• Children's Mercy performs its first pediatric heart transplant

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    The last thing Hannah Mountz remembers before passing out was, “Should I tell my grandma?” That was about five weeks ago, as the 15-year-old Kansas City, North, girl sat in her room putting on makeup while her grandparents waited downstairs. Hannah felt what had become the frequent and unwelcome sensation of her heart skipping a beat. This time, a defibrillator that doctors had implanted in her chest shocked her heart five times, delivering five jolts of increasing voltage, before her heart beat normally. Hannah was put into intensive care at Children’s Mercy Hospital. And on Feb. 13, she became the first patient to receive a heart transplant at the hospital. It’s made an immediate and startling improvement in h

  • February is heart month

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    In an effort to promote and raise awareness about heart disease during American Heart Month, Holloman's Health Promotion and the Airman and Family Readiness Center hosted the Go Red for Women Thursday morning. According to the Go Red For Women campaign's website, Go Red for Women was created by the American Heart Association 10 years ago when they discovered that heart disease killed more women than men. Go Red for Women is a network of women dedicated to education, support, and research of heart disease. Dr. Monica Simms, a Family Health Practitioner for the 49th Medical Group at Holloman, said heart disease is the number one killer for both men and women. One in four women die of heart disease each year but there are ways t

  • Saved by one of his own: Firefighters save firefighter after he suffers heart attack in Broomfield

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    After more than 20 years of rushing to other people's aid, Chuck Crow found himself on the other end of a 911 call. Crow, an engineer and former firefighter and emergency medical technician with Arvada Fire Protection District, was coming back from a hiking trip in October when he started to have chest pains. Instead of waiting for the painful feeling to go away, he immediately pulled into a Broomfield gas station and called 911. Minutes later, rescuers came to his aid. Crow, a career firefighter who has responded to countless heart attacks in his career, had just been saved by fellow firefighters. Thursday, Crow got a chance to thank the members of the North Metro Fire Rescue District who responded to his call fo

  • Children's Mercy performs first pediatric heart transplant

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    Children’s Mercy Hospital has performed its first pediatric heart transplant, giving a new heart to a 15-year-old Kansas City girl. Hannah Mountz was diagnosed with cardiomyopathy when she was 12, the hospital said Friday. The condition leaves the heart weakened, making it difficult pump enough blood through the body. “We have been able to manage her heart condition with the help of the cardiology team at Children’s Mercy for the past three years,” said Hannah’s father, Tim Mountz, in a statement released by the hospital. “Hannah was on the transplant list for five weeks, and we were filled with so many emotions when we got the call that it was time for her to receive a new heart.” Hannah received her new

  • Indiana heart disease survivors work to spread awareness

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    MUNSTER, Ind. (AP) — Olivia Stonehill and Mary Rowan are alive today because of recent advancements in heart-care technology. And they're sharing their stories in the hopes of spreading awareness and inspiring future improvements. Let's start with Olivia. The Valparaiso preschooler came into the world in May 2009, seemingly the picture of perfect health. As she was about to be discharged from the hospital, though, her heart failed. She was rushed to University of Chicago Medicine Comer Children's Hospital, where doctors diagnosed her with a congenital heart defect, the leading cause of infant death in the U.S. She underwent open-heart surgery and spent 36 days in pediatric intensive care.

  • Deadly kidney disease can make a sneak attack

    Updated: Fri, Feb 27, 2015

    Before she was diagnosed with chronic kidney disease, or CKD, Kerri Gwinn-Harris, 51, never gave her kidneys much thought. “Every year, I got a mammogram, Pap smear and exam, but who thinks to check their kidneys?” she said. In January 2014, she awoke in the hospital to the faces of her worried children. “I thought I had sat down at home to watch a movie,” recalled the Ballwin, Mo., corporate trainer. “But I’d passed out, and my daughter got me to the hospital.” The next four months were a blur of medical procedures and doctor referrals. She did not get relief from symptoms, including back pain, ankle swelling and lethargy, until she assembled a team that included a nephrologist (kidney specialist), urologist and rena

  • Survivor profile: Stroke survivor credits St. Francis staff, facility with full recovery

    Updated: Thu, Feb 26, 2015

    Sponsored Feature: Look for daily Heart Health features on gazette.com during American Heart Month. “My story is simple, but complicated,” Joe* said. It all started in May 2014, during a month-long trip to Hong Kong. “I developed a blood clot that traveled all the way through my body, my heart, my lungs – and got lodged in the right side of my brain.” As a result, Joe experienced a stroke on May 19 at age 60 and was simultaneously diagnosed with cardiomyopathy – disease of the heart muscle. “I had felt horrible for about five days, but just attributed it to jet lag from overseas travel,” he said. “But that was the first time I knew something was really wrong.

