• Police: Omaha man arrested after hitting cyclist

    Updated: Wed, Aug 20, 2014

    OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — Omaha police have arrested a driver after they say he seriously injured a bicyclist and left the scene. Sgt. Joe Collins says police arrested the man Tuesday afternoon following a brief search. It's unclear if he has been charged. He says 45-year-old General Swayzer suffered broken vertebrae in his neck, several lacerations to his scalp and possibly paralysis. He was taken to the University of Nebraska Medical Center. His condition is unclear but Collins says he is expected to survive the injuries.

  • Aniston, Hamm, Hudson set to Stand Up to Cancer

    Updated: Wed, Aug 20, 2014

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Jennifer Aniston, Jon Hamm, Halle Berry, Reese Witherspoon and Kiefer Sutherland want to connect with you about cancer. They are among the stars slated to appear on "Stand Up to Cancer," the hour-long telethon set to air Sept. 5 on 31 broadcast and cable networks simultaneously. Other celebrity participants announced Wednesday include Pierce Brosnan, Rob Lowe, Will Ferrell and Ben Stiller. The broadcast will also feature performances by Jennifer Hudson, Ariana Grande, The Who, Common & Lupe Fiasco and Dave Matthews. Funds raised by "Stand Up to Cancer" support international scientific research aimed at discovering new treatments for various types of cancer. Since its first telethon in 2008, "Stand U

  • Panel eyes dry needling by physical therapists

    Updated: Wed, Aug 20, 2014

    NEWARK, Del. (AP) — A state regulatory board is set to begin the process of developing rules and regulations for the practice known as "dry needling." The Examining Board of Physical Therapists and Athletic Trainers, which meets Wednesday in Newark, has been charged with developing regulations to add dry needling to the definition of the practice of physical therapy. Dry needling involves using hollow needles to stimulate muscle fibers. Some say it differs from acupuncture because it is based on modern medical science instead of ancient theories and traditional Chinese medicine. But some acupuncturists disagree, saying dry needling is identical to acupuncture and that physical therapists should not be allowed to

  • Feds look at La dentists for kids on Medicaid

    Updated: Wed, Aug 20, 2014

    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — A federal study says 5 percent of Louisiana dentists treating children under Medicaid may be padding their numbers, overcharging, providing unnecessary treatments or even harming children. Health and Human Services Department auditors checked 512 dentists. They say 26 of them had questionable billings. The department inspector general's office looked at dentists who billed the program for at least 50 children in 2012. It says 26 billed for extremely high numbers of children or amounts of money, or showed other possible excesses. State health department official Calder Lynch says he thinks many of those dentists are among more than 20 the department is already investigating.

  • Former congressman to keynote at symposium

    Updated: Wed, Aug 20, 2014

    TULSA, Okla. (AP) — Former Rhode Island congressman Patrick Kennedy is scheduled to deliver the keynote address at the 20th annual Zarrow Mental Health Symposium celebration. The Sept. 18 dinner will be at the Cox Business Center in downtown Tulsa. Kennedy has been an advocate for those affected by depression and bipolar disorder. The former lawmaker authored the Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act of 2008 —requiring health insurance plans to provide equal coverage for mental illness. The dinner will honor Maxine Zarrow and her late husband, Jack Zarrow. Two decades ago, the couple planned the first symposium to highlight advanced research, the need for better mental health treatment and more comprehensive

  • Doctor plans jogging clinic in Eastern Panhandle

    Updated: Wed, Aug 20, 2014

    MARTINSBURG, W.Va. (AP) — Joggers of all types will have the chance to learn more about conditioning and training at a clinic in the Eastern Panhandle. Dr. Mark Cucuzzella is offering a clinic on strength training Sept. 5 at the Berkeley Medical Center's Wellness Center in Martinsburg. Cucuzzella is a veteran distance runner who has organized events in the Eastern Panhandle. He conducts monthly running clinics to promote proper form, injury prevention and improved performance. The clinic is free and open to the public, although registration is required. To register, call (304) 264-1287, ext. 31814.

