• Michigan confirms 1st case of chronic wasting in wild deer

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    DETROIT (AP) — Wildlife officials on Tuesday confirmed Michigan's first case of chronic wasting disease in a wild deer. The Michigan Department of Natural Resources announced a white-tailed female deer in Ingham County's Meridian Township tested positive for the contagious and fatal disease that attacks the brains of infected deer and elk. Officials say they will require mandatory testing of deer killed in the surrounding area during hunting season and implement a deer and elk feeding and baiting ban in Ingham, Shiawassee and Clinton counties. Unlimited antlerless deer hunting licenses also will be available in the surrounding area, and officials say they will work with trained professionals before hunting season to kill de

  • 12 detained after fire kills 38 at seniors' home in China

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    BEIJING (AP) — At least 12 people connected to the privately run home for the elderly in central China where 38 people died in a fire earlier this week have been taken into custody by the police, state media reported Wednesday. The official Xinhua News Agency reported that the 12 included the legal representative of the Kangleyuan Rest Home, and that police were searching for another three employees. The fire broke out Monday night in the facility, which housed 51 residents in the city of Pingdingshan in Henan province, the province's work safety administration said in a statement. In addition to the dozens who died, six people were injured, including two in serious condition, the statement said.

  • Alcohol at root of troubles for defendant

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    Attorneys on Tuesday argued for an inpatient treatment program for a defendant who violated his sentencing terms by drinking alcohol. In an April bench trial, Aaron Waller, 26, was found guilty of felony unlawful use of a weapon. Earlier this month, Mr. Waller landed in jail because he used alcohol while wearing a monitoring device. Attorneys for both sides recommended the inpatient treatment because of the defendant's alcohol dependency. Circuit Judge Dan Kellogg agreed and in suspending the defendant's sentence ordered Mr. Waller to complete a 120-day prison treatment program.

  • Democrats show priorities as they advance 2016 budget plan

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — A plan Illinois Democrats are proposing as an alternative to the steep cuts sought by Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner would keep budget levels flat for local governments and Medicaid and only modestly reduce higher education assistance, committee leaders said Tuesday. One day after Democratic leaders announced the $36.3 billion proposal for the fiscal year that begins in July, some of the details became clearer. In several areas, the budget plan contrasts vividly with the plan Rauner unveiled in February, setting up a major test for the newly divided government as the state prepares to grapple with its significant financial problems.

  • California bill compels abortion notice at pregnancy centers

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Californians who visit crisis pregnancy centers must know whether the facility is licensed and that abortion is an option under legislation advanced Tuesday by the state Assembly. AB775 advanced on a party-line vote with Republicans saying it would violate free speech protections. The bill responded to reports of misinformation at pregnancy centers that are opposed to abortion, including an unsubstantiated link between abortion and breast cancer. "Women in California deserve to know about all of their options about family planning and reproductive health care so that they can make truly informed decisions," said bill author Assemblywoman Autumn Burke, D-Inglewood.

  • Seattle to shutter dozens of medical marijuana dispensaries

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    SEATTLE (AP) — With Washington state overhauling its medical marijuana law, Seattle Mayor Ed Murray says the city is planning to shutter dozens of dispensaries. Murray on Tuesday announced plans to require a new special business license for marijuana establishments, akin to those required for taxi operators and pawn shops. Under the mayor's plan, the businesses will be required to obtain the licenses by July 2016. But just as the state's new medical marijuana law gives priority in licensing to dispensaries that were in operation before Jan. 1, 2013, so does Murray's proposal. Seattle officials say that by their tally, 54 of the city's 99 medical marijuana storefronts opened after that date or have been operating without a c

  • Search is on after man dies of rare Lassa fever

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — New Jersey officials are trying to track down health care workers and others who had contact with a man who died of an infectious disease that is rarely seen in the United States. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Monday that a man had died of Lassa fever, days after returning from a trip to West Africa. University Hospital in Newark said Tuesday the man had been transferred there Saturday from another hospital because it could deal with viral hemorrhagic fevers. The hospital said in a statement that it is reviewing whether any of its employees were at risk of exposure to the virus.

