• Your BIZ for Aug. 2

    Updated: Sun, Aug 2, 2015

    MCR’s cardiovascular program meets highest standards Two national organizations have recognized Medical Center of the Rockies for providing the highest standard of care for heart attack patients. The American Heart Association and the American College of Cardiology recently honored MCR with two of their highest awards for providing an exceptional system of care — from the 911 response to follow-up care — for heart attack patients, according to a news release. The cardiovascular program at Medical Center of the Rockies in Loveland was recently honored with the American Heart Association’s Mission: Lifeline Heart Attack Receiving Center - Gold Plus recognition and the American College of Cardiology’s NCDR ACTION

  • Cyclist stays healthy, competitive on his Italian Masi touring bike

    Updated: Sun, Aug 2, 2015

    Bill Grey rides his bicycle as much as 12,000 miles a year to assure that his heart is in tiptop shape. Along the way, the 46-year-old Pueblo physical therapist has become an elite competitive racer with several top finishes on his 22-speed Italian Masi touring bike. Grey rides every day, whether it’s biking to work in the city from his home in Pueblo West or rising for an early morning workout. The effort at maximum physical fitness, Grey says, is because he comes from a family with a “horrific heart history.” “My father was 50 when he needed to undergo quadruple bypass surgery. A brother also needed a quadruple bypass and another brother required stents,” he said. “I’m trying not to have the same t

  • A look at Hillary Clinton's medical background

    Updated: Sat, Aug 1, 2015

    Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton has released a letter from her doctor that declared her to be in "excellent physical condition and fit to serve as president of the United States." She is the first candidate for president in 2016 to release detailed information about her personal health. A closer look: ___ OVERALL PROGNOSIS Clinton is a "healthy 67-year-old female whose current medical conditions include hypothyroidism and seasonal pollen allergies," wrote Dr. Lisa Bardack, an internist who practices near Clinton's suburban New York home.

  • At a Glance: A look at Hillary Clinton's medical background

    Updated: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton released a letter from her doctor Friday that declared her to be in "excellent physical condition and fit to serve as president of the United States." Clinton is the first candidate for president in 2016 to release detailed information about her personal health. A closer look at those details. ___ OVERALL PROGNOSIS Clinton is a "healthy 67-year-old female whose current medical conditions include hypothyroidism and seasonal pollen allergies," wrote Dr. Lisa Bardack, an internist who practices near Clinton's suburban New York home.

  • Clinton releases tax, health records on busy Friday

    Updated: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Rodham Clinton and her husband paid close to $44 million in federal taxes since 2007 and she is "excellent physical condition" — two facts that emerged Friday in a flood of disclosures about the Democratic presidential candidate pushed out by her campaign on a busy summer day. Within a three-hour period, the State Department made public more than 2,200 pages of emails sent from Clinton's personal account, her campaign released a letter from her personal doctor about her health and she unveiled eight years of tax returns. Meanwhile, Clinton herself was campaigning at the annual meeting of the National Urban League and calling for an end of the nation's trade embargo of Cuba during a speech in Miami.

  • Clinton's doctor says 2016 candidate in 'excellent' health

    Updated: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Rodham Clinton's physician said Friday that the Democratic presidential candidate is in "excellent physical condition" and has completely recovered from the effects of a concussion she suffered in 2012, pronouncing her "fit to serve as president of the United States." Clinton is the first 2016 presidential candidate to release her health records. The details came in a two-page letter from Dr. Lisa Bardack, an internist and chairman of the department of medicine at the Mount Kisco Medical Group near Clinton's suburban New York home. Clinton sustained the concussion in December 2012 after fainting, which Bardack attributed to stomach virus and dehydration.

  • Cardiologist details troubles at Chicago-area VA hospital

    Updated: Fri, Jul 31, 2015

    CHICAGO (AP) — A cardiologist who worked at a Chicago-area Veterans Affairs hospital says the facility had a yearlong backlog of unread heart tests. Lisa Nee testified Thursday at a Senate hearing on claims against the Department of Veterans Affairs. U.S. Sen. Mark Kirk of Illinois chaired the Senate subcommittee hearing. Nee worked at Hines Veterans Affairs Hospital in Maywood from 2011 to 2013. She told lawmakers her "shock turned to horror" when she realized some veterans suffered complications or died after the echocardiograms but before they were interpreted. The Chicago Tribune reports (http://trib.in/1DVHNFJ ) that Nee said she complained to the VA's Office of Inspector General about the test backlog.

