connecticut Supreme Court on Tuesday ordered a new trial for a brain-damaged man sentenced to life in prison for the 1987 killing of his wife's 88-year-old grandmother — a conviction protested by high-profile supporters including writers Arthur Miller and William Styron. The court ruled 4-2 that Richard Lapointe, 69, was deprived of a fair trial because prosecutors failed to disclose notes by a police officer that may have supported an alibi defense. The decision upholds an earlier ruling by the state Appellate Court, which in 2012 overturned Lapointe's convictions for capital felony murder, sexual assault and other crimes.

  • Haslam's Insure Tennessee plan fails again in committee vote

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Republican Gov. Bill Haslam's proposal to extend health coverage to 280,000 low-income Tennesseans failed again Tuesday, voted down by a key Senate committee a month after it was defeated in a special legislative session. The Senate Commerce Committee voted 6-2 against the measure on Tuesday. One committee member abstained from voting. Following the special session, the proposal had been resurrected on a 6-2 vote in the Senate Health Committee. However, prospects for passage this last time were slim, even though Haslam tried to make his case with individual committee members. Before Tuesday's vote, sponsors of the legislation tried to assure committee members their concerns about the prop

  • 5 US aid workers monitored for Ebola in Nebraska released

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — All five American aid workers being monitored in Nebraska for exposure to Ebola have completed their quarantine periods free from symptoms of the deadly virus. Nebraska Medical Center spokesman Taylor Wilson said Tuesday that four of the individuals who were brought to Omaha earlier this month for monitoring have left the area. The fifth, who developed a heart problem Saturday and required CPR, has now been discharged from the hospital and will soon leave Omaha. The health care workers were exposed to Ebola in Sierra Leone when one of their colleagues became ill with the deadly virus. They were staying on the Nebraska Medical Center's campus while in quarantine. Ebola has a 21-day incubation period.

  • Bryant says he will sign public-hospital-transparency bill

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — Mississippi Gov. Phil Bryant said Tuesday that he intends to go to the Gulf Coast to sign a bill designed to bring more transparency to the way publicly owned hospitals are run. The bill was filed in response to pension losses at Singing River Hospital in Jackson County. Financial problems existed for months before coming to light, largely because the board of the county-owned hospital routinely met in private. "It breaks my heart to know that you find yourself in this situation," Bryant, a Republican, told more than three dozen of the hospital's retirees and their relatives who traveled to the state Capitol to push for Senate Bill 2407.

  • One-tenth of Central Valley's smog from Asia, scholars say

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    DAVIS, Calif. (AP) — Up to 10 percent of the smog in California's polluted San Joaquin Valley is coming from outside the state — much of it from 6,000 miles away, in Asia, researchers in California said Tuesday. Ian Faloona, an atmospheric scientist at the University of California at Davis, presented the findings at a conference of air quality experts and regulators near Yosemite National Park. Researchers with the California university spent three years gathering air samples from monitoring systems in a plane and near Point Sur on the California coast. Scientists said they were able to determine signature traits of pollutants from different areas, allowing them to determine their origin.

  • Fallin signs Oklahoma prescription drug database bill

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Doctors in Oklahoma will be required to check a prescription drug database before prescribing certain addictive drugs under a bill signed into law on Tuesday by Gov. Mary Fallin. After the Senate voted 35-10 for the bill, Fallin held a hastily called signing ceremony for the measure that has been a priority of hers for several years. It the first bill she has signed this legislative session, and it will take effect Nov. 1. "The goal of the bill is to stop doctor-shopping in the state of Oklahoma," Fallin said, referring to the practice of drug seekers going to multiple physicians to acquire prescription narcotics. "More Oklahomans die from prescription drug overdoses each year than they do from car wrec

  • Indiana lawmakers back 3-year ban on building nursing homes

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A three-year moratorium on construction of most new nursing homes around Indiana has been approved by state lawmakers. The state Senate voted 36-12 Tuesday to give final approval to the bill, sending it to Gov. Mike Pence. House members voted earlier this month by a narrow margin to support the proposal. Supporters say the moratorium is needed because Indiana has thousands of unused nursing home beds, which are costing the state millions in annual Medicaid costs based on a payment formula that includes construction costs. Those against the measure say it violates free-market principles and will cost jobs.

  • Lawsuit aims to stop Ohio from dropping people from Medicaid

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — An Ohio group wants a federal judge to block state officials from ending the Medicaid health coverage of tens of thousands of low-income residents. The request comes as the state's Medicaid agency works to "re-determine" eligibility for recipients of the federal-state program, as required by the federal government. The Legal Aid Society of Columbus filed a lawsuit Monday on behalf of three Medicaid recipients, claiming their benefits were put at risk after the state violated federal law and Medicaid regulations. The Community Refugee and Immigration Services, a nonprofit agency in central Ohio that helps refugees, also is a plaintiff.

