• Burglary victim found dead in Monroe apartment

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    MONROE, La. (AP) — Monroe police have arrest a suspect in the death of Louisiana state Representative Frank Hoffman's sister, whose body was found in her burning apartment. Police tell KNOE TV (http://bit.ly/1bB4Tdl) Shirley Cagle's body was found Thursday night after officers responded to a burglary complaint. Police say they were told the suspect had left behind his identification. A short time later Robert Nelson was arrested near his home. Police say Nelson confessed to the death. He was booked with second-degree murder, aggravated arson and several other charges. His bond is set at $2 million. Police believe Nelson broke into the apartment to get money to support his drug addiction. Online

  • Spike Lee’s ‘Chiraq’ would add to city’s long violent filmography

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    As the camera pans over the Chicago skyline in the opening frames of the 1953 noir “City That Never Sleeps,” a voice-over contemplates the nuances of “this giant, sprawling, sordid and beautiful, poor and magnificent city.” All these decades later, a description that still rings true. The story follows a jaded beat cop who wants out of both the job and his marriage, with an eye on sexier doings with the stripper he keeps on the side. She’s called Angel Face. Of course. “When I first came to this town,” she says, in a slice of delicious noir-speak, “I was gonna be — oh, there were a lot of things I was gonna do. Become famous. But Chicago’s the big melting pot, and I got melted but good.

  • Americans Are Drinking More Heavily, Especially Women

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    Whether quaffing artisanal cocktails at hipster bars or knocking back no-name beers on the couch, more Americans are drinking heavily – and engaging in episodes of binge-drinking, concludes a major study of alcohol use. Heavy drinking among Americans rose 17.2 percent between 2005 and 2012, largely due to rising rates among women, according to the study by the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation at the University of Washington, published Thursday in the American Journal of Public Health. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention defines heavy drinking as exceeding an average of one drink per day during the past month for women and two drinks per day for men.

  • Optum acquires walk-in medical care provider MedExpress

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    MORGANTOWN, W.Va. (AP) — Health services company Optum has acquired walk-in medical care provider MedExpress. Media outlets report that terms of the sale were not disclosed. Eden Prairie, Minnesota-based Optum announced the sale earlier this month. It is a subsidiary of UnitedHealth Group Inc., the nation's largest health insurer. MedExpress operates 141 neighborhood medical centers in 11 states with plans to open 25 to 30 additional centers this year. It has 23 locations in West Virginia. MedExpress spokeswoman Kelly Sorice says the company will retain its administrative offices in Morgantown and Canonsburg, Pennsylvania. The company was founded in Morgantown in 2001.

  • New tool to help problem gamblers?

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    SANTA FE – New Mexico tribes for years have provided a way for problem gamblers to voluntarily get themselves banned from individual Indian casinos, but the new state-tribal gambling compact would take it to another level. Under the compact awaiting approval by the U.S. Department of Interior, tribes that sign the agreement would participate in a statewide self-exclusion program. Compulsive gamblers could fill out applications to be included in a statewide database aimed at keeping them out of tribal casinos covered by the compact. Racetracks, under a 2009 state law, already have that system for the casinos they operate.

  • Amtrak says Illinois pets-on-trains pilot project a success

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    CHICAGO (AP) — Amtrak says it has not had a single complaint or problem with a pilot project in Illinois allowing customers to travel with small pets. So, it's making the program permanent around the state. About 200 animals have accompanied passengers since the pilot project began a year ago. Illinois is the first state to work with Amtrak to offer the service. Amtrak President and CEO Joe Boardman said Wednesday the rail service is now considering allowing pets on other routes. Travelers planning to bring pets must make advanced reservations and pay a $25 surcharge. Only animals weighing 20 pounds or less are allowed and they must be in carriers. Amtrak permits service animals on trains at no charge.