  • Records: Money dispute led to murder/suicide

    Updated: Thu, Jul 30, 2015

    Money was at the heart of a bitter dispute between Dr. Suresh Gadasalli and Ayyasamy Thangam before Thangam shot Gadasalli to death June 11 at the Healthy Heart Center, according to police records requested by the Odessa American. Text messages between Gadasalli, Thangam and his wife Shanthi Thangam, and Dr. Sudhir Srivastava reveal that Gadasalli threatened to sue the Thangams for defamation of character after they requested money back on a failed investment, according to the police report. A dispute resulted in a $200,000 settlement, according to the records, ultimately leading Shanthi Thangam to further contact Gadasalli fearing for her husband’s life and mental state.

  • Make a Healthy Heart a Top Priority

    Updated: Mon, Jul 27, 2015

    Let’s be honest; many of us aren’t excited about going to the doctor. There is an underlying fear that there may actually be something wrong. However, it’s so much better if we know of a health issue early on, so it can be treated properly. That’s why we get mammograms and colonoscopies, but heart disease is more common in women than breast cancer making it incredibly important that we also screen for heart disease. Dr. Raja Naidu, a graduate of Permian High School, is a fellowship trained cardiologist in Odessa who has been practicing here since 2002. Dr. Naidu comes highly recommended with a stellar reputation winning several awards including the Patients’ Choice award and Compassionate Doctor Recognition in 2014. Dr.

  • APPetizers: Monster Heart Medic aims to teach kids about cardiovascular health

    Updated: Mon, Jul 27, 2015

    Monster Heart Medic is a game aimed at ages 10-13 designed to teach children about the heart and ways to live a heart-healthy lifestyle. NAME: Monster Heart Medic WHAT IT DOES: Children learn how to maintain a healthy heart with this informative game. HOW MUCH: Free COMPATIBLE WITH: Apple and Android phones and tablets WHAT’S GOOD: Designed by the University of California, Berkeley’s Lawrence Hall of Science, this animated educational game for ages 10 to 13 explores the cardiovascular system and how it is affected by activities and eating habits. Through an interactive narrative (in either English or Spanish), players help Ragnar, a friendly monster, discover why he has trouble training for a marathon.

  • Donation pays for new van to carry pediatric care team

    Updated: Mon, Jul 27, 2015

    LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP) — A gift from the Daniel Pitino Foundation has paid for a new vehicle that will carry a group of University of Louisville physicians around the state to treat children with heart problems. The nearly $57,000 gift paid for the new van, which will travel to eight sites from Ashland to Paducah. The pediatric cardiology team serves up to 50 patients a day. The UofL Physicians group says the van makes it possible for kids to get the care they need without having to travel to Louisville. The Daniel Pitino Foundation was founded by Louisville coach Rick Pitino and his wife, JoAnne, to honor the memory of their infant son, Daniel, who died of a congenital heart condition in 1987.

  • FDA OKs breakthrough cholesterol drug for high-risk patients

    Updated: Fri, Jul 24, 2015

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The Food and Drug Administration on Friday approved a first-of-a-kind drug that lowers artery-clogging cholesterol more than older drugs that have been prescribed for decades. The drug from Sanofi and Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc. offers an important new option for millions of patients at high risk of heart disease. But the drug's sky-high price tag — $14,600 per year — is certain to escalate debate about the cost of breakthrough drugs and who should take them. Praluent is the first in a new class of biotech medications that use a novel approach to lower bad, or LDL, cholesterol.

  • Mercy EMS receives American Heart Association recognition

    Updated: Fri, Jul 24, 2015

    Mercy Emergency Medical Services has received the American Heart Association’s Mission: Lifeline EMS Bronze Award for implementing quality improvement measures for the treatment of patients who experience severe heart attacks. “Mercy is committed to heart care in our community, and we are proud of our EMS team for earning this recognition,” said Lori Wightman, president of Mercy Hospital Ada. “We continue to work with our EMS team and our community to make sure the proper equipment (AEDs, Lucas Devices, etc.) is provided for emergency responses, yet the training, expertise and responsiveness of the EMS team is the most important aspect of emergency care.

