• Medical marijuana grower gives up 1 of 3 Illinois licenses

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    CHICAGO (AP) — A medical marijuana grower is giving up at least one of three Illinois permits after missing a deadline to pay state fees and submit proof of a surety bond. The Chicago Tribune reports that (http://trib.in/1DZFsMq ) Green Thumb Industries LLC missed Wednesday's deadline to pay a $200,000 fee and secure a $2 million surety bond or escrow account for each permit. An Illinois Department of Agriculture spokeswoman confirmed the missed deadline and said GTI informed the state it will not move forward with a permit for a cultivation center near the northwestern Illinois city of Dixon. GTI had an option to buy land in that area. But the president of Lee County Development Association says the contract has been

  • Commuter with measles also dined at Bay Area restaurant

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    BERKELEY, Calif. (AP) — Officials say the commuter who may have exposed at least 1,500 Bay Area Rapid Transit riders to measles also ate at a popular Northern California restaurant. BART warned commuters for a second time this month about possible exposure. San Mateo County health officer Scott Morrow says the infected resident traveled from the Millbrae station to the Civic Center Station between 4:30 and 5 p.m. Feb 20. Berkeley health officer Janet Berreman tells the Contra Costa Times (http://bayareane.ws/1LRxzv1 ) that the infected person also went to La Mediterranee in Berkeley from 6:45 to 8 p.m. Feb. 20. Hundreds of diners and workers could have been exposed. Health officials say the risk is low and almost negl

  • 3 new measles cases confirmed in Clark County

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Health officials have confirmed three new measles cases in Clark County, bringing to nine the number of confirmed cases there since the start of the year. The Southern Nevada Heath District said Friday the new cases involve two employees and a patron at Emeril's New Orleans Fish House at the MGM Grand Hotel & Casino in Las Vegas. The three are adults under the age of 55. Health district officials say one of the workers was potentially contagious while working shifts beginning at 4 p.m. over a four-day period ending Saturday, and anyone who was at the restaurant at those times should contact their doctor if they're not immunized against measles.

  • Bid to block health exchange in Tennessee seen as 'overkill'

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Some Republican lawmakers still reveling in the recent defeat of a proposal to expand Medicaid to 280,000 low-income Tennesseans are now setting their sights on 230,000 people enrolled through the federal health insurance exchange. State Sen. Brian Kelsey's latest proposal would ban Tennessee from creating a state-run exchange should the Supreme Court rule that the federal government can't pay subsidies in states that declined to set up their own insurance markets. Oral arguments in that case are scheduled for March 4. Tennessee is among the 30 states, largely led by Republicans, that declined to set up state-based systems and have exchanges run by the federal government instead.

  • Losing weight, gaining perspective in the memoir "It Was Me All Along"

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    Head here instead in headline field When “Titanic” came out in 1997, Andie Mitchell and her mom saw the now-classic film more than 20 times. Aside from her burgeoning teenage crush on Leonardo DiCaprio, Mitchell couldn’t understand what compelled them to pay for tickets twice in one day when they could barely afford groceries. “Mom was a grown woman, after all, and a world-weary one at that,” Mitchell writes in her memoir, “It Was Me All Along.” “She wasn’t the kind to fawn over a movie so severely.… I couldn’t, she couldn’t, articulate what brought us back to see it, time after time.” A decade later, they put their “Titanic” mania in perspective.

  • UN says limit use of personal audio players to 1 hour a day

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    BERLIN (AP) — People who use personal audio players should consider limiting their use to one hour a day and turn down the volume to prevent permanent hearing loss, the World Health Organization said Friday. The U.N. agency said young people are particularly at risk. with data from middle- and high-income countries showing that almost half of all 12- to 35-year-olds listen to their personal audio devices or cellphones at unsafe volumes. About 40 percent of young people are also exposed to damaging sound levels at nightclubs, bars and sporting events. "As the intensity of sound increases, the permissible time for safe exposure reduces," said Dr. Shelly Chadha, a WHO expert on hearing loss.

  • CEO: Nonprofit hopes to continue New Mexico operations

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    SANTE FE, N.M. (AP) — An Arizona nonprofit says it will submit a 90-day notice to cease providing mental health services in southern New Mexico but is willing to continue those operations under certain conditions. Dan Ranieri of Tucson-based La Frontera told The Associated Press Friday its New Mexico division is losing money on its Medicaid contracts but hopes to maintain its New Mexico operations if changes can be worked out. Ranieri said those changes would be in billings and reimbursements but he said La Frontera is not necessarily asking for more money. The Santa Fe New Mexican (http://goo.

