• Ridiculous image of Satan

    Published: Sun, Aug 9, 2015

    “Satanic group seeks new home for monument” (News, July 29) is without a doubt the most ridiculous thing I’ve heard in my 81 years. If Satan looked like the image depicted by the artist, Satan wouldn’t have gotten through the gate to the Garden of Eden. God said, He made Satan, “full of wisdom and perfect in beauty.” I suggest that Lucien Graeves, the Satanic Temple spokesman who is looking for a place to put this bronze work, put it in his front yard. He won’t need to buy any candy on Halloween.

  • MAPS for Roads needed

    Published: Sun, Aug 9, 2015

    I would like to propose the next turn for our city sales taxes be shifted to a MAPS for Roads. Next to our water system, our city roads may be the most-used part of our city infrastructure by the highest percentage of our population. It may also be the least appreciated for its impact on our daily lives. Oklahoma City residents spend a considerable sum each year on vehicle maintenance and repairs due in part to the overall poor condition of our city’s roads. With excellent roads, a corporate relocation shopper just might take away an overall “great” feeling from a visit to our fair city.

  • Community Clinics are more capable than Planned Parenthood

    Published: Sun, Aug 9, 2015

    Obamacare was to supply all medical care for all citizens who don’t have private health insurance. Therefore, why is it necessary to have Planned Parenthood in our communities? Perhaps Democrats continue to vote in favor of funding Planned Parenthood because it’s mainly a lobbying entity that supports Democratic candidates with large donations. Community clinics with higher moral standards than Planned Parenthood are more than able to care for women’s health needs.

  • Oil spill precautions needed

    Published: Sun, Aug 9, 2015

      According to “Gushing Into Cushing” (Business, Aug. 2), Oklahoma is home to the country’s largest commercial oil storage — 57.7 million barrels. Apparently, the storage tanks are close to full because future oil contracts are worth more than the price of oil being delivered now, which leads to the storage of oil for economic reasons. The article made me think about tornados and all the recent earthquakes in our state.

  • Planned Parenthood should be investigated

    Published: Sat, Aug 8, 2015

    Five videos clearly demonstrate the reaping and marketing of human body parts as a byproduct of the abortion industry’s leading abortion supplier, Planned Parenthood. The callous attitudes of the doctors involved are only overshadowed by the lack of coverage of this story by major media. It should have been on the front of every newspaper and the leading story on every television news broadcast. We should be asking how the harvesting of human body parts can take place if this is truly “fetal material” and not a human baby. The U.S. Senate voted down a bill to defund Planned Parenthood. I praise the efforts of Rep. Tom Cole, R-Moore, and Sen. James Lankford, R-Oklahoma City, in trying to redirect Planned Parenthood money to

  • A beautiful welcome at Union Bus Station

    Published: Sat, Aug 8, 2015

    I know some of my friends will think the demolition of Stage Center across the street was against all that is holy, but the tear that comes to my eye is the end of Union Bus Station. When my best friend and I came to the University of Oklahoma in 1964, we took a Trailways bus from Washington, D.C., to Oklahoma City. While our parents were willing to fly us here, my friend and I thought it would be fun to travel by bus — one of life’s early lessons on the list of bad decisions. Union Bus Station was our initial welcome to Oklahoma City.

  • That's funny, Harry Reid

    Published: Sat, Aug 8, 2015

    During the recent U.S. Senate debate over defunding Planned Parenthood, due to that organization’s grisly practice of selling the body parts of aborted fetuses, Sen. Harry Reid, D-Nev., said the Republican Party had “lost its moral compass.” That statement would be laughable if it wasn’t so pathetically sad.

  • A little off

    Published: Sat, Aug 8, 2015

    Regarding “Does law fail to pay it forward for teachers?” (News, Aug.

  • Seems like duplication of services by sheriff's deputies

    Published: Sat, Aug 8, 2015

    In “Council questions jail plan” (News, Aug. 5), Oklahoma County Sheriff John Whetsel said, “There is absolutely no duplication of services.” He also said that at any time, seven of his agency’s cruisers are on patrol but that deputies seen across the city may be ferrying mentally ill patients or serving warrants. But why are sheriff’s deputies doing traffic enforcement in incorporated areas? Why are they doing drunken driving checkpoints in incorporated areas? These sure seem like duplication of services. I realize Whetsel inherited a mess in the jail, and I have much respect for the men and women who serve to protect us from criminals, but misleading voters to protect empire building will not get a new jail.

  • Pitching quarters at the problem

    Published: Fri, Aug 7, 2015

    Regarding “Solid quake policies in place” (ScissorTales, Aug. 1): I had to chuckle at your report of Gov. Mary Fallin transferring $50,000 to the Corporation Commission to hire staff to track injection wells. Might as well pitch a few quarters at the problem. If they paid a staff person $10 an hour for a 40-hour week, for a year that’s just under $21,000 a year. I’m sure people will be rushing to get those jobs. Hiring two people for a year would pretty much use up that amount transferred, if they can even find people to work for what they’ll want to pay. As is the case, Oklahoma has so many needs and our current administration and Legislature can hardly meet any of them with appropriate funding.

