Top Stories


  • An Easter reminder

    Published: Sun, Apr 20, 2014

    Easter reminds us that more than 100 prophesies in historical Jewish writings were fulfilled by Jesus Christ. Seven hundred years before Christ, Isaiah prophesied that God’s “righteous servant” would be “bruised for our inequities.” He would be “scourged for our healing” and “wounded for our transgressions.” He would be martyred “for the sins of many.” Mohammed described Christ as the greatest prophet after himself, while Christ prophesied he himself would be crucified and resurrected after three days. Christ’s disciples historically testified that they and 500 other witnesses had seen the resurrected Christ “by many infallible proofs.” Many were willingly martyred declaring that truth. No man dies under

  • Drug misuse isn't just from 'doctor shopping'

    Published: Sun, Apr 20, 2014

    Regarding Oklahoma’s prescription drug misuse issue, we might consider looking for the reason the drugs are so available, which is leading to the level of overdoses. Due to the massive level of drug access, people are getting drugs in more settings than any patient monitoring program alone would impact. In addition, doctors aren’t the final link in the drug delivery system. We might screen patients by a source such as Social Security numbers, thereby creating a system that would check all prescriptions filled. We’d know when a prescription was provided and by whom. Let’s keep in mind that most patients are using drugs correctly. Those seeking drugs illegally should be the ones a negative consequence be developed for.

  • Oklahoma City doctor saved my life

    Published: Sun, Apr 20, 2014

    “Medicare pays 35 doctors more than $1M each” (Tulsa World, April 11), on release of records of Medicare payments to doctors, seems to be a negative review of those doctors. As many senior citizens on Medicare know, reimbursements to health care providers are way below regular insurance payments. Thus, the problem of so many doctors no longer accepting Medicare patients stems from the fact that Medicare patients, in some cases, actually cost the doctors money. I praise those who continue to care for Medicare patients. I owe my life to one of the Oklahoma City physicians listed. Dr. Aleda Toma saved my life when I was diagnosed with lung cancer in late 2012. Toma and her nurses and staff were the most competent, caring

  • Political lies need to be handled by civil court

    Published: Sun, Apr 20, 2014

    Regarding “Issues of political lies goes to high court” (Associated Press, April 17): As the plaintiff who won a libel suit in 1997 against former state Rep. Wallace Collins (now the Democratic Party state chairman), I certainly believe that lies in a political campaign are wrong. However, I hope Oklahoma never adopts an Ohio-type law that makes false statements about a candidate a criminal act. I don’t want some district attorney picking and choosing which candidates to file criminal charges against. The civil courts, not the criminal courts, are the place for this type of dispute.

  • We demand answers from Washington!

    Published: Sat, Apr 19, 2014

    The current talk about Russia is disturbing. Barack Obama points his finger at Vladimir Putin and says that Putin is disrespecting the integrity and sovereignty of the Ukrainian people. Yet Obama projects onto Putin what Obama himself has been doing to the people of the United States. Why are so many Americans so quick to jump to the defense of the Ukrainians yet don't do so with regard to their fellow Americans? What Obama is doing is disgraceful. He speaks out of both sides of his mouth. He goes on and on about the Ukrainians, yet we had four people dead from the Benghazi incident and no answers. Eric Holder speaks of himself being disrespected, yet he doesn't pay respect to the American people about the IRS scandal, Fast &

  • Nothing new of consequence to report

    Published: Sat, Apr 19, 2014

    Ditto to Leonard Pitts Jr. (Commentary, April 13) who put into print what many of us have been thinking regarding CNN’s coverage of Malaysia Airlines Flight 370. It’s not that we don’t care about the fate of that flight or, moreover, the poor souls who were on board. We do. It’s the constant reporting on CNN when there is nothing new of consequence to report. Of course, one can always change channels. But when one wants to tune in to some news without waiting for network and affiliate reports at their regular intervals, CNN usually provides an adequate alternative. But not during the past month. Instead, we get a constant repeat of information we’ve already heard. CNN: Please put news back in your news.

  • A bill or law by any other name...