  • Experts blame anti-vaccine lobby for Bosnia measles outbreak

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — Medical experts warned Friday the anti-vaccination lobby is growing in Bosnia, using scientifically discredited arguments to stoke parental fears in the worst-affected country in Europe's measles outbreak. This trend — combined with a generation that could not be immunized because of lack of vaccines during Bosnia's 1992-95 war — has led to 5,340 measles cases in Bosnia, according to the World Health Organization. "I am increasingly hearing from parents about their fears due to the stuff they read on the Internet," Dr. Gordana Banduka, a pediatrician from Pale, near Sarajevo, told The Associated Press.

  • Utah State creates hotline to help grieving pet owners

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    LOGAN, Utah (AP) — As a first-year veterinary science student at Utah State University, it's not surprising that one of Erin Hughes' best friends is a black Labrador named Charly. "I got her as a puppy in high school," Hughes said. "She has been one of my most loyal companions for the last six years of my life." Hughes is now one of five students who are helping staff a pet loss hotline. Between 5 p.m. and 7 p.m. Monday through Thursday, one of them will answer calls from pet owners who are mourning. "It's kind of a taboo. Losing a pet isn't the same as losing a family member," Hughes said. "People don't know how to treat it, and how to treat people that are grieving for it.

  • Ex-hospice executive indicted in multimillion-dollar fraud

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    PITTSBURGH (AP) — The former head of a Pittsburgh-area hospice used patients who weren't terminally ill to collect millions of dollars in false Medicare and Medicaid billings, according to a federal indictment. Former Horizons Hospice chief operating officer Mary Ann Stewart, 47, was indicted in Pittsburgh on one count of health care fraud and four counts of lying to a federal grand jury. The indictment contends the alleged fraud cost the government unspecified millions of dollars from January 2008 through August 2012 at the facility in Monroeville, about 15 miles east of Pittsburgh. The indictment alleges she conspired with unnamed "others known to the grand jury," but federal prosecutors aren't saying whether anyone else

  • Whatcom man is 7th person in Washington with measles

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    SEATTLE (AP) — State health officials say a Whatcom County man is the seventh person in Washington state to get the measles this year. Health Department spokesman Donn Moyer says the man was exposed while visiting a contagious relative in California. They do not know if his relative's illness was related to the Disneyland measles outbreak that began in December. He was not exposed to the other Washington cases. Six other people in the state have contracted measles this year: four people in Clallam County and two in Grays Harbor County. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report more than 150 people across the United States have gotten measles this year. Three-quarters of those cases are related to the Disne

  • Amsterdam warns tourists white heroin being sold as cocaine

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    AMSTERDAM (AP) — Authorities in Amsterdam warned Friday that potentially lethal white heroin is being sold as cocaine in the city after three Danish tourists became ill this week. Three people died and 17 became seriously ill with breathing problems late last year after inhaling heroin in Amsterdam, a city whose reputation as a center of free-wheeling drug culture draws tourists from around the world. City officials said a major public awareness campaign linked to those earlier cases will be resumed. The campaign, which targets tourists, involves large signs around the city warning in flashing lights that "Extremely dangerous cocaine is sold to tourists" in the area, as well as posters and flyers in bars, pot-selling

  • UN plans decision in August on mass Ebola vaccine program

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    BERLIN (AP) — The World Health Organization says a decision will be made in August whether to recommend a program of mass vaccination against Ebola in affected countries. The U.N. health agency says an independent expert group will weigh the results of ongoing clinical trials, the state of the epidemic and the logistical challenges of carrying out such a program. At the moment, two Ebola vaccines are being tested, but it's unknown how effective they are or what dose might be needed to protect people against the deadly virus. WHO spokesman Christian Lindmeier said Friday a final decision about whether to conduct widespread immunization would be taken by the ministers of the countries involved.

