• Oklahoma woman becomes nationally known chef in New England

    Wednesday, April 1, 2015 at 12:00 AM

    Shannon Bard has two successful Mexican Restaurants in Maine and New Hampshire, made a lucrative appearance on Food Network’s “Kitchen Inferno” and just released a cookbook called “The Gourmet Mexican Kitchen,”


  • Correction: Arab Museum-Little Syria story

    Updated: 23 min ago

    DETROIT (AP) — In a story March 27 about a 'Little Syria' exhibit going to Ellis Island, The Associated Press, due to incorrect information from the Arab American National Museum, erroneously reported the date the exhibit will open. It opens Oct. 1, 2016, not Oct. 1 of this year. A corrected version of the story is below: Museum's 'Little Syria' exhibit going to Ellis Island Arab American National Museum's 'Little Syria' exhibit traveling to Ellis Island By JEFF KAROUB Associated Press DETROIT (AP) — The Arab American National Museum is sending its exhibition about one of the earliest Arab-American settlements to Ellis Island, the same place where many of those immigrants first set foot in the U.S.

  • Officials say Honolulu airport closures cut down on homeless

    Updated: 47 min ago

    HONOLULU (AP) — Hawaii transportation officials say a new policy authorizing the nighttime closure of areas at the Honolulu International Airport has drastically reduced the number of homeless people sleeping there. Honolulu news station Hawaii News Now (http://is.gd/SSkcsI) reports the policy was launched March 13 to discourage homeless people from camping out at the airport. Between 10 p.m. and 5 a.m. each day, overseas airport lobbies and baggage claim areas are closed. Hawaii Department of Transportation spokesman Tim Sakahara says a few dozen homeless people were told to leave the airport the first couple of nights. He says now the number is just a handful being told to leave each night.

  • Events, exhibits mark 150 years since Lincoln assassination

    Updated: 49 min ago

    April 15th marks 150 years since the death of President Abraham Lincoln. Historic sites, museums and communities around the country are hosting exhibits, performances and events to mark the anniversary. Here are details on a few. ___ THE ASSASSINATION Lincoln was shot April 14, 1865, while attending a play at Ford's Theatre in Washington, D.C. His assassin, actor John Wilkes Booth, shot him as he sat in a box looking down on the stage. Booth, a Confederate sympathizer, fled but was fatally shot several days later by a soldier. Lincoln died April 15 in a house across the street from Ford's. His body was transported by train to Springfield, Illinois, where he and his family lived for years before he became president

  • Turin Egyptian Museum gets overhaul of pharaonic proportions

    Updated: 1 hr ago

    TURIN, Italy (AP) — For the earliest Egyptologists, a trip to the Egyptian Museum in Turin was considered indispensable. The museum's new director is seeking to return the almost 200-year-old museum to its one-time prominence, boosted by an overhaul of the collection and exhibit space of near-pharaonic proportions. Museum director Christian Greco, who arrived in Turin 10 months ago, well into an ambitious five-year reinstallation of the museum's considerable treasures, aims to make the Egyptian Museum the second-most important in the world, after Cairo. "Our museum needs to be back on the international scene," Greco said in an interview in front of the ancient Temple of Ellesjia on Tuesday, as the museum showed off its five

  • DC mayor orders Indiana travel ban for city employees

    Updated: 1 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Washington's mayor has banned city employees from traveling to Indiana because of a bill that critics say would allow businesses to deny services to gay customers. Democratic Mayor Muriel Bowser issued an executive order on Tuesday banning travel to the state on official city business. The order will remain in effect until the law is repealed, clarified or blocked. Republican Indiana Gov. Mike Pence said Tuesday that he wants legislation by the end of the week to clarify that the law doesn't allow discrimination against gays and lesbians. Pence says the bill protects religious liberty.