  • Covenant annouces partnership with Texas Children's Hospital

    Updated: Thu, Feb 26, 2015

    Covenant Children’s Hospital has announced an agreement with Texas Children’s Hospital of Houston that is designed to bring world-class pediatric cardiac care to the West Texas region. Chris Dougherty, chief executive officer of Covenant Children’s Hospital, said the agreement will benefit the health of children of the West Texas region immensely. “Covenant Children’s and Texas Children’s Hospital have entered into a partnership to bring world-class pediatric cardiac surgery care here to West Texas,” Dougherty said in a news conference Thursday morning at Covenant.

  • Survivor profile: Calcium Score Scan discovers blockage in man's heart

    Updated: Thu, Feb 26, 2015

    Sponsored Feature: Look for daily Heart Health features on gazette.com during American Heart Month. If Marty Townsend could give any piece of advice, it would be not to put all your eggs in one basket – so to speak. “If something is wrong, don’t rely on the results of one test,” he said. “I relied on just one test and it could have killed me.” The first time Townsend experienced chest pain was in October 2011; he was walking into the Pepsi Center in Denver to watch a Colorado Avalanche hockey game. “I suddenly felt a powerful constriction in my chest,” he said. As soon as he got home, Townsend scheduled an appointment with his primary physician, who suggested he undergo a chest stress test. The test showed no

  • Cardiologists urge caution with daily aspirin for non-heart attack patients

    Updated: Thu, Feb 26, 2015

    At Martin O’Riordan’s cardiology practice in the Philadelphia area, it happens weekly. A 45- or 50-year-old patient mentions that her father had a heart attack at the same age. Worried that the same fate will befall her despite being in good health, she takes baby aspirin every day. O’Riordan’s typical response: Please stop. Physicians have known for decades that daily, low-dose aspirin makes sense for patients who have had a heart attack or stroke, as it sharply reduces the chance of having a second one. But for people who have never had one of these cardiovascular “events,” the thinking on aspirin is less clear, despite two recent large-scale studies.

  • bc-abby adv09 02-25

    Updated: Wed, Feb 25, 2015

    FROM UNIVERSAL UCLICK FOR RELEASE: MONDAY, MARCH 9, 2015 DEAR ABBY by Abigail Van Buren KIDNEY DISEASE OFTEN GOES UNDETECTED UNTIL IT'S TOO LATE ****** ****** ****** COPYRIGHT 2015 UNIVERSAL UCLICK 1130 Walnut, Kansas City, MO 64106; 816-581-7500

  • Donation jar for sick girl, 8, stolen from Pahoa store

    Updated: Wed, Feb 25, 2015

    PAHOA, Hawaii (AP) — A donation jar used to raise money for an 8-year-old girl who needs a heart transplant was stolen from a Big Island store. Irie Hawaii manager Jose Miranda said customers had already contributed at least $200 for Madisyn Tamaki, a third-grade student at Pahoa Elementary School. Surveillance footage at the store shows a man grabbing the jar from a counter and stuffing it into his pants on Monday, Hawaii News Now (http://ow.ly/JE7Oi ) reported. "I was watching the video and my heart just dropped to my toes, you know?" Miranda said. "Everybody has some kind of etiquette — even robbers, even burglars. And for him to not even think about this 8-year-old needing a heart transplant to me is mind-boggli

  • Children and Sodium – the Salty Truths

    Updated: Wed, Feb 25, 2015

    Approximately one in nine children in the U.S. has blood pressure above the normal range for their age. Excess sodium can be related to increased blood pressure. Rising sodium intake, combined with growing obesity among children, are prompting new government studies that take a closer look at children and salt consumption. According to a recent CDC report, more than 70% of commercial meals for toddlers contain too much salt. Toddler foods high in sodium include dinners, cereal bars, breakfast pastries, snacks, and desserts. The study raises concern that children may develop an early taste for salty foods that can actually contribute to obesity and other health risks later in life. Of course we need limited amounts of sodium.

