• NCAA says concussion settlement good for athletes

    Yesterday

    CHICAGO (AP) — The NCAA is hailing a settlement in a class-action concussions suit that creates a $70 million fund to diagnose current and former college athletes for possible brain injuries. The sides announced a deal Tuesday in a filing in federal court in Chicago. They'd been negotiating for nearly a year. The NCAA's chief medical officer, Brian Hainline, calls the settlement provisions "proactive measures" that "will ensure student-athletes have access to high quality medical care." The Indianapolis-based NCAA also agrees to implement a single, return-to-play policy spelling out how all teams must treat players who receive head blows. The agreement stops short of setting aside a fixed amount of money to pay

  • Correction: Libya story

    Yesterday

    CAIRO (AP) — In a story July 27 about violence in Libya, The Associated Press erroneously reported a death toll figure released by the Libyan Health Ministry over fighting at Tripoli's international airport. The ministry said at least 97 people had been killed in the ongoing battle for the airport, not 79.

  • Md. schools get $10.7M grant to study STDs

    Yesterday

    BALTIMORE (AP) — The University of Maryland Schools of Dentistry and Medicine have received a $10.7 million grant over five years to study the causes, prevention and treatment of sexually-transmitted diseases. The schools announced the grant on Tuesday from the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases of the National Institutes of Health. The long-term goal of the research is to develop strategies to reduce the incidence of sexually transmitted infections and diseases worldwide, particularly chlamydia and gonorrhea.

  • NCAA concussion suit includes Arkansas plaintiffs

    Yesterday

    LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — Former college athletes in Arkansas are among the plaintiffs involved in a class-action lawsuit over head injuries. According to a federal court filing in Chicago, the NCAA agreed Tuesday to create a $70 million fund to test current and former college athletes for brain injuries. Players can use the results later as grounds for suing for damages. The NCAA also agreed to implement a policy spelling out how all teams must treat players who receive blows to the head. The settlement applies to multiple sports, including football, hockey, soccer, basketball, wrestling, field hockey and lacrosse. It covers both men and women.

  • Stories of athletes named in NCAA lawsuit

    Yesterday

    Ten head-injury lawsuits filed against the NCAA were consolidated into one federal class-action suit in Chicago, where a settlement was announced Tuesday. In all of the lawsuits combined, dozens of plaintiffs who said they suffered concussions playing contact sports in college are named. Here are some of their stories: Adrian Arrington, former Eastern Illinois football player Arrington, a strong safety at Eastern Illinois from 2006 to 2009, initiated the first lawsuit in 2011. Arrington says he suffered five concussions playing for EIU — some so severe that he couldn't recognize his parents later in the day.

  • Singing River Health System closing 2 more clinics

    Yesterday

    PASCAGOULA, Miss. (AP) — Singing River Health System says two primary care clinics in Gautier and D'Iberville will close Aug. 29. "Realigning the clinics is a tough decision that we feel will help make our organization stronger without compromising our quality of care," Dr. Randy Roth, SRHS interim chief medical officer, said in a news release Monday. "The actions we are taking, along with issues concerning reimbursement, are very prevalent industry-wide trends," he said. Roth said. "As a whole, SRHS has a lot of positives that we believe affirm our commitment to providing our community with world-class care." Officials said patients will be directed to existing clinics locations in Biloxi, Hurley, Pascagoula, O

  • St. Clair County OKs $7M medical marijuana plan

    Yesterday

    MARISSA, Ill. (AP) — A southwestern Illinois county has signed off on a planned $7-million medical marijuana venture near the town of Marissa. The Belleville News-Democrat (http://bit.ly/1nXHzIP ) reports that the St. Clair County board voted 21 to 4 on Monday in favor of the farm proposal, which still requires approval by state officials. Officials say the center would be called Nature's Care and would grow up to 15 strains of marijuana in a greenhouse attached to a 20,000-square-foot building. The marijuana would be sold in dried or edible form. And in northwestern Illinois, the Rock Island Argus (http://bit.

