• Denial of personalized license plate is reprehensible

    Published: Sun, Mar 29, 2015

    The criteria listed in “Gay advocate’s license request denied” (News, March 24) for denial of personalized license plates are understandable. In most cases, the plates people try to have personalized are offensive in some manner. However, “LGBTALY” does not carry a sexual connotation, express contempt for a race or gender, refer to body parts, gangs, drugs, and isn’t inappropriate. John Patrick Keefe II's request for this license plate simply shows his support of groups that always welcome that acceptance.

  • Oklahoma misses out on liquor marketplace

    Published: Sun, Mar 29, 2015

    Regarding “Voters should have say in debate over liquor laws” (Our Views, March 23): The wine my wife likes to drink costs less than $8 in Texas, Missouri and about every other state. In Oklahoma, $16 is a good buy. As a result, I buy beer in this state and buy several hundred dollars’ worth of wine and other liquor when I’m in other states. Those fortunate enough to live in the northeastern part of Oklahoma just drive to Joplin, Mo., where Sam’s Club sells wine and hard liquor at half the price of Oklahoma. Costco will not come into Oklahoma in a big way because of our liquor laws. When are our leaders going to wake up to the lost revenue and make this a more competitive state for its citizens? Texas has 25 Costco store

  • Never acceptable use of N-word

    Published: Sun, Mar 29, 2015

    Regarding “Debate on use of racial slur continues” (YourLife, March 23): I fail to understand how anyone with a measurable IQ and any knowledge of American history would think that using the N-word is acceptable at any time, in any context, by anyone regardless of race. Derogatory doesn’t begin to define the vileness of this word and its meanings. Growing up in the Old South in the 1950s and 1960s, I know the deep degeneracy of this word. Many of our modern-day black youth and unfortunately some of our supposed educated black adults are either ignorant of the history of this word or refuse to accept that the passage of time doesn’t change the genesis of it.

  • No training on diversity, please

    Published: Sun, Mar 29, 2015

    In “Debate on use of racial slur continues” (YourLife, March 23), a pastor/university professor proposed that university students be “trained” on dealing with the issue of diversity. We “train” the physical characteristics of our body, as well as dogs and horses, but we must be cautious about the concept of “training” relating to the brain, and especially to the brain of a university student. Brains (minds) should be about education, an activity that deals with facts and ideas — thinking and reasoning. Education shouldn’t be about repetition and enslavement to mental restrictions. Education shouldn’t be a process of rote, except where that practice is in furtherance of expanding educational attainment, i.e.

  • There's no dispute that wastewater injection wells induce seismicity

    Published: Sat, Mar 28, 2015

    “Concerns over quake swarm seem to be growing in state” (Our Views, March 25) is disingenuous. Peer-reviewed science for the last 45 years, from across this country and others, has proven high-volume, high-pressure Class II wastewater injection wells induce seismicity. There is no dispute. The only geologists who disagree are those employed by the oil and gas industry, or those in state government that benefit from the oil and gas lobby. Hydraulic fracturing of horizontal wells in shale since 2009 produces far more wastewater than this state has ever had to dispose. The Oklahoman’s power as media should be used to encourage the industry to develop alternative disposal methods. The industry certainly has the technological

  • Tulsa official's bad idea

    Published: Sat, Mar 28, 2015

    Skye McNeil, the Tulsa chamber of commerce’s senior vice president of governmental affairs and a former member of the Oklahoma House of Representatives, says the Legislature needs to focus on bills that improve the business climate, not tarnish the state's image. In 2013, McNeil sponsored legislation to allow the slaughter of horses in Oklahoma, envisioning the bill would help the horse livestock economy and level the playing field for Oklahoma to compete for horse slaughter facilities even though they have a history of environmental degradation and a negative stigma for communities that host them. It was highly unpopular at local, regional, state and national levels. Public opposition to the bill probably factored into her decision