  • Eugene police examining whether sick dog rescued or stolen

    Updated: Wed, Feb 25, 2015

    EUGENE, Ore. (AP) — An animal lover broke into the yard of a Eugene home last week to rescue a dog that appeared to be in acute distress, after warning city officials about the animal's condition. Now, city officials are investigating the dog's owner for animal neglect — and the woman who took the dog for theft. The case poses a thorny question: Was the woman rescuing — or stealing — the thin, sick dog? It's in dispute whether the dog's poor condition was a result of owner neglect, or was inevitable given the dog's illnesses.

  • Specialist offers advice for better heart health

    Updated: Wed, Feb 25, 2015

    If you smoke two packs of cigarettes per day at approximately $6.30 per pack, you are spending $4,599.00 a year. A five night stay at a Sandals resort in Jamaica is $500 a night for a couple which equals $2,500. Add your round trip ticket for about $1,214 for the couple on American Airlines and you still have $885 left over for spending money. Those were the most up-to-date figures offered at the top of a lively conversation about heart health Thursday evening and Friday morning offered by Cardiologist Dr. Jeffery Sparling during National Heart Health month. Sparling's address was offered through Woodward Regional Hospital's Senior Circle program offered each month in the cafeteria on the northwest side of the hospital

  • Heart attacks linked to angry outbursts, study finds

    Published: Tue, Feb 24, 2015

    A new study finds the risk of a heart attack is eight and a half times higher after an angry outburst. Lenox Hill Hospital cardiologist Dr. Tara Narula joins "CBS This Morning" to discuss the health risks of blowing your top.

  • Lipitor inventor takes aim at cholesterol again

    Updated: Tue, Feb 24, 2015

    DETROIT — The scientist widely credited with co-discovering the best-selling drug in U.S. history — cholesterol-lowering Lipitor — is quietly back at it. After reviving Esperion Therapeutics in 2008 — just a year after Pfizer had closed the first version of the biotech company — Roger Newton is once again taking aim at cholesterol. This time he’s taking a different approach: Seeking to create a drug that reduces so-called bad LDL cholesterol in people whose bodies don’t respond well to statins. The irony is not lost on biotech industry observers. Where Lipitor, his first creation, falls short, Newton now sees a huge opportunity.

  • What’s up, doc?: A checkup checklist for your 20s

    Updated: Tue, Feb 24, 2015

    So you signed up for Obamacare — now what you do with it is entirely up to you. But with your fancy-pants new health coverage, you may consider seeing a doctor. Regular doctor’s visits are anecdotally less common for people in their 20s, who generally are healthier and less settled than people in their 30s and 40s. But that doesn’t mean you should skip the physicals: Most check-ups in your 20s will be for preventative care and lifestyle issues, according to Dr. Allison Remesz in Chicago. “If we catch things early, it’s early detection and prevention of cardiac disease and stroke in the future — a longer life,” she said. And it’s important to establish a relationship with a doctor while you’re still hea

  • Heart condition suspected in death of Rutgers student

    Updated: Tue, Feb 24, 2015

    NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. (AP) — His sister suspects a heart condition may be to blame for the death of a Rutgers University freshman who collapsed during a recreational basketball game. A Rutgers spokesman says lifeguards in the Cook/Douglass Recreation Center performed CPR on 18-year-old Patrick Awosogba on Sunday. The East Brunswick resident later died at a hospital. His sister, Dr. Temipope Awosogba, who is a resident physician in Boston, tells NJ.com (http://bit.ly/1FSCdZj ) it seems her brother had an undetected enlarged heart. ___ Information from: NJ.com, http://www.nj.

  • Healthy hearts the aim of grant money in Va., W.Va.

    Updated: Tue, Feb 24, 2015

    CHARLESTON, W.Va. (AP) — More than $644,000 in grant funding aimed at promoting healthier lives in Appalachia is being awarded to care providers in Virginia and West Virginia. The grants are from the AstraZeneca HealthCare Foundation and are aimed at reducing the risk of cardiovascular disease. Heart disease accounts for 23 percent of all deaths in West Virginia and 22 percent of all deaths in Virginia. In Virginia, the grant money will benefit St. Mary's Health Wagon in Wise. It will be used for a program to identify, minimize and prevent heart disease through education, screening and medication management. Also sharing in the grant will be West Virginia Health Right Inc. and its SCALE program.




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