• Massachusetts motor vehicle registry site crashes

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    BOSTON (AP) — Talk about a crash: The Massachusetts Registry of Motor Vehicles website went down, making it impossible for drivers to renew licenses and registrations for a time on the typically hectic first day of the month. The Republican of Springfield reported the site crashed Monday morning just as consumers were gearing up to do important transactions online. The Registry blamed unspecified "technical difficulties" for the outage. The outage was resolved and service restored about two hours later. The Registry has been encouraging motorists to do more routine renewals online to save time and ease the crunch on crowded offices.

  • Cyber Monday shoppers give retailers sales bump

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    NEW YORK (AP) — Cyber Monday is turning into Cyber Month. Retailers rolled out discounts and free shipping deals on Cyber Monday, with millions of Americans expected to log on and shop on their work computers, laptops and tablets after the busy holiday shopping weekend. But with retailers extending their online deals into "Cyber Week" and even "Cyber Month," early reports indicated shopping was less robust online on Monday compared with prior years. As of 6 p.m. ET, online sales rose just 8.1 percent compared with last year, according to IBM Digital Analytics. The figures don't take into account the many shoppers who plan to head online after work or in the evening. But a year ago, Cyber Monday sales jumped 20.6 percent, ac

  • Coroner: Exam will look at brain of Ohio St player

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — A neuropathologist will look for signs of traumatic brain injury in an Ohio State athlete who was found dead in a trash bin of an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound and had a reported history of concussions, a coroner said Monday. The examination, not normally part of the autopsy process, is being done on Kosta Karageorge because of that history, said Dr. Anahi Ortiz, the Franklin County coroner. The pathologist "may or may not be able to determine any sort of abnormality or defect from traumatic brain injury," Ortiz said. Preliminary results from a Monday morning autopsy confirmed that Karageorge died of a gunshot wound, Ortiz said, but she hasn't yet definitively ruled it a suicide.

  • Jurors to hear Steve Jobs testimony at Apple trial

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — After nearly a decade in legal wrangling, a billion-dollar class-action lawsuit over Apple's iPod music players heads to trial on Tuesday in a California federal court. A key witness will be none other than the company's legendary late founder Steve Jobs, who will be heard in a videotaped deposition. Attorneys for consumers and electronics retailers claim Apple Inc. used software in its iTunes store that forced would-be song buyers to use iPods instead of cheaper music players made by rivals. The software is no longer used, but the plaintiffs argue that it inflated the prices of millions of iPods sold between 2006 and 2009 — to the tune of $350 million.

  • Congress crams unfinished agenda into final days

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Lame-duck lawmakers returned to Washington on Monday for a two-week session in which they hope to prevent a government shutdown and renew tax breaks for individuals and businesses. But there's not much time to get it all done before the new Congress convenes in January and a Republican takeover is complete. Besides keeping the government running into the new year and extending tax breaks such as those allowing people in states without income taxes to deduct state and local sales taxes, the agenda includes passing a defense policy measure that has passed for more than 50 years in a row. They hope to get it all done in two weeks without stumbling into a government shutdown.

  • Supreme Court considers Facebook threats case

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    WASHINGTON (AP) — From the violent lyrics of rap music to the crude comments of teenagers in video-game chat rooms, the Supreme Court struggled Monday over where to draw the line between free speech and illegal threats in the digital age. The justices considered the case of a Pennsylvania man convicted of posting violent threats on Facebook — in the form of rap lyrics — about killing his estranged wife, shooting up a school and slitting the throat of an FBI agent. Lawyers for Anthony Elonis say he didn't mean to threaten anyone. They contend his posts under the pseudonym "Tone Dougie" were simply a way for him to vent his frustration over splitting up with his wife.

  • Medical marijuana producers set; questions remain

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — Two Twin Cities-area companies will grow and distribute marijuana for Minnesota's medical cannabis program, state officials announced Monday, filling in just one of many blanks as the state gears up to provide the newly legalized treatment. The Minnesota Department of Health chose Minnesota Medical Solutions, or MinnMed, and LeafLine Labs from a field of 12 applicants, ending a weekslong selection process. Both companies are led by local physicians but will collaborate with organizations involved with medical marijuana in other states. LeafLine Labs has strong connections with the Bachman floral family — several members are co-owners.

