• Young at heart? Not most Americans, government report says

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Your heart might be older than you are. A new government report suggests age is just a number — and perhaps not a very telling one when it comes to your risk of heart attack or stroke. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report takes a new approach to try to spur more Americans to take steps to prevent cardiovascular disease. CDC scientists estimated the average "heart age" of men and women in every state, based on risk factors like high blood pressure, obesity, and whether they smoke or have diabetes. Then it compared the numbers to average actual ages. The results? Nearly three out of four U.S. adults have a heart that's older than the rest of their body, according to CDC calculations.

  • Heart-Attack Patients More Likely To Die After Ambulances Are Diverted

    Yesterday

    Heart-attack patients whose ambulances were diverted from crowded emergency rooms to hospitals farther away were more likely to be dead a year later than patients who weren’t diverted, according to a recent study published in the journal Health Affairs. The study, conducted by researchers at the University of California-San Francisco and the National Bureau of Economic Research, looked at ambulance diversions affecting nearly 30,000 Medicare patients in 26 California counties from 2001 to 2011. The study adds to a growing body of research nationally showing that temporary diversions of ambulances from the nearest hospital can harm patients with life-threatening conditions, including heart attacks and stroke.

  • As testosterone therapy gains popularity, medical controversy increases

    Updated: Sat, Aug 29, 2015

    For the millions of men who’ve been taking testosterone — and the millions more who’ve probably been thinking about it — there’s some good news and some not-so-good news. New research this month from the Kansas City VA Medical Center and Harvard Medical School found that this powerful male hormone may not raise risks of heart disease, as some previous studies had suggested. The bad news: Supplemental testosterone may not deliver on the promise of that extra pep and reinvigorated sex life that led many aging baby boomers to take the stuff in the first place. Consider these the latest rounds in the expanding medical controversy over the incredible increase in testosterone therapy.

  • Amgen wins approval for second biotech cholesterol drug

    Updated: Thu, Aug 27, 2015

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Amgen Inc. has won federal approval for the second medicine in a new class of pricey biotech drugs that reduce artery-clogging cholesterol more than older statin drugs that have been used for decades. The drug Repatha could eventually help millions of Americans who face increased risks of heart disease because they cannot control their cholesterol with existing drugs and methods. But concerns about the medication's price tag — $14,100 per year — and long-term benefits will likely limit its use in the near-term.

  • Cholesterol Drug Amgen

    Updated: Thu, Aug 27, 2015

    This undated image provided by Amgen Inc. shows Repatha. Amgen Inc. has won federal approval for the second medicine in a new class of pricey biotech drugs that reduce artery-clogging cholesterol more than older statin drugs that have been used for decades. The Food and Drug Administration approved the drug Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015, for two groups of patients who are unable to control their cholesterol with existing drugs and treatments. (Amgen Inc.

  • Compton ends season early at Barclays

    Updated: Thu, Aug 27, 2015

    EDISON, N.J. (AP) — Erik Compton ended his season Thursday when he withdrew from The Barclays after eighth hole with a respiratory infection. Compton, who already has gone through two heart transplants, was No. 122 in the FedEx Cup and would have needed a strong week to move into the top 100 and advance to the next playoff event at the TPC Boston. Last week at the Wyndham Championship, the 35-year-old Compton opened with a career-low 62 but had to withdraw before the third round because of gout. He spent last week at home in Miami and developed a respiratory infection, and didn't decide to show up in New Jersey until Wednesday night to give it a shot. "I felt like I walked out of the emergency room and teed it up," he

  • Taking self-control of heart health

    Updated: Wed, Aug 26, 2015

    Medical Center celebrates re-accreditation with community fair Listening to and following your heart isn't just good advice for emotional decisions anymore. The Medical Center of Southeast Texas staff said the best way to prevent heart disease and stroke is to "take control of your own heart health" by getting to know the ins and outs of the body's circulatory pump. "The key to heart health is prevention," Katie Celli, Medical Center of Southeast Texas director of marketing and public relations, said Wednesday. "We are the only acute center in Mid- and South Jefferson County with a complete, comprehensive cardiovascular program. "We feel we're the one-stop shop for heart health in our community. But we can't do th

  • Former New Hampshire governor recovers from surgery

    Updated: Mon, Aug 24, 2015

    HAMPTON FALLS, N.H. (AP) — Former New Hampshire Gov. John H. Sununu is recovering after quadruple bypass surgery. According to his office, the 76-year-old Republican was admitted to St. Elizabeth's Medical Center in Boston on Thursday for a coronary angioplasty procedure. After further examination revealed significant blockage of his arteries, he underwent surgery the next day. His office says Sununu is recovering well and expects to return home to Hampton Falls within the week. Sununu was elected governor in 1982 and served three terms. He also served as chief of staff to former President George H.W. Bush.

