• Kansas City Royals hit by chickenpox

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    KANSAS CITY, Mo. (AP) — All-Star reliever Kelvin Herrera and Royals right fielder Alex Rios have been diagnosed with chickenpox, raising concerns that others on the AL Central leaders may have been exposed. Team officials said Tuesday that Herrera and Rios likely will miss a couple weeks after both were sent home from Tampa Bay over the weekend. The bigger concern is whether other players could come down with the highly contagious disease, and whether it might affect the postseason. "Think there is always a concern because these guys were in for three or four days before they showed signs of it," manager Ned Yost said before starting a series against Detroit on Tuesday night. "Since that point, (trainer) Nick Kenney has don

  • California lawmakers advance aid-in-dying bill on second try

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California lawmakers approved legislation Tuesday that would allow terminally ill patients to take life-ending medications, after an effort to pass a similar right-to-die bill stalled in the Legislature. The Assembly Public Health and Developmental Services Committee heard from some of the same advocates and opponents before approving the new bill, ABX2-15, on a 10-2 vote Tuesday, sending it to another committee. "I want the choice to be in my own bed with my daughter holding my hand while I pass peacefully. I do not want her sitting vigil by my bed for days or weeks," testified Christy O'Donnell, 47, who is suffering from terminal lung cancer that has metastasized to her brain, liver, spine and ri

  • Man who got life for marijuana charge goes free in Missouri

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — A man sentenced to life without parole on a marijuana-related charge was freed Tuesday from a Missouri prison after being behind bars for more than two decades — a period in which the nation's attitudes toward pot steadily softened. Family, friends, supporters and reporters flocked to meet Jeff Mizanskey as he stepped out of the Jefferson City Correctional Center into a sunny morning, wearing a new pair of white tennis shoes and a shirt that read "I'm Jeff & I'm free." "I spent a third of my life in prison," said Mizanskey, now 62, who was greeted by his infant great-granddaughter. "It's a shame.

  • FDA issues warning letters to powdered caffeine distributors

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration has issued warning letters to five distributors of pure powdered caffeine, saying the products put consumers at risk. The letters, which are dated Aug. 27, follow the overdose deaths last year of two young men from Ohio and Georgia. Caffeine powder is usually marketed as a dietary supplement and is unregulated, unlike caffeine added to soda. Since the FDA doesn't have the legal authority to pull such a substance off the shelves, the agency has been building a case against those who are marketing it in bulk in an attempt to persuade them to stop. Last summer, the FDA warned consumers to avoid pure powdered caffeine.

  • Wolf administration wraps up overhaul of Medicaid benefits

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    HARRISBURG, Pa. (AP) — The Wolf administration said Tuesday that it had completed the transfer of more than 1 million adult Medicaid enrollees into a single, new benefits package it had created as the program expands to record numbers under the 2010 federal health care law. The process that the Human Services Department finished included the dismantling of changes that Gov. Tom Wolf's predecessor had sought to make to Medicaid coverage as part of Pennsylvania's embrace of the Medicaid expansion. As of June 30, there were almost 2.6 million children and adults enrolled in Medicaid in Pennsylvania. Enrollees now include more than 400,000 who joined under the broader income eligibility guidelines that took effect Jan. 1 under

  • Rio head vows to introduce viral testing in Olympic waters

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    LONDON (AP) — Olympic organizers promised Tuesday to introduce viral testing in the polluted waters in Rio de Janeiro where about 1,400 athletes will compete in next year's games. The IOC and Brazilian organizers had repeatedly insisted that only bacterial testing was required despite an independent five-month analysis by The Associated Press showing dangerously high levels of viruses from human sewage at all Rio Olympic water venues. Acknowledging that viral water testing was now necessary, local organizing committee head Carlos Nuzman told the AP that his team was still studying how best to carry out the analysis and what pathogens to search for.

