Top Stories


  • Yunt: Domko was so much more to Holy Family than coach

    Updated: Fri, Sep 19, 2014

    You know a conversation is never good, when the person asking the question says, "Did you know ...?" My immediate reaction was, "Oh no." And for the record, I did know Joe Domko. Albeit not well, but we had crossed paths a few times during the state wrestling tournament and when I arrived to BoCoPreps, he was one of the names I was pleased to see that I would have the chance to work with on regular basis. I never got that chance. By the time wrestling season rolled around last winter he was already fighting his battle with heart disease and was rarely around the school. On August 30, Coach Domko lost his battle with the disease at the age of 69 and the celebration of his life was last Saturday, Sept. 13.

  • Firefighters honored for saving man's life at the gym

    Updated: Fri, Sep 19, 2014

    Firefighters honored for saving man's life at the gym Beatriz Alvarado Corpus Christi Caller-Times, Texas CORPUS CHRISTI -- With two 90 pound dumbbells in hand, Michael H. Smith's heart stopped seconds before his workout was complete. "I was dead for about two minutes but I had two paramedics here, one over here and a nurse," said Smith as he told the story signaling where they stood around him that day. "What are the odds?" Neonatal nurse practitioner, Rosemary Fries was presented with The Corpus Christi Fire Department Citizen Certificate of Merit and three firefighters were given the Life Saving Award on Thursday.

  • Daughter calls Utah doctor a monster at sentencing

    Updated: Fri, Sep 19, 2014

    PROVO, Utah (AP) — A Utah doctor convicted of murdering his wife in a case that became a true-crime cable TV obsession was sentenced Friday to 17 years to life in prison at a hearing in which his daughter called him a monster. The long-awaited sentence came seven years after prosecutors say Martin MacNeill knocked out his wife with drugs prescribed following cosmetic surgery and left her to die in a bathtub so he could begin a new life with his mistress. "My father's facade has now crumbled," said Alexis Somers, who asked the judge to give MacNeill the maximum penalty. "My father is a monster. He has never shown remorse for any of his crimes. He must be held accountable for his actions.

  • Ebola is Katrina moment for WHO's Chan

    Updated: Fri, Sep 19, 2014

    (c) 2014, Bloomberg News. GENEVA — When Margaret Chan was elected to lead the World Health Organization, she said the agency's priority was to improve the health of people in Africa. Eight years later, the 67-year-old Chan is under attack for letting an Ebola outbreak there spiral beyond control, and this week her group found itself eclipsed as the leader of humanitarian efforts to control the epidemic. The United Nations said it would create a separate Health Mission to coordinate care in West Africa, and the United Statese announced it would send 3,000 troops to build hospitals there.

  • Fall TV 2014: Reviews for all the new dramas and comedies

    Updated: Fri, Sep 19, 2014

    (c) 2014, The Washington Post. Better shows! That's what we've been crying out for during so many seasons of network and cable agony. Have our pleas at last been heard? Well, don't get too excited, but there is measurable improvement in this fall's shows. (After last year's miserable crop, this season had nowhere to go but up.) Mediocrity still shows its forgettable face, but even the flat stuff this season at least has some contours. Here are my quick reviews and premiere dates for 26 new comedies and dramas. Top picks include the CBS drama "Madam Secretary" and the Amazon comedy "Transparent" but steer clear of CBS's dreadful new dramas "Stalker" and "Scorpion." - "Madam Secretary" Sunday, Sept. 21, 8:30 p

  • Prosecutor: No criminal liability in jail deaths

    Updated: Fri, Sep 19, 2014

    FORT SMITH, Ark. (AP) — Sebastian County Prosecuting Attorney Dan Shue says there is no criminal liability on the part of the Sebastian County jail for the deaths of two inmates earlier this year. Inmate Charles Tillman was pronounced dead at a Fort Smith hospital in April after other inmates found him on the floor of the jail and unresponsive. Inmate Amanda Dawn Potter died in April after being found unresponsive in a holding cell. The Times Record reported (http://bit.ly/1plB7Io ) Friday that an autopsy cited heart disease as Tillman's cause of death. The prosecutor's report said Potter's autopsy cited "combined drug toxicity" in her death, noting that several drugs were found in her system. ___ Information fr