  • Defending OG&E's motives

    Published: Sat, Mar 28, 2015

    Ann Bornholdt (Your Views, March 21) stated that OG&E is ignoring methods to make electricity much cheaper but failed to mention what those methods are. If OG&E could get rid of the hardware and the hassles associated with burning coal and make more profit while maintaining a reasonable rate to a customer, why wouldn’t it? Who knows more about the business of making electricity, the Sierra Club? The EPA? Or a company that has been providing it for more than 100 years? If wind energy is the answer to the future, and can provide all our needs, then why do we need conventional power plants at all? OG&E’s employees live in Oklahoma and pay an electric bill every month.

  • Good information from state constitution

    Published: Fri, Mar 27, 2015

    Regarding “Ten Commandments legal battle expenses mount up” (News, March 22): Thank you for including the complete text of Article Two, Section Five of the state constitution. It would be well if those 54 words were included in every news story about the many controversies involving the use of state property or taxes to benefit any religion. Because as H.L. Mencken said, “When somebody says it’s not about the money, it’s about the money.

  • Teachers' salaries aren't too bad

    Published: Fri, Mar 27, 2015

    Regarding “Penalty on work for teachers needs to end” (Point of View, March 18): I come from a family of teachers, including my parents, two siblings and one of my children. It takes a special person to be a teacher, and I have always tried to let my kids’ teachers know that I believe they’re special. That said, I don’t think teachers, including teachers in Oklahoma, are underpaid. An average salary that exceeds $44,000 for nine months of work in our low cost-of-living state isn’t too bad. Perhaps the greatest perk of all is the ability to have a work schedule that fits that of your own children.

  • Apply the pressure to federal government

    Published: Fri, Mar 27, 2015

    Regarding “Oklahoma should use its Article V authority” (Point of View, March 14) by Tom Coburn: At one time, I was opposed to term limits for members of Congress, because there were some who had the integrity to put the welfare of our nation at high standard. Apparently they are now far in the minority. There must be at least 34 states that call for such a convention, and it’s imperative the Oklahoma Legislature go on record as being one of those, and do so immediately. It’s obvious, if anyone heeds the news, that our federal government is not going to correct itself without the proper pressure being applied.

  • Will The Oklahoman call the Founders incompetent?

    Published: Fri, Mar 27, 2015

    Jonathan Schmeh’s letter (Your Views, March 22) serves as a reminder of how poorly worded and ambiguous the Second Amendment is. I recall The Oklahoman recently criticized more recent legislation that was poorly worded and ambiguous, indeed calling the writers “incompetent” because of it.

  • History lesson on militia

    Published: Fri, Mar 27, 2015

    If Jonathan Schmeh (Your Views, March 22) would read history and study the Constitution, he would realize that the term “well regulated” meant well-trained and well-equipped with the most modern firearms and cannons at the time. When the Constitution was written, there was no standing army and all males between the ages of 17 and 64 years were automatically in the “militia.” That’s why it has stood for centuries as a right that could not be infringed upon, since the British were on their way to confiscate all firearms and powder. The intention of the framers of the Constitution was that there would be no standing army, but this didn’t stand as history has proven a need for one.

  • $91 million is enough for center

    Published: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    Regarding “Optimism fades over fate of Indian cultural center” (News, March 20): The best option for completion would be to turn the existing building over to one of the tribes and let them put a casino in. The story said $91 million has already been spent and estimates indicate another $80 million is needed to finish the project. Ask yourself, how many government building projects come in at the budgeted amount? I’m of the opinion that enough of the taxpayers’ money has been spent on this project.

  • Why is Indian cultural center so costly?

    Published: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    Regarding “Optimism fades over fate of Indian cultural center” (News, March 20): Why is it taking so much money to construct this facility? According to the story, $91 million has already been spent and another $80 million is estimated for completion (we all know that number will be higher). And, $1.5 million per year is being spent to maintain the property. Why have Indian tribes only contributed $7.4 million toward this project? There is a museum in Kentucky, near Cincinnati, The Creation Museum. It’s a world-class, 70,000-square-foot facility that has attracted over 1.2 million visitors since its opening. Total cost for this museum: $27 million, all raised by private donors.

