• LSU at odds with hospital manager over contracts

    Yesterday

    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — LSU has rejected financial proposals from the manager of its Shreveport and Monroe hospitals that would govern the sharing of computer services, utilities and security. University system health care adviser Jerry Phillips said the documents submitted by the Biomedical Research Foundation of Northwest Louisiana, known as BRF, were insufficient. "They didn't meet the terms that we thought we had agreed on," Phillips said. Though management of the north Louisiana hospitals shifted nearly a year ago, LSU and the research foundation have been unable to reach terms on various financial details of the contract.

  • Bayer to split off polymer division with IPO

    Yesterday

    BERLIN (AP) — German pharmaceuticals and chemicals company Bayer AG said Thursday it plans to spin off its polymer division with a separate stock listing. The Leverkusen-based company that invented aspirin said the move would be part of an effort to focus the group on its health care and crop science businesses. Bayer Material Sciences, or BMS, would have sales of 11.3 billion euros ($14.55 billion) based on 2013 figures, and have a global workforce of about 16,800 employees, said Chief Executive Marijn Dekkers. Analysts have valued BMS at about $10 billion, reported German news agency dpa. The polymer division would likely keep its North American headquarters in Pittsburgh, Dekkers said.

  • Stamford resident contracts west Nile virus

    Yesterday

    STAMFORD, Conn. (AP) — The state Department of Public Health has confirmed that a Stamford resident contracted West Nile virus and has been treated and released from the hospital. The unidentified resident is the second person in Connecticut this season to test positive for the mosquito-borne virus. Anne Fountain, the city's director of public health and social services, said the patient was a 39-year-old man. She says the city is responding to the West Nile threat by placing larvicide in catch basins.

  • Alabama in national Medicaid project

    Yesterday

    MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — The National Governors Association says Alabama, Nevada and Washington will participate in a year-long project to examine ways to spur changes in how states pay for Medicaid and other health care services. The NGA says the project should help the states reach agreements with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for changes in the delivery and payment of health care and in the improvement of health outcomes. Alabama is trying to change its Medicaid program from a fee-for-service model to managed care through regional care organizations. Bentley says the regional care organizations should provide better care at less cost.

  • Missouri wants help testing for fatal deer disease

    Yesterday

    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — State officials are asking hunters to collect tissue from deer killed in north-central Missouri to help track a deadly disease. The Missouri Department of Conservation is requesting the samples to test for chronic wasting disease. The disease is always fatal and threatens to spread among Missouri's 1.3 million wild deer population. Evidence suggests it does not affect humans or domestic animals. Hunters can take deer to regional locations for the tissue sampling between Sept. 15 and Jan. 15. The sample is free and does not reduce the value of deer. The more than 3,600 deer tested last hunting season did not test positive for the disease, but officials say the threat still is significan

  • Groundbreaking set in Troy for children's hospital

    Yesterday

    TROY, Mich. (AP) — Groundbreaking is scheduled for a pediatric specialty care hospital in Oakland County. An invitation-only ceremony will be held Thursday morning at the site for the Children's Hospital of Michigan in Troy, about 14 miles north of Detroit. Officials say the 63,000-square-foot facility will serve patients in and around Oakland County and represents a $42 million investment. About 100 full-time health care jobs will be created. Construction on the three-story building is expected to take about 13 months. The hospital is part of the Detroit Medical Center which operates nine hospitals and health institutes.

  • Dance workout puts moves on women's self-esteem

    Yesterday

    NEW YORK (AP) — When Janet Jones was laid off from her job as a financial assistant two years ago and hit rock bottom, inspiration struck. The former Miami Heat dancer decided to create a women's only workout with a safe space to let loose with girlfriends, listen to hip-hop and rap music, curse and even scream. She called it the "Vixen Workout." As a woman "you need some type of release," says Jones, who has a 5-year-old daughter. "And you're not a bad mother for thinking that, you're not a bad wife, you're not a bad anything," said the 33-year-old Jones, who is based in Miami but also leads workouts in New York and other cities. "You're gonna be a better person, in turn, to your family, if you are the best ver

  • Parents suing center for deaf, autistic children

    Yesterday

    ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The families of three children who spent time at a school for deaf and autistic students are suing the facility after they say their children experienced neglect and various forms of abuse at the hands of the facilities' employees. Three separate lawsuits were filed in Duval County this week on behalf of three children against the National Deaf Academy in Mount Dora, and operator Universal Health Services Inc. The incidents allegedly occurred between 2010 and 2013. None of the children currently remain under the center's care. The center treats children as young as 6 years old, who are deaf or autistic.