    Published: Sat, Apr 19, 2014

    If government programs, bills and laws were named according to what their effects would be, the National Labor Relations Act would be the “Union Members Can Force Employers to Pay Unreasonably High Wages and Provide Unreasonably Generous Benefits Which Will Cause Inflation Which Will Nullify the Pay Raises and Will Make it So Hard for American Companies to Compete with International Companies That Some Will Go Out of Business But Will Provide Lots of Union Money Being Donated to Democrat Politicians Act.” The Environmental Protection Act would be known as the “Drive Conservative-Supporting Companies Out of Business Act.” This same name could be given to the Internal Revenue Service Restructuring and Reform Act.

  • House Bill 2807 keeps things in check

    Published: Sat, Apr 19, 2014

    “Oklahoma cities fear losing authority to keep their neighborhoods liveable” (News, April 8) seems to disparage House Bill 2807 as legislation that prevents cities from creating zoning that helps citizens. In reality, the article exposes the determination of municipalities to regulate land use. The article further showed the dire need for municipalities to have checks and balances (due process) in place to ensure that officials won’t abuse their power. HB 2807 doesn’t restrict zoning as long as due process is followed. Especially revealing is the one-sided focus of the article as it advocated for cities and their desire to restrict the private property rights of Oklahomans without mentioning any abuses of municipal power.

  • Prioritizing children's education over cultural center

    Published: Fri, Apr 18, 2014

    If I were a thinking man, I’d have to weigh carefully using any type of state funds for an American Indian museum versus education. If I were a smart man, I’d realize the choice isn’t as simple as one or the other. There is tremendous benefit and prestige to each. If I were a man concerned for the future of our children and grandchildren (and for those of us a bit long in tooth who need future generations to be as educated and capable as possible), I’d have to hope this parcel of money would be diverted to education. If I were a legislative man, I would look to the future of all Oklahomans.

  • High-stakes testing in schools is senseless

    Published: Fri, Apr 18, 2014

    Students recently began taking state tests. For third-graders this may be, unfortunately, the highest stakes test they will take during their K-12 education. This is the first year these scores are being used to determine promotion to fourth grade. As an informed parent, I find this law and other laws that attach high stakes to the results of one test to be a gross misuse of assessment. As I’ve talked with those knowledgeable in education, the message I get is clear and overwhelming: Basing any major decision on the results of a single test doesn’t fit with what’s known about effective evaluation or authentic learning, especially as it relates to young kids.

  • Hassling old people for drug use is a waste of money

    Published: Fri, Apr 18, 2014

    Regarding “Possible compromise is reached on ‘doctor-shopping’ legislation” (News, April 11): I recently visited my doctor for an annual health care follow-up. After going through the normal routine, I was advised that new laws concerning drugs containing narcotics now required me to sign quarterly a paper stating that I have been advised of the laws on dangers of use and mishandling of drugs and that a violation could result in arrest or other action. I take one or two prescription pain pills on six-hour intervals as needed for pain, no more than eight daily. Some days, one or two is all I require. I felt like I was being treated like a 72-year-old drug user or dealer.

  • Test run is needed

    Published: Fri, Apr 18, 2014

    Curt Roggow’s “Wind power no longer an ‘alternative energy’” (Point of View, April 13) said, “We currently generate more than 3,000 megawatts of wind energy. That’s enough to power nearly a million homes.” But part of the sentence is always missing — the part that says “…when the wind blows.” I’d like to know more about the end game. You know, like 50 years from now on a cold, calm winter night. Are the house lights on, supper cooking and the TV showing the news? Or is the house dark and the kids out looking for wood to burn for the living room fire? Somebody has a plan for us. I'd just like to know what it is. Perhaps we should first have a test run of the concept in Washington, D.C.

  • Conflict will likely become national pastime

    Published: Fri, Apr 18, 2014

    Two widely recognized principles of the liberal doctrine are equal rights and individual rights. Equal rights are best demonstrated in the ever-present dedication to income redistribution. In the area of individual rights, public prayer has been singled out as objectionable. The redistribution issue is thrust on those who are said to have earned too much. In the name of equal rights, they’re deprived of a portion of income that they believed they had a right to earn in the first place. But equal (or at least more equal) rights prevail because it exceeded some fair, but arbitrary, threshold.