  • Bird flu returns to Minnesota with 6 newly infected farms

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Bird flu returned to Minnesota after more than a week without a new case, as presumptive positive test results came back Tuesday from six turkey farms. The new detections announced by the Minnesota Board of Animal Health included the first case in Brown County, a farm with 46,800 turkeys. They also included three new outbreaks at turkey farms in Kandiyohi and two in Renville counties. The new cases raise the state's total to 94 farms affected in 22 counties, including 36 in Kandiyohi, the top turkey-producing county in the nation's No. 1 turkey-producing state.

  • Wisconsin officials lift avian flu quarantine

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    MADISON, Wis. (AP) — Agriculture officials have lifted a quarantine zone around a Chippewa County farm where thousands of turkeys were infected with bird flu. The state Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection confirmed last month that 87,000 turkeys on the farm had been infected. The farm was immediately quarantined and the turkeys euthanized. DATCP also established a quarantine zone within a 6.2 mile-radius of the farm. The designation prohibits moving poultry outside the farm or the zone without DATCP approval. Agency officials announced Tuesday that there's been no new cases detected in the county and the zone has been lifted. The farm itself remains under quarantine.

  • Ballot proposals for 2016 election include medical marijuana

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — A South Dakota medical marijuana supporter hopes to begin gathering signatures within a month to put a proposal on the 2016 ballot to allow people with serious medical conditions to use marijuana. Melissa Mentele, an activist from Emery, South Dakota, said Tuesday that the ballot language she's been working on is now under review at the state Attorney General's office. Mentele and other organizers need 13,871 signatures by Nov. 8 to get the proposal on the 2016 ballot. Mentele, 38, said she's attempting to help patients similar to herself — she suffers from reflex sympathetic dystrophy — who have debilitating medical conditions ranging from cancer to post-traumatic stress disorder.

  • 5 Things to Know in Florida for May 27

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    Your daily look at news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today. FLORIDA SENATE OFFERS HEALTH CARE COVERAGE COMPROMISE Top Florida senators are offering up a revamped health care coverage plan in an effort to end a stalemate with Republican House leaders and Gov. Rick Scott. Senate President Andy Gardiner announced Tuesday that the Senate was changing its proposal to offer coverage to 800,000 Floridians. The House and Senate have been at odds over coverage and the dispute derailed the regular session. Legislators are scheduled to return to the Capitol next week to pass a new state budget.

  • Florida Senate offers health care coverage compromise

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Republican leaders in the Florida Senate offered up a revamped health care proposal Tuesday in an effort to end a budget stalemate that threatens to shut down state government, but the proposal was immediately rejected by Gov. Rick Scott and House GOP leaders. Legislators are scheduled to return to the state Capitol next week for a 20-day special session where they are expected to pass a new state budget. Senate President Andy Gardiner announced what he called a "compromise" on health care coverage that is an attempt to win over both skeptical House leaders as well as Scott.

  • Officials say 2 new probable cases of bird flu in Iowa

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — State officials say there are two probable cases of bird flu in Adair and Webster counties in Iowa. The Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship says initial testing at two commercial laying operations were positive for bird flu. The operations have a combined total of about 1.1 million birds. The agency said Monday if the disease is confirmed, all birds on the properties will be euthanized. It would also mean there are now 66 cases of the disease in Iowa.

  • School: No more vaginal procedures for ultrasound training

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — A Florida community college says it will no longer have ultrasound technician students practice an invasive vaginal procedure on each other. Two former students sued Valencia College in federal court earlier this month, claiming they were punished when they objected to undergoing the procedure. Valencia College's president said in a statement Tuesday that students will use simulators when practicing the invasive ultrasound scanning. President Sandy Shugart says an independent expert reviewed the program last summer after the students complained and concluded the procedure was done safely and professionally.