  • WHO says Liberia, Guinea meeting Ebola targets

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    GENEVA (AP) — Liberia and Guinea have met a Dec. 1 target for isolating 70 percent of people infected with Ebola and safely burying 70 percent of those who die but Sierra Leone has not, the World Health Organization said Monday. Only last week, the U.N. health agency said only Guinea was on track to meet the targets for getting the Ebola outbreak under control in the three hardest-hit West African countries. But at a news conference in Geneva, WHO's Dr. Bruce Aylward said the organization had revised its conclusion based on more analysis of its data. Sierra Leone also probably met the targets in the west of the country, he said, and likely will improve to the 70 percent target nationwide "in the coming weeks.

  • South African AIDS group says treatment stalling

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    JOHANNESBURG (AP) — In T-shirts boldly declaring "HIV Positive," members of the Treatment Action Campaign marked the 10th anniversary of their court victory that brought the South African government to provide drugs to AIDS patients, in Johannesburg on Monday. Commemorating World Aids Day, the group called it a reunion rather than a celebration as speaker after speaker remembered how life had changed since 2004 now that 2.7 million HIV-positive South Africans receive free treatment. The group refused to join a much larger gathering organized by the South African government and the National AIDS Council in another part of the country.

  • Ethiopia tests thousands for HIV in record attempt

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    ADDIS ABABA, Ethiopia (AP) — More than 3,300 people were tested for HIV Sunday in the Ethiopian region of Gambella, a massive turnout that exceeded expectations among AIDS campaigners who had hoped to test 2,000 people, according to local officials. Rahel Gettu, an official with the U.N. Aids agency in Ethiopia, said they believe they broke the world record for the number of HIV tests carried out in one day. She said their claim was yet to be verified and confirmed by Guinness World Records. She said 3,383 people were tested for HIV within eight hours in a single event ahead of World Aids Day. Eighty-two of them received positive results. About 6.5 percent of Gambella residents have HIV or AIDS, a rate higher than the

  • Correction: Ebola-West Africa story

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — In a story Nov. 26 about the Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, The Associated Press reported erroneously the name of a doctor infected with Ebola. He is Komba Songu-M'briwa, not Songo Mbriwa. A corrected version of the story is below: Sierra Leone official: Ebola may have reached peak Ebola in Sierra Leone may have reached peak, says minister, as another doctor infected CLARENCE ROY-MACAULAY and PAUL SCHEMM Associated Press FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — The Ebola outbreak in Sierra Leone, which has been surging in recent weeks, may have reached its peak and could be on the verge of slowing down, Sierra Leone's information minister said Wednesday.

  • World AIDS Day screenings offered in Vegas area

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Health officials in Las Vegas are marking World AIDS Day with free HIV testing at several locations. The Southern Nevada Health District says its sexual health clinic at 400 Shadow Lane will offer testing on Monday until 4:30 p.m. Testing at the Gay & Lesbian Center of Southern Nevada at 401 South Maryland Pkwy will be from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., and 1:30 p.m. to 5 p.m. The Gay & Lesbian Center is hosting a 5:30 p.m. reception, a panel discussion, an inspirational service, a candlelight vigil and a 9 p.m. screening of the film, The Normal Heart. The health district says more than 3,500 people are living with HIV in southern Nevada, and there are more than 2,800 AIDS cases locally.

  • Climate funds for coal highlight lack of UN rules

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    KANCI KULON, Indonesia (AP) — About $1 billion in loans under a U.N. initiative for poor countries to tackle global warming is going toward the construction of power plants fired by coal, the biggest human source of carbon pollution. Japan gave the money to help its companies build three such plants in Indonesia and listed it with the United Nations as climate finance, The Associated Press has found. Japan says these plants burn coal more efficiently and are therefore cleaner than old coal plants. However, they still emit twice as much heat-trapping carbon dioxide as plants running on natural gas. Villagers near the Cirebon plant in Indonesia also complain that stocks of shrimp, fish and green mussels have dwindled.

