• Guns don't belong on campus

    Published: Wed, Oct 22, 2014

    Obviously, some legislators want to carry guns on campus and text while driving. The texting parts doesn’t need my input, other than to say that people die while texting and driving. Guns? Well that danger can’t be predicted, but an excellent example was placed before the public recently when an OU football player allegedly punched a female student in the face. His attorney said it was reactive. If someone on campus had a gun and was challenged physically, then that person might react by firing the gun. We know many people are secure with guns, but there’s always a possibility that a reactionary person would shoot first and then explain. It’s stupid to think that guns on campus would never present a terribly fatal

  • 'Religion of peace' are perpetrators of killings and unspeakable violence

    Published: Wed, Oct 22, 2014

    Lutheran Bishop Michael K. Girlinghouse (Point of View, Oct. 12) assured us that Islam is a religion of peace. The only basis offered for his belief was his personal experiences with Muslims. The Muslims with whom Girlinghouse has interacted may in fact be peaceful or they may be practicing al-Taqiyya, which provides that a Muslim is expected to disguise or conceal his true feelings, convictions and strategies if it benefits Islam to do so. The Koran instructs Muslims not to take nonbelievers as friends, except when it’s to the Muslim’s benefit.

  • Grossly misplaced police response

    Published: Wed, Oct 22, 2014

    “OKC police, medical examiner reveal more about shoot-out” (News, Oct. 16) reported that a 911 caller said she had been attacked, drugged and held against her will. Nearly 30 minutes passed before police dispatch assigned an officer to respond to “trouble unknown.” The first officer arrived on the scene 37 minutes after the 911 call. One person ended up dead, two officers were wounded and two others were in critical condition. Dispatchers save lives and are frequently able to alert police to potentially dangerous situations for the victim, police and the public. Dispatch failed in this instance.

  • Response to Ebola is negligent

    Published: Sun, Oct 19, 2014

    Ebola imposes risks to Americans. There is the risk of transmitting a disease, which has a 70 percent or greater fatality rate, into the population of the United States. This disease imposes a risk of death to health care workers having limited experience, training and equipment to deal with it. The immediate and long-term costs of Ebola on our health care system for treating and monitoring patients and those in contact with Ebola patients are significant. When a person comes to the U.S. without health insurance, who pays for this? Studies have shown that animals such as pigs contract and transmit the disease. Some animals show outward signs of the disease and die; pigs are asymptomatic.

  • Death penalty moratorium appropriate

    Published: Sun, Oct 19, 2014

    With the news that state Attorney General Scott Pruitt has asked to delay upcoming executions in Oklahoma, Gov. Mary Fallin should place an immediate moratorium on the death penalty in this state. Even though state officials said jrecently they were prepared for the executions currently scheduled for next month, the state hasn’t yet secured the necessary drugs for the executions. In addition, new protocols recommended by the Oklahoma Department of Public Safety haven’t been implemented. The staff hasn’t been fully trained on the new initiatives. Instead of merely postponing scheduled executions, Oklahoma needs a moratorium in order to allow for the necessary time to properly train all of those involved in executions and to

  • Oklahoma needs o decriminalize marijuana

    Published: Sun, Oct 19, 2014

    “Considerable downside to decriminalization of pot” (Our Views, Oct. 13) criticized state Sen. Connie Johnson for advocating decriminalizing marijuana use. Yet any thinking person has to recognize the wisdom of Johnson’s position. Pot shouldn’t be categorized as a Schedule I drug. It’s not addictive like opiates or amphetamines. Despite the claims of law enforcement officials, it’s not a “gateway drug.” Enforcement of laws against marijuana possession, use and sale result in racial inequities in arrest and prosecution of perpetrators. A New York Times editorial on Oct. 11 noted that an equal percentage of blacks and whites use illegal drugs, but blacks are arrested three times as often.