  • Jury won't consider deaths in Ga. salmonella trial

    Updated: Thu, Sep 18, 2014

    ALBANY, Ga. (AP) — Shirley Mae Almer died a few days before Christmas in 2008 at a Minnesota hospital where the 72-year-old woman was already weak with illness when she was fed peanut butter contaminated with salmonella. Nearly six years later, a federal jury is weighing criminal charges against the man who owned the peanut plant blamed for producing tainted food that sickened hundreds across the U.S. But after six weeks of trial testimony that included nearly 50 witnesses and an estimated 1,000 documents, jurors never heard that Almer or anybody else died after eating the company's peanut butter. The jury ended its first full day of deliberations Thursday without a verdict in the trial of former Peanut Corporation of Ameri

  • Time for flu prevention - Getting a jump on the bug

    Updated: Thu, Sep 18, 2014

    MIAMI — Sneeze, shiver, cough … As flu season draws near, usually hitting hardest between October and May, the Center for Disease Control and Prevention once again recommends getting a yearly flu vaccination. Influenza, more commonly known as the flu, is an infectious disease — at the least miserable for most — but a case of the flu can also lead to more serious illnesses, complications, hospitalizations and even death. The flu causes symptoms which can include chills, fever, runny nose, sore throat, muscle pain, headache, coughing, weakness/fatigue and general discomfort and may produce nausea and vomiting. “The CDC usually recommends you can start getting flu shots in August,” Sweta Andrews, an Oklahoma Universi

  • Seven benefits of high-intensity interval training

    Updated: Thu, Sep 18, 2014

    If boutique gyms like Barry’s Bootcamp and Orangetheory are popping up all over your city, you’re noticing the explosive trend of high-intensity interval training, or HIIT. These fast-and-furious workouts feature short, powerful bursts of exercise as the key to getting the most out of your fitness regimen. And it doesn't look like the HIIT approach is going anywhere anytime soon. According to the 2013 Fitness Programs & Equipment Trends Report from the IDEA Health and Fitness Association, more than 90 percent of all fitness professionals are incorporating HIIT into their programs, and for good reason: HIIT is a proven way to get you fitter, faster.

  • Changing guidelines: Does bed rest help or hurt a pregnancy?

    Updated: Thu, Sep 18, 2014

    ST. LOUIS, Mo. — When Lindsey Lafferty was 22 weeks pregnant with triplets, her body showed signs that it was preparing for delivery, so her doctor prescribed one of the most common interventions used to prevent preterm birth: bed rest. For most of the past eight weeks, seven of which have been in the hospital, Lafferty has lain in bed, only getting up to use the bathroom, shower or go on a short wheelchair ride. She eventually got to sit upright in a chair for 30 minutes a day, and recently got the OK to walk down the hallway of the antepartum unit at Mercy Hospital St. Louis. “It was exhausting,” said Lafferty, 31, of O’Fallon, Mo. She is worried about being strong enough to take care of three newborns.

  • Meatless meals even meat eaters will love

    Updated: Wed, Sep 17, 2014

    In a region where beef often is what’s for dinner, it’s hard to make the case for vegetables, much less convince people to forgo meat altogether. However, heart disease and obesity are problems of epidemic proportions in America, so more people are finding ways to cut down their meat intake. One way to do this is to make vegetables the star attraction of the dinner plate. Lexi Moore, a volunteer with Goode Food-Delivered, has been a vegetarian since she was 19 but is engaged to a meat eater. She knows it’s difficult to embrace meat-free meals, so she’s glad that many vegetables are hearty enough to fill you up without feeling like you’re missing something.

  • FDA Panel Backs Limits on Testosterone Drugs

    Updated: Wed, Sep 17, 2014

    c.2014 New York Times News Service HYATTSVILLE, Md. — An expert panel voted overwhelmingly on Wednesday for the Food and Drug Administration to impose strict new limitations on the multibillion-dollar testosterone drug industry, which would tighten labels for the medicines so they are not prescribed to men who only have problems related to aging, such as low energy and libido. The FDA often takes the advice of such panels. Once used to treat serious medical conditions, testosterone drugs are now taken by over 2 million American men, mostly for symptoms that are largely the result of aging, a pattern that has alarmed some medical experts.