  • Suggestions for using food stamps

    Published: Fri, Aug 7, 2015

    Since we are a nation of grossly overweight adults and children, and with so many millions of Americans on the SNAP program, why not eliminate the purchase of junk food with food stamps? If people using this resource were unable to buy things like potato chips, cookies, soda, ice cream, etc., they would have more food stamps to buy fresh produce and food like chicken and fish and whole-grain items. I’m an elderly person on food stamps and I can tell you from personal experience it’s much easier to spend a food stamp dollar on a snack cake than it is to spend an actual cash dollar. The taxpaying public might feel a little better about the SNAP program, too.

  • Post the Ten Commandments as many places as possible

    Published: Fri, Aug 7, 2015

    David Prater’s “Demonstrate our faith through deeds not words” (Point of View, July 26) refers to those who want to keep the Ten Commandments monument at the Capitol as “stone worshipers.” I do not worship a stone, but the written word of God, just as the Bible is not just a “book” but is the written word of God. Prater stated that Oklahoma is not a Godly state because of our crime and poverty rates, teen pregnancies, etc. Those statistics have been rising over the years. Not so long ago, school and movie theater killings were unheard of, condoms weren’t passed out in school, teenage girls weren’t on the pill and, although teen pregnancy was there, it was rare.

  • Why not both?

    Published: Fri, Aug 7, 2015

    Regarding the letter by Debbie Evans (Your Views, Aug. 2): She and Oklahoma County District Attorney David Prater (Point of View, July 26) basically state that the Ten Commandments should be carried in one’s heart and displayed in one’s actions. I agree. But then Evans says they should not be “relegated to a rock on public property.” My question is, why not both? Isn’t it possible to keep God’s word in our hearts and actions and have the monument also? In Deuteronomy, God commands that His people lay His words in our hearts and souls, and write them on our doors and gates. By the way, the word “gates” here in the Hebrew means government buildings.

  • Celebrating 50th anniversary of Voting Rights Act

    Published: Wed, Aug 5, 2015

      Thursday marks an important anniversary. President Lyndon Johnson signed the landmark Voting Rights Act into law on this day in 1965. The Voting Rights Act, barring discrimination based on race or ethnicity, was seen as so important that it was extended by Presidents Nixon and Ford. In 1982, President Reagan signed a 25-year extension of the VRA. Today, the Voting Rights Act doesn’t offer the same protections that it did for so many years. Two years ago, the U.S. Supreme Court gutted many of its key provisions in the Shelby v. Holder decision. Unless Congress takes action, it’s possible that 2016 will be the first presidential election in 50 years to be held without the critical protections of the VRA.

  • Off balance in most surreal way

    Published: Wed, Aug 5, 2015

    A 13-year-old lion is enticed from a protected animal sanctuary and killed for profit. Protesters want to burn the home or business of the killer and some say to hang him, too. The organizer of the hunt is in jail facing prosecution. Babies are surgically removed from the safety and protection of the womb and their parts sold for profit. The media reports that Planned Parenthood says the tone was wrong, and Congress is going to investigate.

  • Rep. Kevin Calvey needs a civics update

    Published: Sun, Aug 2, 2015

    Regarding “Small group has big sway over high court” (Point of View, July 22): State Rep. Kevin Calvey thinks the Oklahoma Supreme Court is keeping the majority in Oklahoma from having its way regarding such issues as abortion and religion. The Legislature continues to pass laws that are unconstitutional before the ink is dry. Calvey wishes the governor had the same prerogative as the president to appoint judges.  I shudder to think what would happen if that were the case. Since both the governor’s office and the Legislature are ultra-conservative, thank heavens for one entity that remains true to its obligation to protect the rights of the minority, which is what laws are enacted for. Calvey must have been absent when

  • The Oklahoman looks for ways to attack Brogdon

    Published: Sun, Aug 2, 2015

    Regarding “State Republican chairman finds new ways to make waves” (Our Views, July 28): A more appropriate headline would have been “Oklahoman finds new ways to attack Randy Brogdon.” It’s obvious that The Oklahoman is looking for ways to attack Brogdon, so it can then repeat the list of supposed sins of the Republican chairman. You run “news stories” that only quote enemies of Brogdon without giving any of his supporters an opportunity to defend him. All of this is really not about Randy Brogdon, it’s about diminishing the clout of grassroots Republicans in this state, so as to give more power to the elites of which The Oklahoman is a part.

  • Medicare was not so helpful

    Published: Sun, Aug 2, 2015

     “Regarding “Programs helping keep us healthy for 50 years” (Point of View, July 25): Medicare was invented in 1966. In less than 40 years it had broken the bank, made health care big business, made doctors rich, and driven nonprofit, religious/faith-based hospitals out of business.

  • David Prater on target with comments about Ten Commandments monument

    Published: Sun, Aug 2, 2015

    Regarding David Prater’s “Demonstrate our faith through deeds, not words” (Point of View, July 26): I am the daughter of a minister and am in total agreement with Prater concerning the placement of the Ten Commandments monument on public property. We have lost the admonition to love our neighbor as ourselves as we take sides over this piece of stone. The truths of the Ten Commandments should be carried in one’s heart and displayed through one’s action, not relegated to a rock on public property. As a taxpayer, I’m not happy that tax dollars were spent by our attorney general to attempt to persuade the Oklahoma Supreme Court to revisit its decision. This was money that could have been used on issues that more directly

  • Good guys outnumbered?

    Published: Sun, Aug 2, 2015

    If Wayne LaPierre, executive director of the National Rifle Association, is correct that only a good guy with a gun can stop a bad guy with a gun, then all these mass shootings show we have a problem. Apparently there are a lot more bad guys with guns roaming around than good guys. Carl O.




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