  • Healthy roast for the holidays? With pork, easily

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    Winter calls for savory roasts that fill our homes with luscious aromas that promise a comforting meal to bring the family together. The problem for the healthy eater is that most roasts get their flavor from silky (and so very saturated) fat marbling. Yes, we can roast chickens and turkeys, but sometimes we crave thick slices of pork or beef. I have a solution: the pork tenderloin (not to be confused with a simple pork loin). As the name suggests, this is one of the most tender cuts of pork, making it perfect for roasted slice-and-serve bliss. The pork tenderloin is a small roast (about 1 to 2 pounds per roast), which also means it cooks quickly, adding to its weekday convenience.

  • Proposed sale price of Missoula hospital to $75M

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    MISSOULA, Mont. (AP) — An analysis of the proposed sale of Community Medical Center in Missoula has increased the price by more than $7 million to nearly $75 million. The board of directors of the nonprofit hospital announced in September that it had agreed to sell its assets to a partnership between Billings Clinic and RegionalCare Hospital Partners for $67.4 million. The proposed sale must be approved by the attorney general's office. The state hired a business valuation firm, which set the fair market value of the hospital's assets at between $67 million and $75 million. The attorney general's office is expected to make a decision by the end of the year.

  • Security firm: Team targets email for stock info

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    The cybersecurity company FireEye has unearthed a team of email intruders that snoop through the correspondence of company executives who may possess market-moving information. FireEye said the team has carried out attacks against nearly 100 publicly traded companies or their advisory firms in possible attempts to play the stock market. Most of the targets are health care or pharmaceutical companies. It noted that the shares of those firms can move dramatically after the announcement of clinical trial results, regulatory decisions or other significant developments. FireEye has labeled the group FIN4 and says it focuses on capturing usernames and passwords to email accounts, which gives the group access to private email corres

  • Naked man who fell through ceiling to be evaluated

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    BOSTON (AP) — A man who police say fell naked through the ceiling of a women's bathroom at Boston's airport and then assaulted an elderly man has agreed to get a mental health evaluation. Cameron Shenk is charged with attempted murder, assault and lewd and lascivious conduct in the Nov. 22 incident at Logan International Airport. A dangerousness hearing scheduled for Monday was canceled after Shenk agreed to undergo a mental health evaluation. Police say the 26-year-old Shenk sneaked into the bathroom, undressed inside a stall and climbed into the ceiling crawl space. He fell through the ceiling, fled the bathroom and allegedly assaulted an 84-year-old man.

  • Chinese gay dating app grows to 15 million users

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    BEIJING (AP) — By day, Ma Baoli was a high-ranking officer in a seaside city police force. By night, he ran a website for gay people to share experiences and on which he spoke under a pseudonym about the pressure he faced as a homosexual. After several years, the police force found out and told him he could not run a private website that was earning money from advertisements while serving as a police officer. Ma chose his website, a move that later proved fruitful. His Danlan.org has spawned a Chinese-language dating app for men called Blued that has garnered 15 million users, 3 million of them outside China, over two years. And last month, his company, Blue City, received $30 million in funding from Silicon Valley ve

  • U.Va. receives grant for seizure drug trial

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    CHARLOTTESVILLE, Va. (AP) — University of Virginia researchers have received more than $21 million in grant funding to conduct a clinical trial of three seizure drugs. The drugs are commonly used to treat a potentially deadly prolonged seizure called status epilepticus. The university said Monday in a news release that the five-year trial's goal is to determine which drug is best to use. Researchers also want to determine each drug's side effects. Forty hospitals will participate in the trial. Dr. Jaiden Kapur with the U.Va. Department of Neurology is leading the team of researchers. They plan to evaluate up to 795 patients treated with one of the drugs. The National Institutes of Neurological Disorders an

  • Supreme Court rejects blood transfusion case

    Updated: Mon, Dec 1, 2014

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court won't hear an appeal from the estate of a Michigan woman who died following a kidney transplant after turning down a blood transfusion because of her religious beliefs. The justices on Monday let stand a state appeals court ruling that said the estate of Gwendolyn Rozier could not sue her doctors for negligence. Rozier received a kidney from her daughter in a 2007 surgery but doctors later found that her body was rejecting the organ. She refused a blood transfusion, in keeping with the beliefs of Jehovah's Witnesses. Rozier's estate accused the doctors of failing to timely recognize internal bleeding, among other allegations, which would have eliminated the need for a transfusion.