  • NFL Injury Report

    Updated: Wed, Sep 17, 2014

    NEW YORK (AP) — INDIANAPOLIS COLTS at JACKSONVILLE JAGUARS — COLTS: DNP: RB Ahmad Bradshaw (not injury related), CB Darius Butler (neck), LB Jerrell Freeman (hamstring), LB D'Qwell Jackson (not injury related), DT Ricky Jean Francois (ankle), DE Arthur Jones (ankle), S LaRon Landry (not injury related), G Joe Reitz (ankle), WR Reggie Wayne (not injury related). LIMITED: WR T.Y. Hilton (groin), CB Greg Toler (ribs). FULL: C Khaled Holmes (ankle). JAGUARS: DNP: CB Alan Ball (abdomen), DE Chris Clemons (illness), RB Toby Gerhart (foot), TE Clay Harbor (calf), WR Allen Hurns (ankle), LB Paul Posluszny (knee). LIMITED: WR Marqise Lee (hamstring), WR Cecil Shorts III (hamstring). FULL: S Johnathan Cyprien (concussion), RB Storm Johnson (an

  • NC agency reviewing Medicaid expansion options

    Updated: Wed, Sep 17, 2014

    RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — North Carolina's health secretary said Wednesday her agency is collecting information for Gov. Pat McCrory to offer him possible ways to expand Medicaid coverage to more people under the federal health care overhaul. The Republican-led General Assembly and McCrory declined to accept expansion last year because they said the state Medicaid office consistently faced shortfalls in the hundreds of millions of dollars. A state audit and other troubled operations led McCrory to call the $13 billion program "broken." But Health and Human Services Secretary Dr. Aldona Wos told a legislative committee the agency's financial and structural improvements make offering credible options doable. "We are at a poi

  • House grudgingly approves arms for Syrian rebels

    Updated: Wed, Sep 17, 2014

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Republican-controlled House voted grudgingly Wednesday to give the administration authority to train and arm Syrian rebels as President Barack Obama emphasized anew that American forces "do not and will not have a combat mission" in the struggle against Islamic State militants in either Iraq or Syria. The 273-156 vote crossed party lines to an unusual degree in a Congress marked by near-ceaseless partisanship. Top Republican and Democratic leaders backed Obama's plan seven weeks before midterm elections, while dozens of rank-and-file lawmakers in both parties opposed it. The provision was added to spending legislation that will ensure the federal government operates normally after the Sept. 30 end of t

  • First lady visits St. Jude Hospital in Memphis

    Updated: Wed, Sep 17, 2014

    MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — First lady Michelle Obama visited with young patients at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis on Wednesday, telling them she was inspired by their focus and courage as they battle life-threatening diseases. Mrs. Obama was making her first visit to St. Jude as first lady, following in the footsteps of Nancy Reagan, Barbara Bush and Hillary Rodham Clinton. She chatted with the patients in an activity room and participated in a question and answer session. The first lady's plane was delayed by about 1 ½ hours due to a maintenance issue, but the children patiently waited for her, working on an art project. St. Jude is considered a leading researcher of cancer and other life-threatening d

  • Enterovirus 68 confirmed in Minnesota

    Updated: Wed, Sep 17, 2014

    ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Minnesota has joined a group of states reporting a respiratory illness caused by the virus known as enterovirus 68. State health officials said Wednesday that a case was confirmed Tuesday evening via lab tests from child hospitalized with acute symptoms. The child has since been released and is recovering at home, the agency said. Shortly after the Department of Health report, the University of Minnesota said it had confirmed 11 cases at its children's hospital in Minneapolis, Minnesota Public Radio News reported. A hospital spokeswoman told The Associated Press she did not know the conditions of the patients. The Health Department said the results confirmed suspicions that enterovirus is circul

  • Arizona GOP replaces Pearce as top leader

    Updated: Wed, Sep 17, 2014

    PHOENIX (AP) — The Arizona Republican Party has named a replacement for former Sen. Russell Pearce, who resigned his top party post following a backlash to his remarks advocating mandatory contraception or sterilization for people on Medicaid and tighter restrictions on how people on public assistance use the funds. Party chairman Robert Graham announced Wednesday that he named longtime Tucson party activist Parralee Schneider as vice chair to replace Pearce. Graham named Phoenix resident Jeni White to replace Schneider as second vice chair. Meanwhile, Democrats continue to push for Pearce to be fired from his recently-landed job as a top manager with the Maricopa County Treasurer.

