• Christian Women's Job Corps hosts 9th annual style show

    Yesterday

    Ann Wiles, 2009 graduate of the Christian Women’s Job Corps, described her experience as a phoenix being raised from the ashes of her former life. “God rebuilt me from the ground up,” Wiles said. “I am flying so well today because of your CWJC support back then. Your support started it all.” Former CWJC Kerr County interns and members of the community gathered at the Y.O. Ranch Resort Hotel and Conference Center on Thursday for the ninth annual Leading Ladies Style Show and Luncheon. The organization works with women in the community who want to work toward self-sufficiency but need support and training. Many are single mothers or recovering from substance abuse.

  • Why the world’s biggest exporter of crude is trying to wean itself off oil

    Yesterday

    It would be hard to exaggerate the importance of oil in Saudi Arabia. So when an influential young prince started talking this year about selling shares in the state-owned oil company and weaning the economy off its dependence on petrodollars, many were skeptical both inside and outside the conservative kingdom. This week, the world got a closer look at what the ruling Saud family has in mind. In an interview with Saudi-owned broadcaster Al-Arabiya, Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman outlined a sweeping plan dubbed “Saudi Vision 2030.” It includes listing for sale less than 5 percent of the Saudi Arabian Oil Co., building the world’s biggest sovereign wealth fund, reducing government subsidies and developing sector

  • Death raises questions: Did Prince die of an overdose?

    Yesterday

    CHICAGO (AP) — Prince's final days and unexpected death at age 57 raise questions among experts familiar with prescription painkiller overdoses. It's possible the innovative musician's demise represents one of the most public tragedies in an overdose crisis now gripping America. A law enforcement official told The Associated Press on Thursday that investigators are looking into whether Prince died from an overdose and whether a doctor was prescribing him drugs in the weeks before he was found dead at his home in suburban Minneapolis. The law enforcement official has been briefed on the investigation and spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media.

  • Drug drop off boxes now at each state police barracks

    Yesterday

    HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — After a successful campaign placing prescription drug drop boxes across Connecticut yielded 23,000 pounds of unused pills last year, 11 more boxes have been added. State officials announced Thursday that the 11 additional boxes will be located at each Connecticut State Police barracks. The 60 drop boxes placed last year are located at municipal police departments throughout the state. Gov. Dannel Malloy said certain prescription drugs can lead youths toward heroin, and the state must "do all that we can" to combat the national and statewide opioid crisis. Officials say 415 people died from heroin-related overdoses in Connecticut last year.

  • Board to review 15 conditions for Illinois medical marijuana

    Yesterday

    SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Illinois patients who want to use medical marijuana legally will try again to expand the program to include chronic pain, diabetes, migraine and other health conditions. Monday's meeting of the state's Medical Cannabis Advisory Board could lead to new recommendations, but Gov. Bruce Rauner's administration has twice before rejected the board's suggestions. This time, the expert panel will discuss petitions submitted during January. Fifteen conditions are on the agenda. They include irritable bowel syndrome, post-traumatic stress disorder, Lyme disease, osteoarthritis, autism and chronic low-level depression. The expert panel has recommended many of the conditions before to no avail.

  • Board OKs reductions that will limit mental health care access

    Yesterday

    Thousands of low-income Oklahomans with mental illnesses and substance use disorders will have less access to the care they need, a result of cuts approved Thursday at a special state Medicaid board meeting. The Oklahoma Health Care Authority board approved cuts Thursday that limit how much therapy Medicaid members can receive. The board also approved provider rate cuts to behavioral health professionals. The cuts are the Oklahoma Department of Mental Health and Substance Abuse Services' attempt to balance the agency's budget amid the state budget crisis. As a result of the two state revenue failures, the agency has cut almost $23 million from its budget over the past few months.