  • Islam rule brings fighting and killing

    Published: Sat, Oct 18, 2014

    Lutheran Bishop Michael Girlinghouse (Point of View, Oct. 12) decries “the anti-Muslim sentiments surging in the aftermath of Alton Nolen’s beheading of a woman in Moore.” He later says Islam is a peaceful, proactive religion. But Islam is more than a religion. It’s also a political system, establishing a government founded on Sharia law. The majority of the Koran prescribes rules for dealing with kafirs (unbelievers) rather than any religious matters. As for Islam being a “peaceful, proactive religion,” everywhere that Islam rules it’s accompanied by fighting and killing. That’s certainly not “peaceful.” The bishop intends “proactive” to be a positive thing. But a proactive Muslim is trying to convert all

  • Seniors need to study Medicare options

    Published: Sat, Oct 18, 2014

    Seniors and other Medicare beneficiaries should be aware that this year, perhaps more than any year in the past, is an important one to pay attention to their Medicare coverage options during the open enrollment period (Oct. 15-Dec. 7). The Affordable Care Act brings with it notable changes to Medicare, from more preventive care benefits to changes in costs. Beneficiaries need to understand both the upside and downside of such changes, to best evaluate their options during open enrollment. Adding to the challenge of this year’s Medicare changes is broader confusion around the ACA itself. A UnitedHealthcare survey conducted last year found that 76 percent of people ages 60 and older say they have a “fair” or “poor”

  • Court's primary allegiance is to politics, not the Constitution.

    Published: Sat, Oct 18, 2014

    In response to Bob Lawrence (Your Views, Oct. 10), the Founders did set apart the judiciary so that it wouldn’t be subject to the passing fancies of demagogues and the demands of the majority. However, the Constitution never mentions judicial review of laws. Marbury v. Madison (1803) was the first case where the Supreme Court “interpreted” the Constitution by reading something that wasn’t there. In the last hundred years, “progressive” judges have warped the Constitution to an unrecognizable degree, allowing members of Congress to use the Commerce Clause to usurp more power to themselves.

  • 90-year-old veteran thankful for trip to Washington, D.C.

    Published: Wed, Oct 15, 2014

    As a 90-year-old veteran of World War II and the Korean Conflict, I was lucky enough to make the recent Oklahoma Honor Flight to Washington, D.C. I viewed the war monuments with awe and sadness; each monument was different, yet conveyed unseen messages of strife, destruction, blood, mangled bodies and death. When I looked at the World War II monument, I thought of five good soldiers from my squad who didn’t return. As I strolled through the grounds, I imagined I wasn’t alone. The monuments are majestic and stand as a reminder of a proud nation that sacrificed its valuable citizens in the cause of justice. Congratulations and thanks to all those involved in planning the trip; the arrangements, bus and plane connections were

  • 'Party of No' is welcome label

    Published: Wed, Oct 15, 2014

    The GOP should welcome the label of “The Party of No.” As in, no new taxes, no increase in the national debt, no delays in decreasing the national debt, no decrease in military strength, no social programs that promote dependence on the government, that destroy self-reliance and personal pride, no increase in government rules and regulations that interfere with our freedom, no more destruction of our Constitution and no open borders.

  • Share the roads with bicylists

    Published: Wed, Oct 15, 2014

    Rude, lawless A carload of senior citizens in a black Lexus at May and Grand recently cut in front of my daughter and me while we were on our bicycles heading to Lake Hefner. We had a right to be on the road. We obeyed the law by being in the westbound lane, while the Lexus driver broke the law by sitting in a right-turn-only lane and then cutting directly in front of us as the light turned green. Sidewalks are for pedestrians. The roads that the shiny black car uses are to be shared with cyclists. The driver could have caused serious harm had he clipped the side of our bikes or startled us with his horn blaring. How would he feel if someone did this to his daughter or granddaughter? Such rudeness and blatant disregard for

  • Two simple suggestions to lowering Oklahoma's teen birthrate

    Published: Mon, Oct 13, 2014

    Oklahoma has the dubious distinction of having one of the top five teenage birthrates in the United States. Furthermore, we’re working overtime to restrict abortion. If we’re serious about eliminating abortion, we need to make it unnecessary. To make that happen, we must find a way to prevent unwanted and unplanned pregnancies. Here are two simple suggestions: First, we must educate our children on sexual function and prevention of pregnancy at an earlier age, certainly before puberty. Second, we must make contraception cheaper and more readily available to all. Abstinence should be encouraged and emphasized; realistically, though, it can’t be the only method of prevention. Approximately half of Oklahoma’s deliveries are to