  • Turin Egyptian Museum gets overhaul of pharaonic proportions

    Updated: 1 hr ago

    TURIN, Italy (AP) — For the earliest Egyptologists, a trip to the Egyptian Museum in Turin was considered indispensable. The museum's new director is seeking to return the almost 200-year-old museum to its one-time prominence, boosted by an overhaul of the collection and exhibit space of near-pharaonic proportions. Museum director Christian Greco, who arrived in Turin 10 months ago, well into an ambitious five-year reinstallation of the museum's considerable treasures, aims to make the Egyptian Museum the second-most important in the world, after Cairo. "Our museum needs to be back on the international scene," Greco said in an interview in front of the ancient Temple of Ellesjia on Tuesday, as the museum showed off its five

  • Fewer men and women in the US are dying from cancer

    Published: Tue, Mar 31, 2015

    (Reuters Health) – - The rate of people being diagnosed or killed by cancer in the U.S. is stable or decreasing for men and women, according to a new report. “For the main cancers, it’s really pretty much good news, incidence and mortality is decreasing,” said Recinda Sherman, an author of the new report from the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR) in Springfield, Illinois.

  • NY Gov. Cuomo bans some state-funded travel to Indiana

    Updated: 1 hr ago

    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) — New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has banned non-essential, state-funded travel to Indiana after that state adopted a religious freedom law that critics say opens the door to discrimination against gays and lesbians. The Democratic governor announced the ban Tuesday, saying it shows the state stands by "our LBGT family members, friends and colleagues." The ban will apply to all state agencies — including its public universities and colleges — and means they wouldn't be able to participate in athletic or academic events in Indiana. Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy signed a similar travel ban on Monday.

  • Passover: Welcoming gentiles for Seder a strong tradition

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — When it comes to Passover, Seder is hardly just for Jews at Lee Nelson's house. In fact, Jews are usually outnumbered. Her daughter brought along a Muslim she was seeing last year, and Nelson loves it when two particular non-Jewish friends round out her dozen or so guests. They're the ones who are bringing the brisket this year, and they've become expert at making charoset, symbolizing the mud the Israelites used for bricks when they were enslaved in Egypt. Nelson, a social media manager in Wyndmoor, Pennsylvania, is a non-affiliated Jew who follows some Buddhist teachings. In her house and many other Jewish homes, gentiles are more than welcome at Seder to munch matzo, sip the traditional four glasses

  • SixTwelve becomes center of learning, creativity, sustainability and healthy living

    By Brandy McDonnell, Features Writer | Published: Tue, Mar 31, 2015

    SixTwelve, a new nonprofit community education center in the Paseo Arts District, opened in February after five years of work to rescue and restore the former ramshackle apartment building, built in 1929.

  • Indiana governor wants changes to religious-objections law

    Published: Tue, Mar 31, 2015

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana Gov. Mike Pence says he wants legislation clarifying that a new religious-freedom does not allow discrimination on his desk by the end of the week. Pence said Tuesday he has been meeting with lawmakers “around the clock” to address concerns that the law will allow businesses to deny services to gays and lesbians. The law signed by Pence last week prohibits state laws that “substantially burden” a person’s ability to follow his or her religious beliefs. The definition of “person” includes religious institutions, businesses and associations. Pence says the law has been “grossly mischaracterized” and has put Indiana under a harsh glare.

  • Spencer Museum of Art prepares for closing for renovation

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    LAWRENCE, Kan. (AP) — The Spencer Museum of Arts on the University of Kansas campus is planning a series of events before it closes for renovations. The museum says the "Last Look" events will end with a closing party on April 12. Renovations are expected to begin in May and be completed in 2016. The first phase of the project, expected to cost $5 million, will overhaul the main lobby and central court. It will include an elevator and staircase connecting the museum's two floors of gallery space and a floor-to-ceiling window. On April 12, the museum and the university's Natural History Museum will host a "Day of Creativity," with performances, demonstrations and other activities, followed by a closing party.