  • Q&A: Barbra Streisand, the feminist, sings on

    Updated: Wed, Sep 17, 2014

    NEW YORK (AP) — Barbra Streisand's new album of duets only includes male singers, but it wasn't a conscious effort to exclude females. "Everyone we asked was ... busy," Streisand said. The performer almost scored one major diva: Beyonce. "She had her people try to do a track of one of the songs from my movie, 'A Star is Born,' and it just, we didn't have the time to finish it, to get it right," she said. "We had to release the album. Maybe someday we'll do a duet because she's so great." "Partners," released Tuesday, features Billy Joel, Stevie Wonder, John Mayer, John Legend and Babyface, who produced the album. In a recent interview with The Associated Press, Streisand talked about music, directing, women's ri

  • BC-Il--Illinois News Digest 12 am

    Updated: Wed, Sep 17, 2014

    Here's a look at AP's general news coverage at 12 a.m. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP-Chicago bureau at 312-781-0500 or chifax@ap.org. Caryn Rousseau and Tammy Webber are on the desk. AP-Illinois News Editor Hugh Dellios can be reached at 312-920-3624 or hdellios@ap.org. A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date. All times are Central. Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

  • OPINION: CVS boldly snuffs out tobacco sales at its drugstores

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    Many stores keep things behind the counter that have a lot of value and that some customers might grab without bothering to pay. Cigarettes fall in that category. They’re stacked in colorful packs and cartons, within reach so store clerks and gas station attendants can get to them quickly. It was no different at the CVS Caremark, now CVS Health, store at Independence and Prospect avenues. At the Northeast area store on my way home from work, cigarette sales used to bring in a lot of traffic. That has changed. CVS — a month ahead of schedule — stopped selling tobacco products at this and its 7,700 other pharmacies and stores nationwide. Larry J.

  • 10 Things to Know for Wednesday

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Wednesday: 1. TOP US GENERAL: GROUND TROOPS MAY BE NEEDED IN MIDEAST Gen. Martin Dempsey tells Congress that if the current approach fails to defeat the Islamic State group, he might recommend deploying American ground forces. 2. OMINOUS FORECAST FOR EBOLA With so many people now spreading the disease, the number of cases could start doubling every three weeks, the World Health Organization says. 3. NEW UKRAINE TAKING SHAPE President Poroshenko calls a vote to lower tariffs and otherwise strengthen ties with Europe a "very decisive step" toward bringing Ukraine fully into the EU. 4.

  • Grant renewals bring $14.2 million to OMRF programs

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    The National Institutes of Health has renewed five research grants for the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation. The awards, which total $14.2 million over the next three to five years, will allow OMRF scientists to continue their research on cancer, lupus and heart disease while continuing to train junior-level scientists. “The competition for these federal dollars is fierce,” OMRF Vice President of Research Paul Kincade said in a news release. “This is tremendous news for us, because these awards are rare and are a real testament to the high caliber of research underway at OMRF.” Rodger McEver received a four-year, $1.7 million grant to continue his studies related to inflammation in blood vessels and blood cl

  • AP News in Brief at 5:58 p.m. EDT

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    US may use ground forces in Iraq if air campaign against militants fails, top general says WASHINGTON (AP) — American ground troops may be needed to battle Islamic State forces in the Middle East if President Barack Obama's current strategy fails, the nation's top military officer said Tuesday as Congress plunged into an election-year debate of Obama's plan to expand airstrikes and train Syrian rebels. "To be clear, if we reach the point where I believe our advisers should accompany Iraqi troops on attacks against specific ISIL targets, I will recommend that to the president," Army Gen. Martin Dempsey declared in testimony to the Senate Armed Services Committee, referring to the militants by an alternative name. Press

  • Obesity rates have stabilized, but Americans’ waistlines are still growing

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    Americans may have stopped putting on pounds, but their waistlines are still expanding, according to a new analysis from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The average waist circumference of U.S. adults has increased by about 3 percent since the end of the last century. In 1999 and 2000, the waists of Americans who were at least 20 years old measured 37.6 inches (or 95.5 centimeters) around. By 2011 and 2012, that figure had grown to about 38.8 inches (98.5 cm), CDC researchers report in Wednesday’s edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Those figures are age-adjusted averages, but the trend applies to pretty much all demographic groups, the report says.

  • CDC study: Americans' bellies are expanding fast

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    CHICAGO (AP) — The number of American men and women with big-bellied, apple-shaped figures — the most dangerous kind of obesity — has climbed at a startling rate over the past decade, according to a government study. People whose fat has settled mostly around their waistlines instead of in their hips, thighs, buttocks or all over are known to run a higher risk of heart disease, diabetes and other obesity-related ailments. Fifty-four percent of U.S. adults have abdominal obesity, up from 46 percent in 1999-2000, researchers reported in Wednesday's Journal of the American Medical Association. Abdominal obesity is defined as a waistline of more than 35 inches in women and more than 40 inches in men. During the 12-yea