  • Tuesday's primary sets up Mead-Gosar contest

    Updated: Wed, Aug 20, 2014

    CHEYENNE, Wyo. (AP) — Gov. Matt Mead's victory in Tuesday's Republican primary set the stage for a general election against Pete Gosar, a scrappy Democrat who says he's prepared to match his hustle and drive against the incumbent's advantages in voter registration and funding. Mead said he won the Republican primary over Dr. Taylor Haynes and Superintendent of Public Instruction Cindy Hill by focusing on his record and refusing to engage in negative campaigning. He also said he looked forward to the race against Gosar, noting he had appointed Gosar to state board of education. "We're certainly eager to discuss some of the issues he's been discussing, from the Affordable Care Act and Medicaid expansion and education," Mead s

  • Peanut, almond butter recalled for salmonella risk

    Updated: Tue, Aug 19, 2014

    NEW YORK (AP) — A unit of Hain Celestial Group Inc. is recalling some peanut and almond butter because of possible salmonella contamination. The company said Tuesday that there have been reports of four illnesses that may be related to the nut butters. They were sold under the brand names Arrowhead Mills peanut butters and MaraNatha almond butters and peanut butters. Also being recalled were some lots of private label almond butter from Whole Foods, Trader Joe's Kroger and Safeway. A total of 45 production lots are affected. They were sold in Canada, the Dominican Republic, Hong Kong and the United Arab Emirates as well as the U.S. The Lake Success, New York, company said it learned of the contamination risk after rou

  • NHL concussion lawsuits consolidated in Minnesota

    Updated: Tue, Aug 19, 2014

    ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Three lawsuits filed by retired NHL players over concussion-related injuries have been consolidated and will be heard by a federal judge in Minnesota. A special panel assigned the cases Tuesday to U.S. District Judge Susan Richard Nelson of St. Paul. The order says Minnesota provides a central location for parties and witnesses, including those from Canada. It consolidates lawsuits filed by more than 200 former players in Minnesota, New York and Washington. It notes that Nelson is already presiding over one of the cases. The order says two similar cases pending in Minnesota and New York may be added later. The lawsuits are similar to those on behalf of ex-NFL players, which resulted in an $870 m

  • Hawaii veterans talk doctor shortages in panel

    Updated: Tue, Aug 19, 2014

    HONOLULU (AP) — Veterans told U.S. Sen. Mazie Hirono they face a shortage of doctors on Maui, Molokai and the Big Island, which has contributed to the long wait times they endured seeking medical treatment across the isolated island chain. Vietnam veteran Victor Craft called the Veterans Affairs problems a "train wreck in slow motion" at a Tuesday hearing on Oahu hosted by Hirono for the U.S. Senate Committee on Veterans' Affairs. "There are those who say it will take a generation to fix the problems at VA, and that is unacceptable," Craft said. Capt. Elisa Smithers of the Hawaii Army National Guard said she was denied treatment for post-traumatic stress disorder and told that because she was a woman, what she saw in

  • Liberia president declares Ebola curfew

    Updated: Tue, Aug 19, 2014

    MONROVIA, Liberia (AP) — Liberia's president has declared a curfew and is imposing a quarantine of a major slum in the capital Monrovia as the death toll mounts from Ebola. President Ellen Johnson Sirleaf announced late Tuesday that movements now would be restricted between 9 p.m. and 6 a.m. The country is already under a state of emergency, and the latest action also will block all movement in and out of West Point, home to at least 50,000 people. Over the weekend, residents angered over the placement of an Ebola center in West Point looted the facility and 37 patients left who were supposed to be under surveillance. Health officials said that all of those later returned.

  • Liberia's president declares curfew, quarantine of large slum amid mounting Ebola death toll

    Updated: Tue, Aug 19, 2014

    MONROVIA, Liberia (AP) — Liberia's president declares curfew, quarantine of large slum amid mounting Ebola death toll.

  • FDA approves new drug for rare genetic disease

    Updated: Tue, Aug 19, 2014

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved a new capsule-based drug to treat Gaucher's disease. Regulators approved the new drug, Cerdelga, for patients with the Type 1 form of the rare genetic disorder, which causes excess fat to build up in the spleen, liver and bone marrow. Cerdelga is from Genzyme, the specialty drugmaker that introduced the first drug for Gaucher's disease 20 years ago. The oral treatment could serve as an alternative to Genzyme's best-selling drug Cerezyme, which is given intravenously. Cerezyme had sales of $935 million last year. The drug costs $300,000 for a year's supply, on average. Genzyme says it will soon release pricing for its new drug.