  • NY educators to develop school curriculum on organ donation

    Yesterday

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York education officials say they're working with lawmakers and organizations that promote organ donation to develop a model curriculum that will be made available for free to school districts statewide in September. The Education Department says it will include exemplar lesson plans and best practice instructional resources on the importance and value of organ and tissue donation. Board of Regents Chancellor Betty Rosa says thousands of New Yorkers are waiting for donations. New Yorkers can register and indicate on drivers' licenses that they will donate their organs and tissue after they die to others for transplant. Regent James Cottrell, a physician, says education is the key to incre

  • 5 indicted in Phoenix for marijuana growing scheme

    Yesterday

    PHOENIX (AP) — Five people are accused of falsely gaining medical marijuana grower status to illegally sell cannabis in Phoenix. The Attorney General's Office says a state grand jury indicted the five men in Phoenix on Thursday. Perry Hester, Brandon Hester, James Donaldson, and Christopher Rafferty are charged with giving fraudulent information to to gain status as medical marijuana caregivers. A fifth, Christopher Martin, is charged with allegedly transporting money and marijuana for sale. It was not immediately known if they had attorneys. According to the indictment, the defendants are accused of giving false patient addresses in remote areas in the state. They then cultivated plans and sold them

  • Attorney general's office participating in Drug Take-Back

    Yesterday

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — West Virginia Attorney General Patrick Morrisey's office is participating in the National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day on Saturday with a dropoff site at the state Capitol. The attorney general's office is participating in coordination with Capitol Police. The event runs from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. near the East Rotunda on the California Street side of the Capitol. It is one of almost 120 collection locations in the state. Other locations can be found at http://www.deadiversion.usdoj.gov/drug_disposal/takeback/index.html . The event involves local and state law enforcement agencies collecting unused medication and properly disposing of it.

  • Residents of Iraq's IS-held Fallujah suffer under siege

    Yesterday

    BAGHDAD (AP) — Abu Jassim can only afford to provide one meal a day for his seven-member family — usually a stew made of locally grown leafy green vegetables or rice with a small portion of flat bread. "We are experiencing the agony of starvation for the first time in our life," said Abu Jassim, a 52-year-old grocer and resident of the besieged Islamic State-held city of Fallujah. In reality, nobody seems to be starving in Fallujah just yet. But medical officials say malnutrition is on the rise and vital medical supplies are running out. Since August, Iraqi government troops have tightened their grip around Fallujah — under IS control since the early days of 2014 — and have prevented the entry of food and medici

  • Quotations in the News

    Yesterday

    "The stigma that is associated with addiction could well have been what killed him. Maybe he was afraid to seek help. Maybe he sought help before and was treated in a disrespectful and unproductive way." -Addiction author Maia Szalavitz on whether Prince might have died from an opioid overdose. ___ "Maybe this is the way Kim Jong Un can protect his family, protect his people, protect his country. If I was in his position, sometimes I think I might do the same thing. Well, sometimes." -An exiled North Korean living in South Korea, on Kim Jung Un's nuclear missile tests. ___ "I have Democrat friends and Republican friends. I get along with almost everyone, but I have never worked with a more miserable son of a bitc

  • AstraZeneca says it will cut costs

    Yesterday

    LONDON (AP) — Anglo-Swedish drugmaker AstraZeneca says first-quarter earnings fell 12 percent as it announced plans to cut costs so it can devote more resources to cancer drugs. Core operating profit, which excludes one-time items such as restructuring costs and impairments, fell to $1.59 billion versus $1.81 billion in the first quarter of 2015. AstraZeneca said Friday that income increased to $646 million from $550 million AstraZeneca also says it plans to cuts costs by about $1.1 billion over the next two years as the company seeks to increase productivity. Chief Executive Pascal Soriot says the company is "driving greater efficiency across the organization to support the advancement of our strategy.

  • Sanofi profits stable, strong sales in emerging markets

    Yesterday

    PARIS (AP) — Sanofi says drugs sales in emerging markets helped keep its profits stable in the first quarter despite losses caused by Venezuela's collapsing currency. With early efforts for a Zika vaccine and several other drugs in the pipeline, Sanofi is trying to expand its cancer treatments with a $9.3-billion bid for San Francisco's Medivation Inc. CEO Olivier Brandicourt said Friday he hoped for a positive response to the unsolicited bid for the maker of Xtandi. Sanofi reported 1.11 billion euros in net profit for the first quarter, slightly up from 1.05 billion euros in the same period of 2015 but below analyst forecasts. Sales fell to 8.54 billion euros from 8.8 billion euros last year.