  • VA Secretary to Montana veterans: We need to do more

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    HELENA, Mont. (AP) — The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs needs to do more to make sure Montana veterans get the health care they need in a timely fashion, VA Secretary Robert McDonald told veterans in Helena on Tuesday. "We recognize the importance of Montana, the second highest per capita of veteran population in the country," he said. McDonald said efforts are underway to hire health care providers in the state, a cardiology nurse was recently hired in Billings and several urologists for Billings and Helena. He said they're working to recruit and hire primary care doctors and those specializing in mental health, particularly in rural areas of the state. McDonald spoke and answered veterans' questions along with

  • Missouri House panel sends medical marijuana bill forward

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — The Missouri House may consider a medical marijuana law that has garnered some Republican support after a House committee unanimously approved the proposal Tuesday. The GOP-sponsored measure would set up a system for some Missouri residents with specific illnesses and a doctor's approval to obtain and use marijuana legally in the state. "It's quite clear from the unanimous support of the committee that it warrants a discussion that the entire body needs to have," said Columbia Rep. Caleb Jones, who chairs the House Select Committee on General Laws. Republican lawmakers in Missouri have been leery of loosening marijuana laws in the past, repeatedly expressing concerns about potential conseque

  • Gov. Mary Fallin signs prescription monitoring bill

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    Gov. Mary Fallin signed a bill Tuesday to require doctors to check a patient database before prescribing addictive drugs. House Bill 1948, the first piece of legislation she signed this year, will go into effect on Nov. 1. It is intended to help reduce drug addiction and overdose deaths by ensuring people don’t get multiple prescriptions from multiple doctors. The initial database check would be required with the first prescription for three classes of drugs. Subsequent checks would need to be made at least once every 180 days. Fallin predicted the bill would save lives, saying there are hundreds of people have fatal overdoses on prescription drugs yearly in Oklahoma. “I am very excited that it is our first bi

  • Florida senators meet with feds over health care money

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Amid growing budget discord that could derail this year's session of the Florida Legislature, Senate President Andy Gardiner dispatched two top Republican senators to Washington to talk with federal officials about more than $1 billion in health care grants the state could soon lose. Gardiner, an Orlando Republican who works for a hospital, took the unusual step even as top officials with the administration of Gov. Rick Scott are directly negotiating with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and the Obama administration. Tuesday's visit by Sens. Rene Garcia of Hialeah and Garrett Richter of Naples comes as the House and Senate are prepared to vote this week on sharply divergent budgets t

  • Lufthansa: Co-pilot disclosed earlier "severe depression"

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — Lufthansa knew that the co-pilot of the passenger plane that crashed in the French Alps last week had suffered from an episode of "severe depression" before he finished his flight training with the German airline. The airline said Tuesday that it has found emails that Andreas Lubitz sent to the Lufthansa flight school in 2009 when he resumed his training in Bremen after an interruption of several months. In them, he informed the school that he had suffered a "previous episode of severe depression," which had since subsided. The airline said Lubitz subsequently passed all medical checks and that it has provided the documents to prosecutors. It declined to make any further comment.

  • Hospitals ask Connecticut lawmakers to replenish budget cuts

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Leaders of state hospitals urged state lawmakers Tuesday to replenish the cuts in Democratic Gov. Dannel P. Malloy's proposed budget, predicting the suggested changes could lead to deep reductions in medical services and staff. They said Malloy's suggested budget plan is especially worrisome considering recent cuts in federal funding. "For us, the situation is quite bleak and troubling," said Kurt Barwis, president and CEO of Bristol Hospital. He said his 1,700-employee hospital has already undergone extensive cost-cutting measures and is still losing about $200,000 a month in revenue. If Malloy's state cuts take effect, Barwis predicted that the facility would close its doors in three to five years.

  • Sponsor withdraws Tennessee abortion ultrasound bill

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A bill that originally sought to require ultrasound images be shown or described to women seeking abortions in Tennessee has been withdrawn for the year. The House Health Subcommittee was poised Tuesday to send Rep. Rick Womick's bill to study committee after the Legislature adjourns for the year. But the Murfreesboro Republican instead persuaded the panel to reschedule the bill for the subcommittee's first meeting of 2016. Womick had proposed an amendment to give the patient the option to view the ultrasound before undergoing the procedure. Several committee members expressed concern about a 24-hour waiting period that could conflict with other legislation seeking to establish a 48-hour waiting peri

  • Colorado trying again to add maternal warnings at pot shops

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    DENVER (AP) — A second attempt by Colorado lawmakers to require pot shops to post warnings for pregnant customers is moving ahead in the state Legislature. A state House committee voted 10-3 to direct state health authorities to craft warnings to be posted in recreational and medical marijuana dispensaries. The warnings would tell pregnant women about "potential risks caused by marijuana." The bill is slightly weaker than a warning bill lawmakers rejected in February. That version would have banned pot shops from recommending pot to pregnant women. The new version just forbids advertising aimed at pregnant women.

  • Bill would create medical retirement fund for ex-boxers

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — Nevada lawmakers are reviewing a bill that would create a fund to help pay medical expenses for retired boxers. Democratic Assemblyman Harvey Munford is sponsoring AB313 and will testify on the bill Tuesday in the Assembly Taxation Committee. The bill would double ticket fees charged by the Nevada Athletic Commission and require half of the proceeds fund medical expenses for injuries sustained after a career of boxing. The state's athletic commission estimated that the bill would raise around $134,000 a year but said in a fiscal note that the cost of administering the program would leave little money left over for actual medical payments. Munford brought forward similar legislation in 20




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