  • Death of Harris County jailer, 26, blamed on heart disease

    Updated: Fri, Aug 21, 2015

    HOUSTON (AP) — A coroner says a Harris County Sheriff's Office jailer who collapsed following an altercation with an inmate died of natural causes. The Harris County Institute for Forensic Sciences said Friday that 26-year-old Officer Tronoski Jones died of heart disease. The Houston Chronicle (http://bit.ly/1LnSeae ) reports preliminary autopsy results indicate Jones had atherosclerotic and hypertensive cardiovascular disease. Jones on Thursday was helping move an inmate from one part of the jail to another when the prisoner became argumentative and combative. Sheriff Ron Hickman says there was some type of "contact" with Jones and he fell to the floor. A jail doctor immediately tended to Jones, who had no outw

  • Diabetes drug shows 1st protection from heart complications

    Updated: Thu, Aug 20, 2015

    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — For the first time, there's evidence that a diabetes medication, Jardiance, reduces risk of the complications that are the top killer of diabetics: heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular damage. Preventing those is a long-elusive goal for the millions of diabetes patients and their doctors, and one analyst who's also a trained physician even called Thursday's news of a possible groundbreaking advance a "holy grail." Analysts are predicting a windfall for the makers of Jardiance, anticipating a big shift in which diabetes drugs doctors prescribe most. U.S. investors liked the news, too, driving up Lilly shares more than 5 percent. Jardiance, a once-a-day pill, was approved in the U.S.

  • Diabetes drug shows 1st protection from heart complications

    Updated: Thu, Aug 20, 2015

    TRENTON, N.J. (AP) — For the first time, there's evidence that a diabetes medication, Jardiance, reduces risk of the complications that are the top killer of diabetics: heart attacks, strokes and other cardiovascular damage. Preventing those is a long-elusive goal for the millions of diabetes patients and their doctors, and one analyst who's also a trained physician even called Thursday's news of a possible groundbreaking advance a "holy grail." Analysts are predicting a windfall for the makers of Jardiance, anticipating a big shift in which diabetes drugs doctors prescribe most. U.S. investors liked the news, too, driving up Lilly shares more than 5 percent. Jardiance, a once-a-day pill, was approved in the U.S.

  • Giving back UTPB instructor wins prestigious award

    Updated: Thu, Aug 20, 2015

    Being a lecturer in management and director of the Roden Entrepreneurial Development Center at University of Texas of the Permian Basin is Michael Crain’s way of giving back and now the UT System returned the favor with the 2015 Regents’ Outstanding Teaching Award. Living in Arizona 14 years ago, Crain had a heart transplant, which he said changed his outlook on life. His donor was working toward a degree in information management, so Crain decided to earn his bachelor’s and master’s degrees, earning as many awards as possible along the way. He received a bachelor’s degree in information technology from the University of Phoenix and a master’s in information management from Arizona State University.

  • Scientists suggest a way to lower stroke risk: Shorten your workweek

    Updated: Wed, Aug 19, 2015

    Do you worry that your workaholic ways are killing you? A new study says you may be right. In an analysis of more than half a million men and women from around the world, those who put in long hours at the office were 33 percent more likely to suffer a stroke than their colleagues who clocked out earlier. Even those who worked just over 40 hours per week saw a significant increase in stroke risk, according to results published online Wednesday in the journal Lancet. An international team of researchers gathered data on hundreds of thousands of workers in the U.S., Australia, Israel and eight countries in Europe who participated in various long-term studies. The volunteers told researchers how many hours they worked per week.

