• 'Bomb' hooked to man in animal suit really flotation device

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    BALTIMORE (AP) — A young man in an animal costume and surgical mask who walked into a Baltimore TV station Thursday claiming to have a bomb was shot and wounded by police, who determined that his alleged explosive consisted of aluminum-wrapped chocolate bars duct-taped to a flotation device. The 25-year-old white male was in serious but stable condition at a hospital and expected to survive, said Baltimore Police Department spokesman T.J. Smith. Smith said the man was from nearby Howard County, but that police would not identify him until they filed charges against him. The progressively bizarre scene unfolded Thursday afternoon when the man walked into the lobby of Fox affiliate WBFF on Baltimore's TV Hill.

  • Iowa regent directs furniture company that won no-bid deal

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    IOWA CITY, Iowa (AP) — A prominent regent failed to publicly disclose that she was a paid director for a national furniture company before its local distributor signed a lucrative no-bid contract with the University of Iowa last year, records show. Manufacturing executive and Republican donor Mary Andringa abruptly resigned Wednesday from the Iowa Board of Regents, one year into her six-year term. She said she underestimated how much time it would take to serve on the board, which governs the state's three public universities. An Iowa City Press-Citizen story published Tuesday raised questions about the university's agreement to buy Herman Miller furniture from its local certified dealer, Pigott, last year.

  • Drug company to pay back rebates owed to Washington

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    SEATTLE (AP) — The state attorney general's office has announced a national pharmaceutical company accused of underpaying drug rebates owed to Medicaid will pay Washington $22.9 million. A statement from the state's legal office Thursday says Wyeth, owned by drugmaker Pfizer, Inc., agreed to pay a total of $784.6 million to the federal government and 34 other states for allegedly underpaying rebates required through a federal measure for the sale of two drugs between 2001 and 2006. Part of Washington's total $46.7 million haul will go to the federal government, with $22.9 million coming back to the state's Medicaid program. Pfizer is headquartered in New York, and Wyeth is headquartered Madison, N.J. They're both Dela

  • House votes to ban second-trimester abortion procedure

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — An effort to prohibit a commonly used second-trimester abortion procedure received overwhelming support Thursday from lawmakers in the Louisiana House. The bill by Rep. Mike Johnson, a Republican from Bossier City who is running for Congress, would ban a procedure called dilation and evacuation, known as D&E. The procedure would only be allowed if necessary to prevent "serious health risk" to the mother. The House voted 83-0 for the bill, which heads next to the Senate for consideration. No one spoke in opposition to the prohibition measure on the House floor, and there was no debate. More than 20 lawmakers were absent.

  • Gilead 1Q profit tumbles on slower hepatitis C drug sales

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Gilead Science Inc.'s earnings tumbled more than 17 percent in the first quarter as steeper discounts and rebates on its blockbuster hepatitis C drugs cut into sales. The maker of Harvoni, the first once-daily, single-pill regimen for hepatitis C, said Thursday that sales of the best-selling drug fell 15 percent to $3 billion in the quarter, with the biggest drop-off in the U.S. and Japan. Gilead attributed the decline to discounts given to private insurers and higher rebates for patients in government-run health plans like Medicaid. Harvoni's decline was partially offset by higher sales for an older hepatitis C drug, Sovaldi, which grew to $1.28 billion.

  • APNewsBreak: South Dakota tribe sues feds over ER closure

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — A Native American tribe in South Dakota sued the federal government Thursday over the nearly five-month closure of the only emergency room on its reservation. The federal lawsuit filed Thursday by the Rosebud Sioux Tribe asks that federal officials be forced to re-open the emergency room at the hospital administered by the Indian Health Service. The agency shuttered the ER in early December, two weeks after federal inspectors uncovered serious failures that they said put patients' lives at risk. The lawsuit, which The Associated Press obtained ahead of it being filed, contends that the Indian Health Service — an arm of the U.S.