  • Florida Healthy Kids: Federal health law led to price hikes

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Florida Healthy Kids Corporation is blaming President Obama's health care law after notifying parents that health insurance premiums will increase for thousands of kids starting next month, jumping from $140 to as high as $284. Healthy Kids, which offers insurance options where parents can pay full-price or get subsidized coverage depending on eligibility, said the increases will affect the families of nearly 34,749 children in the full-pay program. That's about 19 percent of the organization's 178,873 enrollees. "Despite the federal government's assurances that rates would drop and access would improve - insurance rates increased, many providers canceled coverage, and the makeup of our coverage

  • Valeant steps in to work on psoriasis drug with AstraZeneca

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — Canadian drugmaker Valeant will work with British competitor AstraZeneca on a potential treatment for psoriasis a few months after biotech giant Amgen said it was ending research on the drug because of a link to suicidal thoughts and behavior. Valeant could pay AstraZeneca as much as $445 million if the drug is successfully developed and approved and meets sales targets. The companies will also share profits from the drug. The companies said Tuesday they plan to file for marketing approval of the drug brodalumab in the U.S. and the European Union during the fourth quarter. They want to market it as a treatment for moderate to severe psoriasis, a chronic condition that occurs when a person's immune system spe

  • Browns' Manziel says sore elbow improving, no surgery needed

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    BEREA, Ohio (AP) — Browns quarterback Johnny Manziel has dealt with a sore right arm since before he lifted the Heisman Trophy. Manziel, who hasn't thrown a pass in practice since Aug. 23 because of elbow soreness and tendinitis, said those issues date back to his freshman year at Texas A&M — when he made a dazzling play almost every game for the Aggies. The 22-year-old is confident that rest will help his elbow and the issue won't derail his NFL career. "I'm really not concerned about it at all," he said following Tuesday's practice. However, he and the Browns were alarmed enough to seek second opinions, and they reached out to famed orthopedic surgeon Dr. James Andrews to make sure they were taking the correct cou

  • Off-duty Norfolk police dog bites 3; handler placed on leave

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    NORFOLK, Va. (AP) — A Norfolk police dog bit three people after escaping from his off-duty handler's back yard. Norfolk police say the dog was unsupervised Tuesday when it leaped over the fence at the officer's home. The three men were bit less than two blocks from the officer's home and suffered non-life threatening puncture wounds. Police said in a statement it's unclear why the dog bit the men. The men refused medical treatment and the dog was taken to a local veterinary clinic to be treated for lacerations. The dog has been with the Norfolk Police Department for three years and is now under quarantine. The dog's handler has been assigned to a K-9 unit for three years and has been placed on administrative duty pend

  • Pence announces task force on Indiana drug abuse problems

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Months after outbreaks of HIV and hepatitis drew national attention to rampant intravenous drug abuse in some parts of Indiana, Gov. Mike Pence announced on Tuesday the creation of a task force that will explore the best way to fight addiction. The Republican governor's move comes as authorities across the U.S. are shifting approaches to illegal drug use, moving away from a get-tough-on-crime approach in favor of reduced sentencing for low-level offenders and an acknowledgement that addiction is a public health concern. "We simply cannot arrest our way out of this problem," Pence said at a news conference. "We have to recognize that we also have to address the root causes of addiction and focus on treatm

  • Valeant and Dollar Tree are big market movers

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Tuesday on the New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq Stock Market: NYSE Valeant Pharmaceuticals International Inc., down $6.55 to $224.05 The drug developer is buying rights to AstraZeneca's psoriasis drug brodalumab, which is in late-stage development. Whirlpool Corp., down $7.90 to $160.20 The appliance maker offered to buy Aga Rangemaster, opening up a potential bidding contest with rival Middleby Corp. Hilton Worldwide Holdings Inc., down 73 cents to $24.10 The hotel operator is launching an option for guests to set up automatic notifications to request Uber rides during their stay. M&T Bank Corp., down $5.59 to $112.

  • Child health screening program expands to Greenwood schools

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    GREENWOOD, Miss. (AP) — A hospital is expanding a health screening program for children in the Mississippi Delta, and it should reach more than 2,000 students in Greenwood and Leflore County by April. Greenwood Leflore Hospital is offering its Early Periodic Screening Diagnosis and Treatment Program this year in the Greenwood School District. The Greenwood Commonwealth reports (http://bit.ly/1KDGguL ) the program was offered in Leflore County District during the first year. A clinic team conducts a variety of medical services, including physical, mental, dental, hearing and vision exams. They also teach lessons on hygiene, diet and exercise to students whose parents have signed them up for the program.