  • Prep football player's death attributed to cardiac condition

    Updated: Wed, Aug 19, 2015

    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Authorities say the death of a north Philadelphia prep school football player who collapsed during a workout was due to natural causes stemming from a cardiac condition. The Philadelphia medical examiner's office said Wednesday that 15-year-old Ryan Gillyard of Upper Darby died of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, a condition that causes thickening of the heart muscle. St. Joseph's Prep officials said the freshman collapsed shortly after warmups April 18 at the school's practice field. He was rushed to Temple University Hospital, where he was pronounced dead. Officials said Gillyard played for the team as a linebacker and running back and also played basketball at St. Denis Catholic school in Havertown.

  • Prosecutor: Dallas-Houston rivalry at heart of Texas cancer agency exec's case

    Updated: Wed, Aug 19, 2015

    AUSTIN — A Travis County prosecutor says a former official at the state’s cancer-fighting agency deceptively sabotaged an intra-office rival’s pet project — ushering it to a final approval but only after omitting steps that later blew up the deal. Intricate charges and denials dominated Tuesday’s opening of the trial of former Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas executive Jerald “Jerry” Cobbs. Cobbs, 64, stood and told jurors he pleaded not guilty to a first-degree felony charge of securing execution of a document by deception.

  • Left-ventricular devices prove helpful for heart-failure patients

    Updated: Thu, Aug 13, 2015

    ROCHESTER, Minn. — Mayo Clinic has announced results of a study on the effectiveness of left-ventricular assist devices (LVAD) in treating patients with a form of cardiomyopathy called restrictive cardiomyopathy (RCM). The Mayo Clinic study, which is the largest study of its kind to date, demonstrates that LVAD devices are a viable and accessible option for treating patients with RCM, who would otherwise see their health deteriorate or possibly face death. The study suggests criteria that clinicians can use for successful implementation of these devices in RCM. Approximately 500,000 people are currently living with cardiomyopathy, which is a condition that affects the muscles in the heart.

  • Want to live longer and be healthier? Stand up

    Updated: Thu, Aug 13, 2015

    Upper back pain and Mary Anne Lide used to be wary companions. They palled around at work; they hung out at home. Tylenol and Advil might separate them temporarily, but never completely, and rarely long enough. Then Lide, 54, a coordinator with the Richards Group in Dallas, made a simple change. The difference between life now and then, she says, “is huge.” Her posture is better. Her legs are stronger. She’s in a better mood. She has more energy. She’s more outgoing. She can’t even remember the last time her back hurt. To what does Lide owe her newfound self? Pills? Surgery? Hard-core exercise? No, instead, what she began doing is almost embarrassing in its simplicity: Standing.

  • For men on testosterone therapy, some good news and bad

    Updated: Tue, Aug 11, 2015

    New research offers both reassurance and disappointing news to men who take testosterone supplements to improve their energy levels, libido and general health: The popular therapy does not appear to hasten progression of cardiovascular disease; neither, however, does it appear to improve sexual function or overall health-related quality of life. The new trial results counter the findings of a welter of recent studies that has linked testosterone supplementation to an increased risk of heart attacks and strokes. At the same time, they suggest that the roughly 3 percent of American men over 40 taking prescription testosterone supplements may be getting little benefit for the $1.6 billion spent annually on those treatments.

  • Hysterectomy may indicate cardiovascular risk in women under age 50

    Updated: Mon, Aug 10, 2015

    ROCHESTER, Minn. — Hysterectomy may be a marker of early cardiovascular risk and disease, especially in women under 35, according to Mayo Clinic experts. In a study recently published in Menopause: The Journal of the North American Menopause Society, researchers found that women who underwent hysterectomy were much more likely to have pre-existing cardiovascular risk factors — especially obesity — than women of the same age in the control group who did not undergo hysterectomy. In particular, women under age 35 had the most cardiovascular risk factors and disease, including stroke.

  • Hutch cyclist still riding 10 years after heart transplant

    Updated: Sat, Aug 8, 2015

    A decade ago, John Fairbanks of Hutchinson was recovering from a heart transplant in Salt Lake City, Utah. On Saturday, he did what he has done so many times – before and since the life-saving procedure – cycling competitively. Fairbanks entered the Salty Dog Triathlon with his daughter, Jessica, and one of her friends, Theo Adams. They finished seventh overall out of 250 entries, third out of 25 team entries and second in their category, only 10 seconds behind first place in the hour-plus race. Fairbanks finished the 10.5-mile cycling leg of the triathlon in about half an hour. Afterward he said he wasn’t in as good of shape as he wanted to be, because he could find “only” six hours a week to train when he would pr




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