  • New Yorkers lag as potential organ donors

    Yesterday

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Far fewer New Yorkers have signed up as organ donors than Americans as a whole, prompting the state to seek help boosting enrollment and shortening its list of patients who die waiting. A study from Excellus Blue Cross Blue Shield showed 22 percent of New York adults in the donor registry, compared with 48 percent nationally. The study also said 539 New Yorkers died awaiting a transplant last year while others became too sick and ineligible. "There are too many New Yorkers losing their lives when they could and should be saved," said Aisha Taylor, executive director of the nonprofit New York Alliance for Donation. Currently, 8,667 people are on New York's list for a kidney and 1,352 for a liv

  • Despite good news, benefit programs face problems

    Yesterday

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Despite some good news, Medicare and Social Security still face long-term financial problems as millions of baby boomers reach retirement. Social Security's disability program is already in crisis as it edges toward the brink of insolvency. Getting relief from a slowdown in health care spending, Medicare's giant hospital trust fund won't be exhausted until 2030, the government said Monday. That's four years later than last year's estimate. As for Social Security, its massive retirement program will remain solvent until 2034. The disability trust fund, however, is slated to run dry in just two years. At that point, unless Congress acts, the program will collect only enough payroll taxes to pay 81 percent of

  • West Nile found in New Jersey mosquitoes

    Yesterday

    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — Twenty New Jersey residents have tested positive for a mosquito-borne virus that has spread through the Caribbean. The state Health Department says the residents who came down with chikungunya had returned to New Jersey from the Caribbean. Chikungunya causes a high fever and severe pain in the joints. It is rarely fatal. Meanwhile, the health department has found West Nile virus in mosquito pools in Atlantic, Bergen, Burlington, Camden, Gloucester, Hudson, Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Passaic and Union counties. West Nile symptoms include fever, muscle weakness, vomiting and dizziness. So far, no one has tested positive. Two of 12 residents who tested positive for West Nile last summer died

  • Ga. health officials seek public input on spending

    Yesterday

    ATLANTA (AP) — Georgia health officials are looking for public input on spending. The Georgia Department of Public Health and its Board of Public Health plan to hold a public budget hearing at 1 p.m. on Aug. 12 in an effort to gather public comments and strengthen community involvement. The hearing will allow member of the public to give their opinions on how the department should use its resources. Anyone interested in speaking at the meeting is asked to send their comments to the department by Aug. 5. Speakers will be limited to three minutes each. The meeting will be held as the agency begins to plan for the amended 2015 fiscal year budget and the 2016 general budget. ___ Online: dph.georgia.

  • Veterans crisis center coming to Clarksburg

    Yesterday

    CLARKSBURG, W.Va. (AP) — The long delays for veterans seeking medical care at VA hospitals have prompted The American Legion to plan a short-term crisis center in Clarksburg. The veterans' organization will open a "crisis command center" at the Louis A. Johnson VA Medical Center on Aug. 5 and 6. A town hall meeting is set for Aug. 4 at American Legion Post 31 in Shinnston. The organization made earlier stops in St. Louis, El Paso, Texas; Fayetteville, North Carolina; and Phoenix. A federal audit found that the average wait time at the Clarksburg VA Center is 54 for new patients seeking a primary care doctor, 86 days for a specialist and 96 days for mental health services.

  • New fears about Ebola spread after plane scare

    Updated: Mon, Jul 28, 2014

    DAKAR, Senegal (AP) — No one knows for sure just how many people Patrick Sawyer came into contact with the day he boarded a flight in Liberia, had a stopover in Ghana, changed planes in Togo, and then arrived in Nigeria, where authorities say he died days later from Ebola, one of the deadliest diseases known to man. Now health workers are scrambling to trace those who may have been exposed to Sawyer across West Africa, including flight attendants and fellow passengers. Health experts say it is unlikely he could have infected others with the virus that can cause victims to bleed from the eyes, mouth and ears.