  • Approaching health law tax is not just a levy on luxury

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The last major piece of President Barack Obama's health care law could raise costs for thrifty consumers as well as large corporations and union members when it takes effect in 2018. The so-called Cadillac tax was meant to discourage extravagant coverage. Critics say it's a tax on essentials, not luxuries. It's getting attention now because employers plan ahead for major costs like health care. With time, an increasing number of companies will be exposed to the tax, according to a recent study. The risk is that middle-class workers could see their job-based benefits diminished. First to go might be the "flexible spending accounts" offered by many companies.

  • Indiana woman faces new charges for forging nursing license

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A 29-year-old central Indiana woman accused of faking a nursing license faces four new charges related to the case. Court documents show that Ashley Trent of McCordsville now faces a total of 20 charges in Hancock, Hamilton and Marion counties. Those charges include multiple counts of forgery, theft, unlicensed practice of nursing and identity deception. Trent is accused of forging a nursing license and working as a nurse for Developmental Service Alternatives in Greenfield from late 2012 to early 2014. Court documents allege Trent created a fake document from the Indiana Professional Licensing Agency, saying she couldn't renew her license because of a computer glitch, instead of producing a renewed lice

  • Legionnaires' outbreaks not unusual in summer & early fall

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    CHICAGO (AP) — Legionnaires' disease has been reported in a handful of states this summer, leading to 19 deaths and more than 100 illnesses. The unrelated cases are part of a typical pattern seen with a disease that tends to appear in warm weather and is mostly dangerous for people who already sick or weakened. While such outbreaks have become more common in recent years, experts don't know if that's because of better reporting or surveillance, or if the disease, a type of pneumonia, is truly becoming more prevalent, said Dr. Matthew Moore, a medical epidemiologist at the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Regardless, he said disease activity this summer is pretty much "par for the course.

  • White House: Alaska's Medicaid expansion 'right decision'

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — The White House on Tuesday praised the decision by Alaska Gov. Bill Walker to expand Medicaid to thousands of residents over the wishes of the Republican-led Legislature, calling it the "right decision." Alaska on Tuesday became the 29th state to expand Medicaid, opening up health care through what it calls the Healthy Alaska Plan to an estimated 20,000 low-income residents. "Many Alaskans are working two or three jobs to make ends meet, and have not been able to afford health insurance," Walker said. "The Healthy Alaska Plan ensures that working Alaskans will no longer have to choose between health care and bankruptcy.

  • Court: For Medicare purposes, family count includes spouse

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Ohio is illegally excluding spouses from the definition of family when determining eligibility for state assistance, a federal appeals court said in a Tuesday ruling that advocates estimate could affect up to 100,000 people. The decision by the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Cincinnati involves calculations the state makes when determining whether certain seniors on Medicare are eligible for such assistance. The calculations are based on federal poverty levels, which vary depending on family size. The Ohio Department of Medicaid treated individuals applying for the assistance as a family of one, according to the appeals court ruling.

  • AP-ID--Idaho News Coverage,ADVISORY, ID

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    Here's a look at AP's general news coverage in Idaho. Questions about today's coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the Boise bureau at (208) 343-1894. The West Regional Desk can be reached at (602) 417-2400. Please submit your best stories through email to apboise@ap.org. Stories should be in plain text format. A reminder, this information is not for publication or broadcast and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories, digests and digest advisories will keep you up to date. Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates. Idaho a

  • Indianapolis officers begin training on mental illness

    Updated: Tue, Sep 1, 2015

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Dozens of officers with the Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department are learning how to recognize mental illness when responding to calls and the steps needed to keep those situations from escalating. Five days of training with the Crisis Intervention Team began Monday at the police academy. About 40 officers are participating in an effort to help them better understand mental illness, ranging from depression to schizophrenia, the legal process and how to engage others while on a call. "It's just an everyday reality for patrol officers and mental health, medics, firefighters, and everyone (who) deals (with) a lot of mental illness," said Indianapolis Metropolitan Police Department patrol officer Tim




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