  • Compounding insurance losses

    Published: Wed, Apr 16, 2014

    I’m a homeowner with required homeowners insurance through a nationally known agency. Last year I had the misfortune of filing two small claims, one for water damage and the other related to a burglary just a month after the first claim. Combined, the two claims totaled less than $10,000. My agent made no effort to inform me that if I filed the second claim, I’d probably lose my coverage with the current insurer. Since I didn’t know this, I filed the claim. Isn’t that why I pay for insurance in the first place, for coverage of a loss? Six months later I got a letter from my insurer informing me that my policy wouldn’t be renewed due to filing two claims in the same calendar year. I was then forced to secure coverage

  • Some pastors lead gay community astray

    Published: Wed, Apr 16, 2014

    Regarding “Waiting to wed” (Life, April 14): The Rev. Tamara Lebak of All Souls Unitarian Church said she wants to show gay couples that some faith communities don’t condemn them or those they love. How sad for the gay community when Christians, specifically pastors, tell them that it’s a wonderful event to sin. These people and these pastors are leading the gay community away from the greatest love of all — God’s eternal love! Sin separates us from God. To knowingly encourage someone to sin is wrong. They want to share in intimate human love but at the cost of God’s greater love. God loves everyone. We are all sinners. Telling these sinners that they aren’t sinning is like telling a thief that he can continue

  • 'Whosovever killed a person…'

    Published: Wed, Apr 16, 2014

    It’s been a year since the Boston Marathon tragedy, which the perpetrators claimed was for the protection of Islam from the U.S. If this religion needs protection from anyone, it’s from the deranged minds and unholy tactics of men like these who distort the teachings of a religion that values peace above all else. The Koran clearly states, “Whosoever killed a person … it shall be as if he killed all mankind.” Those who truly follow this religion commit acts of kindness and condemn acts of violence. Example: the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community, which is holding a blood drive at Boston City Hall in order to remember those affected by the tragedy.

  • An automatic advantage for tribes

    Published: Wed, Apr 16, 2014

    My son and I recently made a trip to southeastern Oklahoma and stopped at the Choctaw Travel Plaza in Atoka. We purchased the usual traveler’s fare of soft drinks and sandwiches. I noticed when we checked out that we weren’t charged any sales tax. I’m not any part Indian. Nor is my son. Keeping in mind what the city of Shawnee is going through with the Citizen Potawatomi Nation over the Fire Lake grocery store, I reasoned that (while this may not be the only factor) no retailer, including Costco, wants new locations in an area where the competition has an automatic advantage on prices.

  • Who's benefiting from the tax cut?

    Published: Wed, Apr 16, 2014

    The views of Bob Steinerd (Your Views, April 5) should be applauded, not only by those involved in education, but by every citizen of Oklahoma. That this state ranks far below others is an embarrassment for us and a tragedy for our children. Obviously the plan the state has devised isn’t producing desirable results. It’s time to embrace Common Core standards. Also, we must pay teachers a wage that will attract the best talent to their profession. There is none more honorable or necessary. Perhaps we need a tax increase rather than a tax cut.

  • Be good stewards to prairie chickens, an Oklahoma icon

    Published: Wed, Apr 16, 2014

    It’s misleading to claim that drought is the cause of the plummeting populations of the lesser prairie chicken. Most wildlife experts, including the Sutton Avian Research Center in Bartlesville (a leader in research on both lesser and greater prairie chickens), would agree that habitat loss and degradation is by far the leading cause of the decline of both prairie chicken species in Oklahoma and across their ranges. Prairie chickens are adapted to such things as drought, fire, predators and many other threats. What they aren’t adapted to is human intrusion such as wind turbines, high tension electrical towers, roads, fences, oil and gas wells or any other man-made structures.

  • Closure of residential care centers is national disaster

    Published: Mon, Apr 14, 2014

    In response to Julie Rinehart (Your Views, April 5): I am a physician and the father of two profoundly retarded sons who required 24-hour nursing care for their entire lives. They were in large residential centers and got superb medical care. Unannounced visits were made at all hours of the day and night to determine their level of care. Community-only advocates have wanted to close residential centers for the past 40 years. The mantra of the medically fragile individuals having “the right to live in community homes with well-trained caregivers, but (where) they can thrive and do well in the community” is misleading and false. My sons had immediate, high-level medical care around the clock in the residential center. This would