  • UN Ebola coordinator to visit West Africa

    Updated: Tue, Aug 19, 2014

    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The public health expert coordinating U.N. efforts to fight Ebola said on Tuesday that he's heading to Washington and then to West Africa to determine the best ways the world body can support people, communities and governments affected by the deadly disease. David Nabarro told a news conference that he will have "intensive interactions" on Wednesday with the World Bank, experts from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and others before flying to Dakar, Senegal on Wednesday night. Nabarro, who was appointed a week ago, said he will then travel to the four countries affected by the current Ebola outbreak — Liberia, Sierra Leone, Guinea and Nigeria.

  • Mobile County teen being treated for malaria

    Updated: Tue, Aug 19, 2014

    MOBILE, Ala. (AP) — Mobile County health officials say a teenage girl who recently returned from Africa is being treated for malaria. Mobile County Health Officer Dr. Bernard Eichold says the teen was in Uganda when she contracted the mosquito-borne illness and has been hospitalized since Monday. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, malaria can cause flu-like symptoms that can be fatal if left untreated. Malaria is not a contagious disease. According to the CDC's website, about 1,500 cases of malaria are diagnosed in the United States annually and those who have been infected have usually traveled from sub-Saharan Africa and south Asia.

  • ICE resumes deportations from New Mexico center

    Updated: Tue, Aug 19, 2014

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Federal authorities said this week that they resumed deporting immigrants housed at a temporary New Mexico center after a quarantine stemming from a few cases of chickenpox was lifted. U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement said in a statement late Monday that the agency resumed removal flights back to Central America on Aug. 7. Since then, 71 immigrant adults and children from the center have been deported, officials said. "ICE Health Service Corp. personnel have been clearing residents who have immunity to chicken pox, such as those who have already had the disease, or have been fully immunized through vaccination," the statement said.

  • Report: Stun guns misused by Nebraska officers

    Updated: Tue, Aug 19, 2014

    LINCOLN, Neb. (AP) — Nebraska law enforcement officers have used stun guns several times in recent years on suspects that included an elderly man, a mentally ill woman and a teenager, a civil liberties group said Tuesday. The report by the ACLU of Nebraska criticizes officers for using the weapon against vulnerable people, who could suffer extreme physical and mental health problems as a result of the shock. The report — "Dangerously Out of Bounds" — faults the departments for a lack of consistent training and reporting requirements, and for not adopting the U.S. Justice Department's recommendations for using the device.

  • Indiana wants ban on abortion pill law lifted

    Updated: Tue, Aug 19, 2014

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — An Indiana law that would require Planned Parenthood to stop performing drug-induced abortions at a Lafayette clinic or make significant upgrades to the facility wouldn't block women's access to the procedure, attorneys for the state contend. The Indiana attorney general's office filed a brief late Monday supporting its request for summary judgment in the case. Both the state and the American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana asked U.S. District Judge Jane Magnus-Stinson to rule in their favor after she issued a preliminary injunction in November blocking the 2013 law from taking effect.

  • Audit: 'Obamacare' tax not meeting revenue target

    Updated: Tue, Aug 19, 2014

    WASHINGTON (AP) — An "Obamacare" tax on medical devices is falling short of its revenue target because thousands of companies aren't paying it, according to a government audit released Tuesday. The audit by the Treasury inspector general for tax administration says the IRS needs to do a better job policing the tax. The tax agency, however, doesn't have adequate tools to identify which companies owe it, the audit said. The report could add fuel to efforts to repeal the tax, which is opposed by Republicans and many Democrats. While the IRS has taken steps to educate companies about the tax, the agency "faces challenges to definitively identify manufacturers subject to the medical device excise tax reporting and payment

  • AP Interview: Ryan discusses father's alcoholism

    Updated: Tue, Aug 19, 2014

    WASHINGTON (AP) — At age 15, Paul Ryan was already feeling isolated from his father, who had grown distant from his family and leaned heavily on whiskey. Then one morning the future congressman found his alcoholic father in bed, dead from an apparent heart attack at age 55. It's a formative story the Republicans' 2012 vice presidential nominee has not fully told publicly before now. In an interview with The Associated Press, Ryan said the event shaped him as a politician and as a family man — and figures heavily into whether he will seek the presidency in 2016. "Having not had a dad for a long time, it brings you much closer to your kids and your family," Ryan said from New York as he begins a tour to promote his new book