• Know your health history

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    Hair and eye color runs in the family, but so do common diseases like cancer and heart disease, as well as uncommon ones like cystic fibrosis. Do you know your family’s health history? According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 96 percent of Americans think it is important to know their family history, but less than one-third of Americans have even attempted to compile a written family health history. Family members share their genes, as well as their environment, lifestyles and habits. A family history helps identify people at increased risk for disease because it reflects both a person’s genes and these other shared risk factors.

  • AP-KS--Kansas News Digest midnight, KS

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    Hello! Here's a look at how AP's general news coverage is shaping up in Kansas. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP-Kansas City bureau at 816-421-4844 or apkansascity@ap.org. Margaret Stafford is on the desk. A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date. All times are Central. Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

  • AP-IL--Illinois News Digest 12am, IL

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    Here's a look at AP's general news coverage at 12a.m. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP-Chicago bureau at 312-781-0500 or chifax@ap.org. Caryn Rousseau is on the desk. AP-Illinois News Editor Hugh Dellios can be reached at 312-920-3624 or hdellios@ap.org. A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date. All times are Central. Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

  • Sedgwick County Zoo elephant Cinda died of age-related heart disease, tests show

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    Cinda, a Sedgwick County Zoo elephant, died of chronic age-related heart disease, tests have confirmed. Pathology reports from two different labs showed evidence of lesions in Cinda’s heart due to heart disease brought on by her age, the zoo’s associate veterinarian Sandy Wilson said Wednesday. Cinda was 43 when she died Nov. 5. Her death surprised zookeepers, because she “seemed to be particularly happy in her last days,” Wilson said. Cinda had experienced some “vague nonspecific symptoms” such as edema in her abdomen, but she was eating and behaving normally. Wilson said veterinarians have never diagnosed a case of heart disease in a live elephant.

  • AP-GA--Georgia News Digest 8:15 pm, GA

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    Hello! Here's a look at how AP's general news coverage is shaping up today in Georgia. Questions about today's coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the Atlanta AP Bureau at 404-522-8971 or apatlanta@ap.org. News Editor Jim Van Anglen can be reached at 1-800-821-3737 or jvananglen@ap.org. A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date. Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

  • AP-KS--Kansas News Digest 5 pm, KS

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    Hello! Here's a look at how AP's general news coverage is shaping up in Kansas. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP-Kansas City bureau at 816-421-4844 or apkansascity@ap.org. Heather Hollingsworth is on the desk. A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date. All times are Central. Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates. NEW & UPDATED: — CONGRESS-KEYSTONE. Updated. — PIPELINE SPILLS-

  • BC-IL--Illinois News Digest 6pm, IL

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    Here's a look at AP's general news coverage at 6 p.m. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP-Chicago bureau at 312-781-0500 or chifax@ap.org. Herbert McCann is on the desk. AP-Illinois News Editor Hugh Dellios can be reached at 312-920-3624 or hdellios@ap.org. A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date. All times are Central. Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

  • AP-IL--Illinois News Digest 1:30 pm, IL

    Updated: 13 hr ago

    Here's a look at AP's general news coverage at 1:30 p.m. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP-Chicago bureau at 312-781-0500 or chifax@ap.org. Herbert McCann is on the desk. AP-Illinois News Editor Hugh Dellios can be reached at 312-920-3624 or hdellios@ap.org. A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date. All times are Central. Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

  • BC-KS--Kansas News Digest 1 pm, KS

    Updated: 13 hr ago

    Hello! Here's a look at how AP's general news coverage is shaping up in Kansas. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP-Kansas City bureau at 816-421-4844 or apkansascity@ap.org. Heather Hollingsworth is on the desk. A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date. All times are Central. Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

  • Black breast-feeding gatherings battle troubling health gaps

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    MILWAUKEE (AP) — Low rates for breast-feeding may contribute to health gaps facing U.S. blacks, but in several cities grassroots groups are aiming to change that. The Milwaukee-based African American Breastfeeding Network is one, and it recently got recognition from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The group's monthly gatherings encourage moms to breast-feed while sharing tips and learning strategies for beating barriers that keep them from nursing. That includes sometimes absent partners and employers who don't allow workplace breast-feeding. Benefits include less infant mortality, asthma, Type 2 diabetes and obesity — which all disproportionately affect black children.

  • Sedgwick County elephant died of heart disease

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    WICHITA, Kan. (AP) — Tests show that an elephant at the Sedgwick County Zoo died of age-related heart disease. The zoo's associate veterinarian, Sandy Wilson, said Wednesday that pathology tests showed the elephant, called Cinda, had heart disease. She was 43 when she died Nov. 5. The Wichita Eagle reports (http://bit.ly/1yEmK6n ) the zoo was surprised by Cinda's death because she had shown few symptoms and was eating and behaving normally at the time. Cinda arrived with another elephant, Stephanie, from South Africa in 1972, a year after the zoo opened. Stephanie is now the zoo's only elephant. The zoo is raising money to build a $10.3 million zoo exhibit and bring more elephants to Wichita by the time th

  • Citizens hosts health screening event Feb. 4

    Updated: Wed, Jan 28, 2015

    Citizens Medical Center will hold its second Red Heals Healthy Heart Screening event from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Feb. 4 in its main lobby. Heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death for both men and women in the U.S. Knowing the risk factors for heart disease and the lifestyle modifications that can help reduce the risk of heart attacks are key to having a healthy heart, according to a news release from the hospital.