  • Vitamin D linked to healthy immune response to HIV, study says

    Updated: Fri, Jul 24, 2015

    Already commonly prescribed for elderly men and women to keep their bones strong, vitamin D supplements also could be an easy and affordable way to fight serious infections like HIV, according to a recent study led by a Penn State anthropology professor. Nina Jablonski, whose research includes skin pigmentation and vitamin D, launched the project and enlisted South African researchers and 100 young adults in Cape Town to study how levels of ultraviolet B radiation, vitamin D in the diet, genetics and skin pigment affect vitamin D in the blood. At the same time they tested whether vitamin D supplements could reverse deficiency and improve resistance to HIV. Results were published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy

  • Two heart transplants not slowing teen down

    Updated: Fri, Jul 24, 2015

    Ryan Brown refuses to let his medical challenges limit the possibilities of his future. “You have scientists and statistics that say it’s very rare to get a second transplant, and it is,” Brown said. “But it’s very rare to be not normal, and being not normal — whether you’re autistic, or you have ADHD, or any problem; yeah, its a crutch sometimes. I do push it to the limit — it should also motivate you, uplift you to say ‘I might as well show everybody else what I can do.’” The 18-year-old Hammond, Ind.

  • Oklahoma ranks No. 2 in U.S. for heart disease deaths

    Updated: Wed, Jul 22, 2015

    Oklahoma has the second highest rate in the nation of residents dying from heart disease, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report. The state saw 228 deaths per 100,000 people. Only Mississippi had a higher rate, with 240 heart disease deaths per 100,000 people. In 2013, a total of 9,721 Oklahoma residents died because of heart disease. In January, Gov. Mary Fallin highlighted in her inaugural address how serious this issue is in Oklahoma: One of the big indicators of overall health - because it is so closely linked to smoking, obesity, and nutrition - is prevalence of heart disease. Let's set an aggressive goal: to reduce heart disease deaths in Oklahoma by 25 percent between now and 2025.

  • Oklahoma ranks No. 2 in U.S. for heart disease deaths

    Jaclyn Cosgrove | Updated: Wed, Jul 22, 2015

    Oklahoma has the second highest rate in the nation of residents dying from heart disease, according to a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report.  The state saw 228 deaths per 100,000 people. Only Mississippi had a higher rate, with 240 heart disease deaths per 100,000 people.  In 2013, a total of 9,721 Oklahoma residents died because of heart disease.  In January, Gov. Mary Fallin highlighted in her inaugural address how serious this issue is in Oklahoma: One of the big indicators of overall health - because it is so closely linked to smoking, obesity, and nutrition - is prevalence of heart disease. Let's set an aggressive goal: to reduce heart disease deaths in Oklahoma by 25

  • St. Jude Medical adds more heart devices in $3.4B buy

    Updated: Wed, Jul 22, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — St. Jude Medical will spend $3.4 billion in cash to acquire Thoratec, further bulking up its array of devices that are used to treat heart conditions. Heart failure devices have become pivotal for the St. Paul, Minnesota company since the Food and Drug Administration approved its remote patient monitoring system CardioMems HF last year. Thoratec's key product is an implantable device that helps patients' hearts pump more blood. About 5.8 million people in the U.S. have heart failure, in which the heart cannot pump enough blood to meet the body's oxygen needs, and St. Jude is positioning itself to satisfy the need for better technology. St. Jude will pay $63.50 for Thoratec Corp., a 30 percent pre

  • Europe approves Amgen’s new cholesterol-lowering drug

    Updated: Tue, Jul 21, 2015

    LOS ANGELES — Biotech giant Amgen Inc. received the approval of European regulators for a new drug the company said is highly effective at reducing “bad” cholesterol, which is a significant risk factor for heart disease. The European Commission’s approval of the drug Repatha creates an important new option for patients who had not been able to reduce cholesterol with existing medications, said the company, based west of Los Angeles in Thousand Oaks. Repatha is an antibody that is injected into patients one or two times per month and can reduce low density lipoprotein, or LDL, by 50 percent or more. “Repatha addresses the No. 1 killer of humans on the planet,” said Sean Harper, executive vice president of res

  • Europe approves Amgen's first-in-class cholesterol drug

    Updated: Tue, Jul 21, 2015

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Amgen on Tuesday received European approval for its first-of-a-kind cholesterol drug that lowers levels of the artery-clogging substance more than older drugs that have been prescribed for decades. The highly-anticipated decision introduces a new option for patients at risk for heart disease. But questions remain about the drug's price — estimated by one analyst at about $3,750 per year outside the U.S. — and its ability to reduce heart attack and death in the long term. The European Commission cleared Repatha for patients with dangerously high cholesterol levels, including those with inherited conditions that drive up levels of the wax-like substance.




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