  • NY settles lawsuits over disabled man's death, records show

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York is settling lawsuits against staff at a state residence in Queens where a 33-year-old disabled man was killed three years ago when he was restrained, according to court papers and attorneys in the case. The suits by Rasheen Rose's sister, Shaneice Luke, alleged that at least three staff at Fineson Developmental Center threw Rose to the ground and one sat on him while others stood by. The $2.15 million settlement shows the level of culpability, her lawyers said Tuesday. The settlement in principle is still being finalized, they said. The New York City medical examiner ruled Rose's death a homicide. Queens prosecutors haven't charged anyone. Staff have denied wrongdoing, saying they ac

  • Baptist Health, Verizon Foundation launch diabetes study

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — The Verizon Foundation and Baptist Health have announced a pilot program to study whether mobile technology can improve the health of diabetes patients. The foundation is putting up $427,700 to help fund the year-long program. Participants include two groups of medically-underserved patients in Pulaski County with Type 2 diabetes who manage their disease at home. One group of 125 participants will receive smartphones with relevant apps and monitoring devices to help them manage their diabetes, blood pressure and weight. The second group of 125 participants will receive standard monitoring devices, including blood pressure machines, test strips and exercise logs. Both groups have access to a support

  • Missouri's corrections system has a drug problem

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    Smugglers and contraband have been around as long as security, walls — and addicts. In Missouri’s prison system, the cat-and-mouse game of illicit drugs pits 32,000 inmates of the Department of Corrections and thousands more on probation and parole, against the 11,000 employees of the Department of Corrections. It’s a game that Missouri’s largest agency often loses, according to a Post-Dispatch assessment of the prison system’s own data. Narcotics violations accounted for about a fifth of 5,065 reports of illegal activity within Missouri’s prison system from 2011 to mid-2014.

  • Cancer diagnosis leads to plans for brewery, theater

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — A cancer diagnosis has prompted a couple to move ahead on plans to open a brewery and improvisational theater in Ann Arbor, drawing the name for the planned establishment from a tough day when everything felt pointless. Tori Tomalia was diagnosed in 2013 with lung cancer that had spread to other parts of her body. A nonsmoker, she soon underwent chemotherapy. Drug treatment continues and her condition has improved, but there's always the prospect of a change. She and her husband Jason had hoped to open a theater after they had established careers and after their children were grown, The Ann Arbor News and the Detroit Free Press reported.

  • Overdose reversal kits being supplied to more Ky. hospitals

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    EDGEWOOD, Ky. (AP) — A hospital system on the front lines of treating heroin overdoses in hard-hit northern Kentucky will be supplied with hundreds of naloxone kits to send home with overdose patients in an effort to combat the deadly toll from the drug scourge. An emergency nurse manager said Tuesday the overdose reversal kits will save lives and provide a starting point for conversations about treatment. The St. Elizabeth Healthcare system will receive about 500 kits for its hospitals, Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway and first lady Jane Beshear announced. Northern Kentucky has been at the epicenter of the state's struggles with heroin addiction. Naloxone is available in injectable or nasal mist forms.

  • TV food star Sandra Lee back home after cancer surgery

    Updated: Tue, May 26, 2015

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — Food Network star Sandra Lee is recovering at home after being discharged from the hospital following a double mastectomy. Lee posted photos to her Facebook page Monday showing her smiling and sitting with her pet cockatoo and her live-in boyfriend, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, in the backyard of their suburban New York City home. Lee had surgery last week. She revealed her breast cancer diagnosis this month on ABC's "Good Morning America." The 48-year-old "Semi-Homemade Cooking" star says she decided to talk about her illness to encourage other women to get screened for breast cancer. Cuomo took some personal time to be with Lee after her operation.




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