  • Graduating nursing students to take part in disaster drill

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    NASHUA, N.H. (AP) — Graduating nursing students and faculty are going to be taking part in a mock disaster event at Rivier University in Nashua. The purpose of the exercise is to better prepare graduates for future employers and so that they can respond quickly in the event of a community disaster. The event is taking place from 4 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Friday in the parking lot next to Sylvia Trottier Hall on campus.

  • UK company fined for misleading Australians over painkillers

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    SYDNEY (AP) — An Australian court ordered a British consumer goods company on Friday to pay 1.7 million Australian dollars ($1.3 million) in penalties after ruling that the company misled consumers about the effectiveness of a popular painkiller. The Federal Court ruled in December that British consumer goods company Reckitt Benckiser deceived Australians by selling Nurofen painkillers that were marketed to relieve specific ailments, such as back pain and period pain, when all of the products contained an identical amount of the same active ingredient, ibuprofen lysine. The court ordered the company to remove the products from Australian stores.

  • The Latest: 5 Ohio State players selected in 1st round

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    CHICAGO (AP) — The Latest on the first day of the NFL draft (all times local): 11:50 p.m. Ohio State had five players selected in the first round of the NFL draft, one shy of the record held by Miami. Here's the list of colleges with five players-or-more drafted in first round since 2000: 2004: Miami (6) — Sean Taylor (Washington); Kellen Winslow (Cleveland); Jonathan Vilma (N.Y. Jets); D.J. Williams (Denver); Vernon Carey (Miami); Vince Wilfork (New England. 2002: Miami (5) — Bryant McKinnie (Minnesota); Jeremy Shockey (N.Y. Giants); Phillip Buchanon (Oakland); Ed Reed (Baltimore); Mike Rumph (San Francisco. 2006: Ohio State (5) — A.J.

  • House approves split of settlement money from BP oil spill

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — The Alabama House of Representatives on Thursday approved a compromise plan for doling out settlement money from the 2010 oil spill — one that could help stave off cuts in Medicaid this fall. The House-passed bill was a last-minute deal between lawmakers who said the wisest thing to do with the $1 billion settlement was to pay off state debts and lawmakers from coastal counties who argued more money should go to areas that took the brunt of the damage from largest oil spill in US history. Representatives voted 82-12 for the legislation that would use settlement money — after getting it through an upfront payment — for both debt repayment and coastal road projects.

  • DEA to collect unwanted prescription drugs on Saturday

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana residents who have prescription drugs they no longer want or need can get rid of them on Saturday. The Drug Enforcement Administration has posted a list of locations where Indiana residents can get rid of their unwanted drugs at http://1.usa.gov/24ndUwf . All members of the public are invited to anonymously drop off any unneeded medications for safe disposal from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday. The DEA cannot accept liquids or needles or sharps, only pills or patches. The service is free and anonymous, no questions asked. All but four of Indiana's 92 counties now have permanent prescription drug take-back sites. For a list of permanent prescription drug take-back locations, visit www.BitterPill

  • APNewsBreak: Investigators look at overdose in Prince death

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — Investigators are looking into whether Prince died from an overdose and whether a doctor was prescribing him drugs in the weeks before he was found dead at his home in suburban Minneapolis, a law enforcement official told The Associated Press on Thursday. The official said that among the things investigators are looking at is whether a doctor was with Prince on a plane that made an emergency landing in Illinois less than a week before the star died. The law enforcement official has been briefed on the investigation and spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media. The official said investigators are also looking into what kind of drugs were on the pla

  • Death raises questions: Did Prince die of an overdose?

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    CHICAGO (AP) — Prince's final days and unexpected death at age 57 raise questions among experts familiar with prescription painkiller overdoses. It's possible the innovative musician's demise represents one of the most public tragedies in an overdose crisis now gripping America. A law enforcement official told The Associated Press on Thursday that investigators are looking into whether Prince died from an overdose and whether a doctor was prescribing him drugs in the weeks before he was found dead at his home in suburban Minneapolis. The law enforcement official has been briefed on the investigation and spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because he was not authorized to speak to the media.




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