  • Museum hosts exhibit on history of Henry Ford Health System

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    DETROIT (AP) — The Detroit Historical Museum is hosting an exhibit about the evolution and growth of Henry Ford Health System during the past century. "Henry Ford Health System: 100 Years Measured in Life" opened Saturday and is on display through Jan. 3, 2016, at the museum in the city's Midtown area. The exhibit starts in 1915, with auto pioneer Henry Ford taking control of the stalled 48-bed Detroit General Hospital project that would become Henry Ford Hospital. The exhibit includes 100 stories of transforming health and life. An event featuring hospital officials and a member of the Ford family took place Thursday afternoon. The museum is open 9:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Tuesday through Friday and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunda

  • Bay Area binge drinking on the rise

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP) — Binge drinking has surged in the Bay Area over the past decade and researchers say Silicon Valley culture may have something to do with it. KPIX-TV reports (http://cbsloc.al/1yWhli0 ) reports that University of Washington researchers say binge drinking in Santa Clara County went up 28 percent, the highest of any California County. Santa Clara women's binge drinking rose by almost 36 percent. San Mateo County and San Francisco aren't far behind. Researchers say a social shift has made it more acceptable for women to drink in ways traditionally considered masculine. They also blame the influx of young professionals into a work-hard, party-hard field like the tech industry.

  • Biogen results rise, but miss 1Q forecasts

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    CAMBRIDGE, Mass. (AP) — Biogen Idec Inc. reported lower-than-expected profit and revenue for the first quarter on slower sales growth of its multiple sclerosis drug Tecfidera. Its shares fell more than 4 percent in premarket trading Friday. The biotechnology company reported its first-quarter profit climbed 71 percent to $822.5 million, or $3.49 per share. Earnings, adjusted for one-time gains and costs, were $3.82 per share. But that missed Wall Street expectations, with the average estimate of 18 analysts surveyed by Zacks Investment Research expecting $3.92 per share. Revenue rose 20 percent to $2.55 billion, which also fell short of Street forecasts. Nineteen analysts surveyed by Zacks expected $2.66 billio

  • Arizona expands quarantine area targeting citrus disease

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    PHOENIX (AP) — Arizona continues to expand a citrus quarantine aimed at heading off a disease that can devastate groves because of a tiny insect. The state Department of Agriculture announced Thursday that the quarantine area now includes more of Maricopa County and a sliver of southwestern Yavapai County northwest of metro Phoenix. Quarantine areas already included much of western Arizona as well as a small part of Santa Cruz County. The Asian Citrus Psyllid can carry citrus greening disease. The insect was first detected in southern Yuma County in 2009, but Arizona officials say they haven't yet detected the disease itself. The quarantine prohibits movement of untreated fruit and plants that don't have all gre

  • Boys and Girls Clubs awarded big grant from Arizona AG

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    PHOENIX (AP) — Boys and Girls Clubs in Arizona have been awarded $670,000 from a special Arizona attorney general's fund to pay for anti-obesity and diabetes prevention programs over the next two years. The grant announced by the Arizona Alliance of Boys & Girls Clubs Thursday will fund a program promoting healthy living among children age six to 18 and one for American Indian youth designed to prevent early-onset diabetes. The money comes from a 2011 multi-state settlement with GlaxoSmithKline that resolved allegations the drugmaker illegally promoted the diabetes drug Avandia. Arizona was awarded $3.1 million and $2.4 million will go to groups addressing obesity.

  • Kodiak fundraiser to benefit golfer diagnosed with cancer

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    KODIAK, Alaska (AP) — Kodiak residents are rallying around golfer and Ireland native James McCarthy and his brother Peter, both of whom are battling cancer. The Kodiak Daily Mirror reports (http://bit.ly/1DjuKvK ) that despite his pancreatic cancer diagnosis, James McCarthy still spends time his good days hitting golf balls in Anchorage. McCarthy won the island's golf championship titles in 2008 and 2009. In 2014, he was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. He had surgery last year and is now undergoing chemotherapy and radiation treatments. His family is holding a fundraiser for both brothers at Kodiak Harbor Convention Center on Saturday. The $50 event includes a halibut Olympia dinner, a live auction and m

  • Dairy cow herd in Alpena County tests positive for bovine TB

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    LACHINE, Mich. (AP) — A medium-sized herd of dairy cows in Michigan's northeastern Lower Peninsula has tested positive for bovine tuberculosis, according to the state. Routine surveillance testing made the confirmation in Alpena County, the Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development said in a release. It is the 61st herd in Michigan found to have the infectious bacterial disease since 1998. Bovine tuberculosis affects cattle and white-tailed deer in the northeastern Lower Peninsula. It can be transmitted between wildlife populations and other mammals, including humans. "Finding TB in a herd is always hard on the impacted farm," said Dr. Rick Smith, assistant state veterinarian.