  • Be ready for 'prolonged' Gaza war, Netanyahu says

    Updated: Mon, Jul 28, 2014

    GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) — Signaling an escalation of Israel's Gaza operation, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu told Israelis Monday to be ready for a "prolonged" war, and the military warned Palestinians in three large neighborhoods to leave their homes and head immediately for Gaza City. In central Gaza City early Tuesday, at least two major explosions hit a media complex housing the offices of Hamas-run Al Aqsa television and radio. The blasts shook surrounding buildings and started a fire on the roof of the office block, one of Gaza's tallest. AP video showed a massive flash as the first strike hit the top of the building, sending debris raining down. The building also houses offices of a number of Arab satellite tel

  • NC Senate leaders hint at budget details

    Updated: Mon, Jul 28, 2014

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina's Senate leader said Monday that he hopes to have a final budget to vote on this week. Phil Berger, R-Rockingham, said both chambers are working together to finalize the budget and he says he hopes the Senate will have a draft to consider by Thursday. Both he and House Speaker Thom Tillis, R-Mecklenburg, announced Saturday after a work session that there was an outline for a deal. The House and Senate have been caught in an impasse for weeks as they try to adjust spending in the second year of the two-year budget approved last summer. "The speaker and I were able to have some productive and frank discussions. I credit him and his willingness to meet with me and work on these things," Berg

  • Doctor who contracted Ebola in grave condition

    Updated: Mon, Jul 28, 2014

    FORT WORTH, Texas (AP) — Kent Brantly always wanted to be a medical missionary, and he took the work seriously, spending months treating a steady stream of patients with Ebola in Liberia. Now Brantly is himself a patient, fighting for his own survival in an isolation unit on the outskirts of Monrovia, Liberia, after contracting the deadly disease. The Texas-trained doctor says he is "terrified" of the disease progressing further, according to Dr. David Mcray, the director of maternal-child health at John Peter Smith Hospital in Fort Worth, where Brantly completed a four-year residency. "I'm praying fervently that God will help me survive this disease," Brantly said in an email Monday to Mcray.

  • Jury acquits man in Eastern Michigan player death

    Updated: Mon, Jul 28, 2014

    ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — A jury on Monday acquitted a man in the robbery-slaying of Eastern Michigan University football player Demarius Reed. The Washtenaw County Circuit Court jury reached the not guilty verdict in the trial of Ed Thomas, 21, one of two men charged in the slaying of the 20-year-old wide receiver from Chicago. The other man charged, Kristopher Pratt, 20, accepted a deal and pleaded guilty to second-degree murder, testifying that he shot Reed and Thomas participated in the Oct. 18 robbery. The jury acquitted Thomas on open murder, armed robber and conspiracy charges. "I'm surprised and disappointed," Ypsilanti police Lt. Thomas Eberts, one of the lead investigators of the killing, told The Ann Ar

  • Officials: Little risk of Ebola outbreak in US

    Updated: Mon, Jul 28, 2014

    NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. health officials are monitoring the Ebola outbreak in Africa but say the risk of the deadly germ spreading to the United States is remote. The Centers for Disease Control on Monday sent a health alert to U.S. doctors about the outbreak. There are no travel restrictions to the West Africa region hit by the disease. But last month, the CDC issued a mid-level travel advisory for health workers. Two American aid workers in Liberia have tested positive for the virus and are being treated there. The family of one worker — a doctor — recently returned to the U.S. for a visit. The CDC said they are fine. Officials stressed people are not contagious until they show symptoms, and the doctor's family lef

  • Idaho officials: Prison takeover had 'challenges'

    Updated: Mon, Jul 28, 2014

    BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Idaho prison officials say they had to have thousands of dollars' worth of medications shipped overnight to the state's largest prison after the former operator, Corrections Corporation of America, left the facility without a promised eight-day supply of inmate drugs. The Idaho Department of Correction officials also say they discovered some chronically ill inmates went without needed medical care, and some medical records were missing when they assumed control of the facility. But CCA officials say those claims are without merit and that no one from the department has contacted the Nashville, Tennessee-based company to communicate any concerns.

  • Liberians in Minnesota worry about Ebola outbreak

    Updated: Mon, Jul 28, 2014

    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Members of Minnesota's sizeable Liberian community say an Ebola outbreak that has killed hundreds of people in West Africa, including a local woman's husband, has them worrying about relatives and scrambling to raise money to help prevent the virus from spreading. Minnesota Department of Health officials met with West African community leaders Monday in Brooklyn Park to try to address concerns. "It is killing people like crazy," said Prudence McCabe, of Brooklyn Park. "Everyone is trying to call family members ... we are trying to send money right away. ... All we can do is pray and be helpful." There have been no confirmed cases of Ebola in the U.S.