  • Listen to administrators, retain ban on guns on campus

    Published: Mon, Oct 13, 2014

    Regarding “College officials tell lawmakers to retain campus ban on guns” (News, Oct. 9): A classic error made by armies, governments and businesses is a failure of decision makers to communicate with those “in the trenches” who perform the tasks and who must live with policies made by others. Experienced administrators and security personnel at state universities have clearly indicated to the legislators that they consider allowing the open carry of firearms a bad idea. The reasons, most of which are obvious, have been enumerated by others, including The Oklahoman. Now it’s up to the Legislature to listen and to abandon the potential legislation. An alternative would be for lawmakers to do an on-site study of the

  • What is Oklahoma City doing to meet growing demand on infrastructure?

    Published: Mon, Oct 13, 2014

    I moved to Oklahoma City from Texas several years ago to attend law school and was happy to stay in the growing metro to begin my legal career. I bought a home near SW 104 and have commuted to a job in north Oklahoma City for three years. Most of my daily drive requires the use of Interstate 44. Over the past few years, I’ve noticed an increase in traffic volume during rush hour. My commute time has more than doubled. I-44 has become an unpredictable gauntlet for workday travel. A minor car accident can add 30 minutes or more to a morning drive. Perhaps this is par for the course for life in a growing city; however, I worry that the current infrastructure isn't sufficient to handle and/or sustain the projected growth of the metro

  • State Sen. Connie Johnson's honesty appreciated

    Published: Mon, Oct 13, 2014

    Kudos to state Sen. Connie Johnson, Democratic nominee for U.S. Senate, for her debate with the Republican nominee, U.S. Rep. James Lankford. Johnson clearly articulated her views and where she stands on serious issues. I’m a lifelong conservative. I won’t vote for Johnson, but I appreciate her honesty. Too often, candidates for office, especially those on the left, try to obfuscate and hide who they really are. Many decisions of importance are decided not by right and wrong, but how it will affect the poll numbers. It’s nice to hear someone say, “This is what I believe, vote for me” and then let the voters decide.

  • Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt due thanks

    Published: Sun, Oct 12, 2014

    I hope Kirk Alan Jones (Your Views, Oct. 4) hasn’t been in Western Europe in his 26 years away from Oklahoma. There, everyone expects the government to provide them with most things they need. The results are devastating taxes, slow to negative GDP growth and high levels of unemployment, which of course means more people needing more things. Obamacare, in very plain language, provides subsidies only through health exchanges created by the states. President Obama and Democrats in Congress did this to force states to create their own exchanges. However, most states declined. Realizing his mistake, Obama decided he needed to change the law. But this would require another vote in Congress, based upon that pesky old parchment, the

  • Wake up, America, and smell the bacon!

    Published: Sun, Oct 12, 2014

    Barack Obama says “no boots on the ground.” In other words, the president has announced that although the American military exists to protect this country, under his command the military won’t be used to thwart a horrible and growing threat to America. Neither does Obama allow the NSA, FBI or CIA to monitor America's mosques. He sent 4,000 American soldiers to help fight Ebola in Africa because we had two or three casualties from the virus, but he won't send soldiers to fight evil terminators who have killed more Americans than Ebola has and are adamantly committed to killing us all. Muslim fanatics have announced that they intend to take over this country. Our generals are giving Obama good advice about it, but he ignores

  • Get veterinarians to handle executions

    Published: Sun, Oct 12, 2014

    Regarding the apparent inability of Oklahoma’s prison system to humanely execute condemned prisoners: Why don’t we hire a couple of local veterinarians? They successfully put animals to sleep on a routine basis without any of them making the headlines for botching a euthanasia.

  • Texting while driving reaches epidemic proportions

    Published: Sun, Oct 12, 2014

    Epidemic proportions For just a second, close your eyes and think of someone you love with all your heart. It may be a son or daughter, husband or wife — someone you love with every fiber of your being. Now think of your loved one killed by something so ridiculous as a person texting while driving. That’s my reality. My daughter Heather was killed by a texting driver. Texting while driving has reached epidemic proportions in the United States. Every year we lose more than 3,000 of our loved ones needlessly because of this dangerous practice. It’s time for Oklahoma to pass a bill that would ban texting while driving.