  • Religion news in brief

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    Catholics say final farewell to Chicago's Cardinal George CHICAGO (AP) — Top elected officials, clergy members and Chicago-area Catholics have attended the funeral for Cardinal Francis George, who was remembered as a vigorous defender of Roman Catholic orthodoxy. About 1,200 people attended Thursday's funeral Mass at Chicago's Holy Name Cathedral, which followed three days of visitation. Seattle Archbishop J. Peter Sartain said Cardinal George "was so utterly a Christian that no circumstance seemed inappropriate for him to give witness to Christ." George died last Friday at age 78 after a long fight with cancer. He retired last fall and was replaced by Archbishop Blase Cupich (blayz SOO'-pich).

  • Missouri House OKs allowing aspiring doctors to retake exam

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — A Republican lawmaker who is an orthopedic surgeon says a measure moving forward in the Legislature would help alleviate the shortage of physicians in the state. The Missouri House on Thursday approved a measure by a vote of 110-36 that would remove the prohibition on physicians seeking licensure in the state from taking an exam more than three times. Rep. Keith Frederick, of Rolla, says other medical professions do not have such limits and that taking the exam multiple times would not reflect a physician's skill. Some opponents say they are concerned that quality of care would suffer and patients would be put at risk. The measure now goes to the Senate.

  • Prison inmates in addiction program to run 5K

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Utah State Prison inmates participating in an addiction recovery program will run in a 5-kilometer race next week. Prison officials said Thursday the 72 male inmates have been training for several months to run the 5K race, which will be held at the Draper prison's Promontory Facility on April 28. Authorities say the run was organized under the Addict II Athlete program, which is designed a support group for people facing stress and addiction. Female inmates from the Orange Street Community Correctional Center did a 5K run through the program last year.

  • 500 pounds of bratwurst recalled in Springfield

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Roughly 500 pounds of bratwurst is being recalled by a meat packing company in Springfield. The Illinois Department of Agriculture's meat and poultry inspection division announced the recall of the North Clay Packing Co. product Thursday because the sausages contain milk, which is not declared on the product's label. The product subject to the recall was sold as white five pound boxes labeled as "Illini Land Bratwurst." The bratwurst was produced between May 23, 2013, through Sept. 3, of the following year and sold in Coles County. The Agriculture Department discovered the recall during an inspection by meat and poultry inspectors. Officials say that no illnesses related to the product's

  • Grant aimed at stopping pregnant smokers in Kentucky

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    FRANKFORT, Ky. (AP) — The Kentucky Department for Public Health has announced a grant to address the issue of women who smoke while pregnant. The Anthem Foundation is supplying the $140,000 grant, which will help fund the Giving Infants and Families Tobacco Free Starts program. The program is aimed at decreasing the number of women who smoke during pregnancy and reducing exposure to secondhand smoke. The funding will be used in Christian, Hopkins and Madison counties. According to the state, smoking during pregnancy has declined in Kentucky over the past decade. Smoking rates among pregnant women dropped from 26 percent in 2004 to 22 percent in 2013.

  • Elementary school student dies from bacterial meningitis

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    TUNICA, Miss. (AP) — The Mississippi Department of Health says a 7-year-old elementary school student has died from bacterial meningitis, but cautions the strain is not contagious. WREG-TV in Memphis (http://bit.ly/1GoW3wh) reports the student attended Tunica Elementary. His identity hasn't been released. Health officials distributed free antibiotics to about 80 students Thursday who had been in close contact with the boy. Officials say the treatment is out of an abundance of caution. Bacterial meningitis is an infection of the lining of the brain which causes sudden fever, severe headache and neck stiffness. It can be spread through saliva or mucus but is not as contagious as the cold or flu virus.

  • USDA says avian flu could spread to Northeast

    Updated: Fri, Apr 24, 2015

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Bird flu is ravaging the Midwest, and federal experts say it could spread to the Northeast if birds in the Atlantic flyway become infected with a highly contagious strain. Chief veterinary officer John Clifford of the U.S. Department of Agriculture says a strain of the influenza has been found along the Pacific, Central and Mississippi River flyways. He says the disease could be carried eastward by such migratory birds as wild geese and ducks as they head for northern breeding grounds over the summer and expose more birds to the disease. Clifford says it's possible the virus could spread to the Atlantic flyway by fall. The H5N2 virus has already cost Midwest turkey and chicken producers over 7 mill




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