  • Massachusetts Senate approves under-21 ban on tobacco sales

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    BOSTON (AP) — The Massachusetts Senate voted overwhelmingly Thursday to raise the minimum age for purchasing cigarettes and other tobacco products across the state, which could make it the second to raise its threshold to 21 years old. The higher age is already in effect in Boston and more than 100 other cities and towns, covering about half the state's population. The bill, which moves to the House after being approved on a 32-2 vote, also sets new regulations for electronic cigarettes including a ban on vaping in places where smoking is otherwise prohibited. It would also ban the sale of tobacco in pharmacies and other health care facilities. Stores caught selling tobacco to people under 21 would face fines ranging

  • Facebook and St. Jude Medical surge, GNC and AbbVie skid

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    NEW YORK (AP) — Stocks that moved substantially or traded heavily Thursday on the New York Stock Exchange and the Nasdaq stock market: NYSE St. Jude Medical Inc., up $15.84 to $77.79 The heart device maker agreed to be acquired by Abbott Laboratories in a $19.3 billion cash and stock deal. GNC Holdings Inc., down $10.28 to $25.32 The nutritional supplement company reported weak first-quarter results, including lower vitamin sales. Hanesbrands Inc., up $1.74 to $29.53 The maker of underwear, T-shirts and socks, said it will buy Pacific Brands, the biggest maker of underwear in Australia. AbbVie Inc., up 50 cents to $61.

  • US stocks skid as Apple pulls tech companies lower

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    NEW YORK (AP) — U.S. stocks took their biggest loss in three weeks on Thursday after a late sell-off. Apple, which is mired in a slump, fell to its lowest price in about two months and dragged the tech sector sharply lower. Tech stocks, which rose early on thanks to earnings gains from Facebook and PayPal, slumped after billionaire investor Carl Icahn disclosed that he'd sold his stake in Apple. Icahn wasn't a major shareholder in the tech giant, but his moves are closely watched by many investors. The Dow Jones industrial average lost 210.79 points, or 1.2 percent, to 17,830.76. The Standard & Poor's 500 index fell 19.34 points, or 0.9 percent, to 2,075.81. The Nasdaq composite closed lower for the sixth day in a row, losi

  • Critics of $1 billion NFL concussion deal seek court review

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Critics of the proposed $1 billion settlement of NFL concussion claims want a full U.S. appeals court in Philadelphia to review a recent court decision that upheld the deal. The challengers believe the lead players' lawyers negotiated away compensation for the key complaint in the original lawsuit, a brain disease known as chronic traumatic encephalopathy, because the science is still being developed. In their appeal Thursday, they said the lead players' lawyers traded away the CTE issue in exchange for higher awards for less common problems, such as Parkinson's disease and dementia. CTE can currently only be diagnosed at autopsy, although some researchers hope to diagnose it in the living within 10 year

  • House GOP seeks to block stricter rule on retirement savings

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The GOP-controlled House has voted along party lines to overturn new Obama administration rules requiring stricter standards for brokers regarding retirement investments. Thursday's 234-183 vote to reject the rules was driven by Republicans who warn they will limit the options available to investors and could cause brokers to abandon retirement savers with smaller accounts. The new rules require brokers to act as so-called fiduciaries that put their clients' best interests first, rather than steering them toward investments with higher fees for the broker. At stake are about $4.5 trillion in 401(k) accounts and more than $7 trillion in IRAs.

  • Utah city defends police use of prescription drug database

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Police did not violate the rights of two firefighters when detectives accessed their prescription records without a warrant during an investigation, Utah authorities argued in a court fight involving prescription-drug databases that are kept in more than 40 states. Utah's database helps curb a growing abuse problem and police didn't need a warrant to use it during the 2013 investigation into ambulance drug thefts, lawyers for the city of Cottonwood Heights contend in court documents. Many states don't require police to get a warrant, and the firefighters said that's unconstitutional. They've asked a federal appeals court to revive their lawsuit against the city.

  • Native American tribe sues federal government over closure of only emergency room on reservation

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) — Native American tribe sues federal government over closure of only emergency room on reservation.