  • Sportsmanship is alive and well

    Published: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    “Schooled in a lesson of love” (News, March 18) by sports columnist Jenni Carlson had me in tears. I had to stop reading several times to compose myself, only to re-read the article again with the same results. Here’s proof that sportsmanship and decency are alive and well with today’s youth. The Oklahoma City Storm team members, along with their coach Kurt Talbott, are to be commended for their generous act during their homeschool national tournament game against Christian Homeschool Sports Ministries. Giving opposing player Cordell Davis an opportunity to participate and score in the biggest game of his young life was truly a compassionate and inspirational act. It’s not the final score that made the Storm winners, it’s the

  • Good news on front page is appreciated

    Published: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    How refreshing to see “Schooled in a less of love” (News, March 18) on the front page of The Oklahoman. The love that was shown by the Storm team to the Houston homeschooler in their championship game was a “tear-jerker.” Allowing Cordell Davis to score, even though his team was behind and obviously not going to win the game, was something that boy will remember the rest of his life. I’m so appreciative that you printed it on the front page. So many pieces of printed news deal with negative events, crime and sorrow. This was definitely a positive report. Thank you.

  • Boren's overreaction demeans all members of Greek letter organizations

    Published: Sun, Mar 22, 2015

    I’m excited to see the fervor for a higher standard of student behavior at OU, and to see the athletes and coaches standing in solidarity against prejudicial language and attitudes. But I don’t agree with President Boren’s overreaction of throwing everyone under the SAE party bus, whether they were in it or not. The decree of guilt by association certainly expedited swift action, but has led to the perception that all SAEs are prejudiced. I’m an OU SAE, class of 1957, who was downcast by the prejudicial chant that some disrespectful brothers sang; yet the rush to judgment has, in effect, painted all of us as racists. I reject and resent that picture.

  • Vision for all of Oklahoma is needed

    Published: Sun, Mar 22, 2015

    “Bad news: Bad business” (Business, March 15) noted that the Greater Oklahoma City Chamber spent $1 million in an ad campaign promoting Oklahoma’s quality of life. I have lived in this state since 2000. I have seen the incredible transformation of Oklahoma City to a vibrant, growing, modern city that is now the benchmark for all to envy. Rather than spend ad money telling people what we want them to think, spend the money on a future state plan that includes renewing our roads, bridges, power grid and lakes, which also generate business and job opportunities. This takes a vision for our future, a plan, and then the leadership to execute that plan. Let’s change Oklahoma like Oklahoma City has changed.

  • Time to correct 'bringin' up' problem

    Published: Sun, Mar 22, 2015

    “ ‘Much larger than one video or one chant,’”(News, March 13) could not be more true. There have been many great suggestions on how to fix this and bring healing, but those are just patches that don’t deal with the underlying problem. I’d suggest a lack of what we in Oklahoma call “bringin’ up” is what led to the SAE incident. In years past, “bringin’ up” was the job of parents. Somehow that changed and the responsibility was absorbed by the teachers because they have the kids most of the day anyway. And now suddenly it’s President Boren’s and OU’s problem.

  • Teachers shouldn't get special treatment

    Published: Sun, Mar 22, 2015

    State Sen. A.J. Griffin and Rep. Leslie Osborn (Point of View, March 18) propose eliminating income tax for teachers. While I am no fan of taxes, I am against this proposal. I have been a teacher for 29 years and will be retired as of May. This proposal would benefit me, but it’s not best for all of our citizens. Why should I or an engineer be given preference over my fellow Oklahomans? There is a shortage of teachers for sure, but changing tax law won’t correct that problem. The question of fairness is more important in the long run than a short-term attempt to fix this deficiency. We all should be required to pay our fair share.




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