  • Doctor says Toronto Mayor Rob Ford has cancer

    Updated: Wed, Sep 17, 2014

    TORONTO (AP) — Toronto's embattled mayor has a rare and difficult cancer that will require aggressive chemotherapy, his doctor said Wednesday, days after Rob Ford's dramatic announcement that he was pulling out of a re-election campaign. Dr. Zane Cohen, a colorectal surgeon at Mount Sinai hospital, said Ford has a malignant liposarcoma. Ford has been hospitalized for a week with a tumor in his abdomen. Cohen said the cancer is spreading and that they have found "a small nodule in the buttock" near the left hip. He said the mayor will be treated with fairly intensive chemotherapeutic agents within the next two days. "We think it's fairly an aggressive tumor," Cohen said. He said Ford had a CT scan in 2011 and there was

  • Medi-Cal patients sue over application backlog

    Updated: Wed, Sep 17, 2014

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Medi-Cal patients and health care advocates filed a lawsuit against the state Wednesday for leaving hundreds of thousands of low-income and disabled people waiting months for care. The suit filed in Alameda County Superior Court aims to get the California Department of Health Care Services to process applications within a required 45-day time frame. One plaintiff, 68-year old Frances Rivera of Visalia, said she lost her adult son, Robert, who died from a pulmonary embolism while waiting to hear back about his Medi-Cal application. The application was approved two months after he died. "It's not easy watching someone you love go through this, and there's nothing you can do," Rivera said in a s

  • Nebraska health insurance cost dispute unresolved

    Updated: Wed, Sep 17, 2014

    OMAHA, Neb. (AP) — A major Nebraska health insurer has been unable to come to terms with one of the state's biggest medical networks, so thousands of people are either facing significantly higher costs or changing doctors. No talks have been held since the contract between Blue Cross Blue Shield of Nebraska and Catholic Health Initiatives expired Sept. 1. So the facilities and doctors affiliated with Catholic Health Initiatives are no longer part of the Blue Cross network. "Blue Cross has created a mess for people all across the state of Nebraska," said Dr. Cliff Robertson, CEO of CHI Health. The expired contract covered all CHI Health hospitals in Omaha, Schuyler and Plainview.

  • State no longer insures UNM child cancer claims

    Updated: Wed, Sep 17, 2014

    SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Taxpayers have subsidized insurance costs for the University of New Mexico for cases that the state has paid $48 million for in medical malpractice claims over the treatment of children with leukemia, according to a top official in Gov. Susana Martinez's administration. But that subsidy ended in July when the state's taxpayer-financed insurance program stopped providing liability coverage for UNM hospital for claims stemming from the alleged substandard treatment of children with leukemia from 1979 to 1996. Instead, UNM has assumed responsibility for future liability claims and legal costs for the child cancer lawsuits. The state will continue to provide insurance for all other coverage.

  • Health leader defends criticized Medicaid report

    Updated: Wed, Sep 17, 2014

    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Louisiana's health department said Wednesday that its evaluation of the state's Medicaid privatization was on target, despite criticism from the legislative auditor that it lacked key data and contained inconsistencies. The auditor's office told lawmakers the report from the Department of Health and Hospitals had mathematical errors, offered skewed comparisons and presented unsubstantiated performance reviews. DHH Secretary Kathy Kliebert disagreed with the auditor's findings. "We don't believe it paints a complete picture concerning what we thought was a really good response to what was requested," Kliebert told the Legislative Audit Advisory Council, a legislative panel that oversees the audi

  • Drugstores, retailers dive deeper into vaccines

    Updated: Wed, Sep 17, 2014

    Walgreen provided enough flu shots last season to protect a population roughly twice the size of Los Angeles. CVS doled out more than 5 million, or double its total from a few years ago. And Wal-Mart, the world's largest retailer, offers flu shots at more than 4,200 of its U.S. stores that have pharmacies. The nation's biggest drugstores and other retailers are grabbing larger chunks of the immunization market, giving customers more convenient options outside the doctor's office to protect themselves against the flu, pneumonia and other illnesses. In fact, nearly half of all flu vaccines provided to adults are now administered in non-medical settings like drugstores or worksite clinics.