  • Survey suggests slight drop in Michigan wolf population

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    TRAVERSE CITY, Mich. (AP) — The gray wolf population in Michigan's Upper Peninsula appears to have declined slightly in recent years, but state biologists say it's stable and healthy. The Department of Natural Resources estimates the minimum number of wolves at 618, based on survey results announced Thursday. That's down from previous estimates of 636 wolves two years ago and 687 in 2011. But wildlife management specialist Kevin Swanson says when statistical error margins are factored in, the population likely has changed little if at all. The survey is based on track counts and aerial observation of wolves wearing radio tracing collars. Wolves had all but disappeared from Michigan by the 1970s but rebounded aft

  • Colorado House advances late-session roads, schools spending

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    DENVER (AP) — With less than two weeks to go in Colorado's legislative session, the Democrat-led House has advanced a proposal to increase state spending on underfunded roads and schools. A bill sponsored by House Speaker Dickey Lee Hullinghorst would boost that investment by removing a multimillion-dollar Medicaid fund from Colorado's constitutional tax-and-spending limits. It passed by a voice vote Thursday. The House must approve the bill to send it to the Republican-led Senate. Hospital fees pay for the Medicaid fund. By counting it against the voter-approved Taxpayer's Bill of Rights, the fund can help trigger mandatory tax refunds that come into play whenever total state revenues surpass an annual limit.

  • Aetna tops Street 1Q forecasts, hikes 2016 forecast

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    Aetna's first-quarter earnings slid nearly 7 percent as enrollment dipped, but the nation's third-largest health insurer topped Wall Street expectations and hiked its 2016 profit forecast. The Hartford, Connecticut, company also said Thursday that it remains on track to close its roughly $35 billion acquisition of Medicare Advantage coverage provider Humana Inc. in the second half of the year. Aetna booked $65.4 million in pretax costs in the first quarter from that pending acquisition and other deals. The insurer now expects 2016 earnings to range between $7.90 and $8.10 per share, up from its previous forecast for at least $7.75 per share. Analysts expect, on average, earnings of $7.95 per share, according to FactSet.

  • CDC: Teen birth rates plunge, but racial disparities persist

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    NEW YORK (AP) — Birth rates are falling dramatically for black and Hispanic teenagers, but they continue to be much higher than the birth rate for white teens. The Hispanic teen birth rate fell by half over about eight years, and the black teen birth rate dropped nearly that much. But even with those declines, the white teen birth rate is still only half as high, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Thursday. "Despite this historic progress, profound disparities remain," said Bill Albert, chief program officer for the National Campaign to Prevent Teen and Unplanned Pregnancy. The teen birth rate has been falling since 1991, which experts attribute to more teens using birth control and more waiting u

  • Shareholders criticize Pfizer after scrapped Allergan deal

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    Just weeks after the collapse of Pfizer's controversial deal to buy fellow drugmaker Allergan and move its headquarters to Ireland, company executives faced sharp criticism from shareholders at their annual meeting. The record $160 billion deal was structured as an inversion, in which an American multinational company moves its headquarters on paper — but little else — to another country with lower tax rates. Rules issued by the U.S. Treasury Department on April 5 eliminated most of the Allergan deal's financial incentives and forced New York-based Pfizer and Dublin, Ireland-based Allergan to drop their deal the next day. One shareholder accused Pfizer of offering too much for Allergan, given its stock plunge after the de

  • EDITORIAL: Unwanted drugs

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    The amount of out-of-date and unnecessary prescription drugs sitting in people’s homes around the country is staggering, judging by how many get turned in to law enforcement agencies. In an effort to help curb drug abuse by going after supplies, the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency began coordinating National Prescription Drug Take-Back Days in 2010. The effectiveness of these efforts continues to amaze. According to the Kansas Attorney General’s Office, more than 38 tons of unwanted medications have been collected and destroyed in Kansas alone since the program’s inception. “Unused medications are dangerous for kids, pets and the environment,” said AG Derek Schmidt in a press release.

  • Jayhawks ride rocky path to reformation

    Updated: Thu, Apr 28, 2016

    NEW YORK (AP) — To a certain extent, singer-songwriter Gary Louris is fighting against history by reforming the Jayhawks. "The precedent isn't very good as far as bands putting out their best work late in their careers — in rock, it's very rare," said Louris, 61. "That doesn't mean it has to be that way." The Jayhawks try to prove that point with Friday's release of "Paging Mr. Proust," a concise collection of melodic pop-rock with a few twists. The lovely "Quiet Corners & Empty Spaces" stands with the best work ever by the Minneapolis-based group that made an initial impression with early-1990s songs "Blue" and "Waiting for the Sun." No one can accuse the Jayhawks of living off past glory.




Advertisement