  • Nebraska nurse practitioner bill wins legislative approval

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — Nebraska lawmakers have approved a bill designed to give nurse practitioners more independence. Senators voted 46-0 Friday to pass the bill, which was vetoed last year by then-Gov. Dave Heineman. Last year's session ended before lawmakers had a chance to attempt an override. The bill by Sen. Sue Crawford of Bellevue would remove a requirement that nurse practitioners get a written agreement to consult with a doctor before they can practice. The so-called integrated practice agreements are designed to ensure that a physician is available for collaboration or referral if a patient doesn't respond to treatment. Supporters of the bill say the agreements make it harder to recruit well-trained nurses an

  • Scale of racism in Cup host Russia a threat, report says

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    LONDON (AP) — Russian football is plagued by a racist and far-right extremist fan culture that threatens the safety of visitors to the 2018 World Cup, according to a report provided to The Associated Press. Researchers from the Moscow-based SOVA Center and the Fare network, which helps to prosecute racism cases for European football's governing body UEFA, highlighted more than 200 cases of discriminatory behavior linked to Russian football over two seasons. "It shows a really quite gruesome picture of a domestic league which is full of aspects of racism, xenophobia: The far-right play a significant role in the fan culture," Fare executive director Piara Powar said in an interview with the Associated Press.

  • Oklahoma education board OKs sugary snack sales in schools

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — Students can continue to sell unhealthy snacks at school fundraisers, the Oklahoma Board of Education has decided. Board members on Thursday granted schools the ability to set local exemptions to the federal Health, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 that limits the sale of foods high in sugar or salt at schools. The Oklahoman reports (http://bit.ly/1zlHvV4 ) the board previously agreed to allow each district 30 fundraiser exemptions per school site per semester for a period of 14 days each. Board members said the regulation rollback lets local communities decide their health needs. "This is truly an area that should be controlled at the local level," said board member Lee Baxter.

  • Study: Smokers may tap into multiple sources for nicotine

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The first peek at a major study of how Americans smoke suggests many use combinations of products, and often e-cigarettes are part of the mix. It's a preliminary finding, but it highlights some key questions as health officials assess electronic cigarettes. "Are e-cigarettes a step toward a cigarette smoker getting off of cigarettes? Or are e-cigarettes a crutch so they can get nicotine in places and times when they wouldn't normally be allowed to smoke cigarettes?" asked Dr. Andrew Hyland of the Roswell Park Cancer Institute, the primary investigator for a huge government study of trends in smoking and tobacco use.

  • Fort Worth Star-Telegram Gil LeBreton column

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    The photo on the magazine cover still resonates. Sports Illustrated, June 2, 2008. The picture didn’t even show the best player in baseball’s face. Only the sweeping follow-through of his powerful swing. The headline, however, identified him perfectly: The Unbelievable Josh Hamilton. He had come from the depths of drug and alcohol addiction to baseball stardom with the Texas Rangers. From spending nights smoking crack cocaine in tattoo parlors to giving his born-again testimony in Sunday churches. The story, indeed, seemed too good to be true, just as the headline coyly implied.

  • Nursing home submits safety plans after woman wanders, dies

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    SAGAMORE HILLS, Ohio (AP) — A northeastern Ohio assisted living facility where a 94-year-old woman wandered outside and died of hypothermia has submitted a plan to state regulators to address problems that investigators said contributed to the woman's death. The body of Martha Jendrix was found January 19 by a snow plow driver outside Elmcroft of Sagamore Hills, about 20 miles south of Cleveland. Police said Jendrix wandered outside and collapsed. A coroner later ruled she died of hypothermia caused by exposure to the cold. The facility's plan includes a new door alert system, reassessment of patients' risk of wandering, retraining on missing patient procedure and informal rounds by management.

  • Trooper recovering from injuries suffered in collision

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    SARANAC LAKE, N.Y. (AP) — State police say a trooper is recovering from injuries suffered when his patrol vehicle was involved in an on-duty crash on an Adirondack road. The agency tells local media that 36-year-old Trooper Keith Brown was en route to an emergency call around 9:30 a.m. Wednesday when he attempted to pass a vehicle traveling in the same direction on state Route 86 in the village of Saranac Lake. Troopers say the driver of the other vehicle made a left turn to enter a private driveway and hit Brown's marked patrol car, which had its sirens and lights on. Brown's car was pushed off the road and into a parked, unoccupied truck. Brown was taken to Adirondack Medical Center in Saranac Lake, where he was tre




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