  • Ample serving of new diet books to jump start 2015 resolutions

    Updated: Wed, Jan 28, 2015

    You probably know someone who lives on doughnuts but never seems to gain weight. While others just glance at a bagel and pack on the pounds. That’s just proof that we all have different nutritional demands and deficits, said Traci D. Mitchell, author of the coming “Belly Burn Plan” diet book. She advocates a personalized plan of eating and exercising tailored to your body type — not the one-size-fits-all trendy diet of the moment. “It’s a necessity, in my opinion,” Mitchell said. “There is no silver-bullet approach that works for everyone. I think you have a better chance of sticking to a diet that’s tailored to fit you, instead of a cookie-cutter approach.

  • Yahagi Heart Foundation benefits from necklace sales

    Updated: Wed, Jan 28, 2015

    It's a Valentine's Day gift that could help residents in the community. The public can donate to the Yahagi Heart Foundation by purchasing a heart necklace online. A portion of the sales of the $49 "You've Got Heart" leather and sterling silver necklace now until Tuesday will be donated to local heart surgeon Dr. Yusuke Yahagi's charitable foundation. The necklace features hand-etched details and a heart-shaped design, said Constance Kern, a sales representative for the Silpada company and Victoria resident. The necklace adjusts between 18 and 20 inches. She said the company donates $10 of every necklace sold at full price to WomenHeart: The National Coalition for Women with Heart Disease.

  • Senior women: Simple, must-do ways to reduce heart disease risks

    Updated: Wed, Jan 28, 2015

    (BPT) - A popular social media meme holds that “growing old isn’t for sissies.” Plenty of older women would probably agree with that sentiment as they cope with age-related issues specific to their gender, such as osteoporosis and increased risk of breast cancer. Yet the greatest health risk women face as they age is one society most often thinks of as predominantly affecting men: heart disease. “Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women in the United States,” notes Dr. Kevin O’Neil, chief medical officer for Brookdale, a leading senior living company that operates approximately 1,150 communities in 46 states. “Maybe one out of every 25 women may die of breast cancer, but one out of every two women will die from hear

  • Herald Democrat, Sherman, Texas, Micaela Hoops column

    Updated: Tue, Jan 27, 2015

    Herald Democrat, Sherman, Texas, Micaela Hoops column Micaela Hoops Herald Democrat, Sherman, Texas The internet is a great source of information on how to improve your life, however it can be distressing when the information you find says the life you're living isn't healthy. Ergh. Most recently, I read that sitting isn't good for you. Great. I'm sitting right now. I sit a lot in fact. So I found out that sitting contributes to a fuzzier brain as well as many chronic diseases, like osteoporosis, heart disease and cancer as well as a bad back. "What can I do?" I despair. The Washington Post's article, "A workout at work?" gives 12 exercise ideas. You can do one every half an hour or every hour, or however yo

  • Eat Well: Time to show your heart some love

    Updated: Tue, Jan 27, 2015

    While love has its own day on the 14th, heart health is the main focus of February. American Heart Month is a time to show yourself the love. And a statistic that always astonishes me is that cardiovascular disease is the No. 1 killer of women, as well as men, in the U.S., according to the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. The reason it's so stunning is that we hear so much about breast cancer when it comes to women. Another surprise is the fact that the number of preventable deaths from heart disease has declined in people ages 65 to 74 but has remained unchanged in those younger than 65. And, guys, you are twice as likely as women to die from preventable heart disease.

  • Snooze or lose

    Updated: Tue, Jan 27, 2015

    Can’t seem to get a good night’s sleep? Or think you are sleeping well, but find yourself tired and lacking energy? There is quite possibly a medical explanation for it, and it could potentially be caused by or lead to serious medical issues involving obesity, diabetes, heart disease and stroke. Not to mention lack of sleep leads to wrecks, on-the-job accidents, irritability, depression, hypertension, headaches, poor concentration, relationship and family issues and even sexual dysfunction. Residents of the Mineral Wells area can rest easier though now that there is a sleep disorder clinic based at Palo Pinto General Hospital.

  • Bill would update student phys ed standards, require tests

    Updated: Mon, Jan 26, 2015

    ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — A Minnesota state senator wants to hold more schools accountable for their students' physical education. Sen. Susan Kent introduced a bill Monday that would require yearly assessments of students' physical health starting with the 2017 school year. Students starting ninth grade in 2017 and later would also need two physical education credits to get their diploma. "What we know is that adequate movement during the day on a consistent basis and good physical education knowledge and skills ... are really important both to short-term wellness and learning and also obviously to long-term health," Kent said. Minnesota school districts are required to follow national physical education standards, but n

  • The Thrifty Traveler: Cost-saving tips for cold-weather canine travel

    Updated: Mon, Jan 26, 2015

    When it comes to winter travel, taking Rover along for the ride brings an entirely separate set of considerations. Paw sensitivity, body temperature, trail access and stability on icy walkways are just a few of the issues you’ll have on your plate. As with hot summer sidewalks, large-breed dogs can’t be picked up and carried like many pet parents do with tinier canines. This means planning ahead to make certain their needs are met. —Warmth: Fashion isn’t the only consideration when it comes to having a stash of sweaters and coats for your fur baby. Even large breed dogs can require extra warmth when it comes to extreme temperatures, and breeds with shorter legs have far less clearance between their torso and the cold, snowy




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