  • Lithuania's Curonian Spit: Serene strand between the waters

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    NIDA, Lithuania (AP) — At the edge of the Valley of Silence, the landscape changes so suddenly it's like strolling to another continent -- from a placid, fragrant pine forest to a soaring wall of brown sand. A short but steep 52-meter (170-foot) vertical climb to the top of the Parnidis Dune -- known affectionately or humorously as "Lithuania's Sahara -- reveals a sweeping view of a remarkable and soothing landscape, the Curonian Spit. On the map, the spit resembles a stray hair rising from a child's cowlick, starting in Russia's Kaliningrad exclave and gently curving north 98 kilometers (60 miles) toward Lithuania's port city of Klaipeda, which it almost touches.

  • Endangered bighorn sheep moved to Yosemite, Sequoia parks

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — For the first time in a century, endangered Sierra Nevada bighorn sheep are back on their ancestral range and headed toward recovery, wildlife officials said Monday. During an ongoing relocation effort, dozens of bighorns have been captured with nets dropped from helicopters then moved to Yosemite and Sequoia national parks. "We've got the sheep where we want them on a broad geographic basis, which is a huge milestone," California Department of Fish and Wildlife biologist Tom Stephenson said. "We've still got to get their numbers up a bit." Thousands of the sheep once roamed the Sierra Nevada but overhunting and disease spread by domesticated sheep herds caused near-extinction.

  • Hawaii internment camp to be dedicated as national monument

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    WAIPAHU, Hawaii (AP) — Hawaii's largest internment camp where Japanese-Americans and others were held during World War II is being dedicated as a national monument. U.S. Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell will join Hawaii Gov. David Ige and other officials for a dedication ceremony Tuesday of the Honouliuli National Monument. President Barack Obama established the new monument in February. Honouliuli was opened in 1943. It was the largest and longest used World War II confinement site in Hawaii, holding 320 internees, mostly second-generation Japanese-Americans. The National Park Service says it also held German and Italian nationals. Honolulu Mayor Kirk Caldwell says preservation of the camp as a nati

  • Officials examining why plane landed short of Halifax runway

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    TORONTO (AP) — An Air Canada passenger plane landed so significantly short of the runway in Halifax that it hit a power line and knocked out power at the airport, the lead investigator said Monday. The Airbus 320 landed 1,100 feet (335 meters) short of the runway during an early Sunday morning snowstorm. It crashed into a bank of antennas and sheared off its main landing gear, nose cone and an engine before skidding on its belly. Twenty-five people were taken to the hospital and all but one has been released. Mike Cunningham, regional manager for Canada's Transportation Safety Board, said investigators are still trying to determine why Flight AC624 from Toronto landed prematurely.

  • Vail Resorts to buy Australia's largest ski area for $136M

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    BROOMFIELD, Colo. (AP) — Vail Resorts Inc. says it's planning to buy its first international ski area — Perisher in New South Wales, Australia — for about $136 million. Rob Katz, CEO of the Broomfield-based company, says the decision to buy the 3,000-acre resort is aimed at driving season pass sales and building loyalty with guests from around the world. The deal is expected to close by the end of the year. Katz acknowledged that not many people travel from the United States to Australia to ski, but he tells The Denver Post "there are huge amounts of Australians going to the U.S., and they tend to come for 10 to 14 days and travel in January, which is an off-peak time.

  • New data on breast cancer subtypes helps doctors identify risks, treatments

    Published: Tue, Mar 31, 2015

    At Ricki Fairley's annual check-up in 2012, doctors found a tiny lump. She was diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer, a less common and more aggressive form of the disease that has very few treatment options. Approximately 15 percent of all breast cancer cases are categorized as triple negative. Triple negative breast cancer can be effectively treated if the disease is caught early, and Fairley, now 58 years old, is living proof. She underwent a long course of aggressive chemotherapy and radiation and is now doing well. Triple negative is one of four subtypes of breast cancer, and a new report emphasizes how important it is for doctors to identify the risks and treatments for each. For example, triple negative cancers do not respond to certain hormonal therapies that can help other women.

  • ‘A biography of cancer’ highlights the individuality of the cancer experience

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    When PBS’ three-part documentary based on Siddhartha Mukherjee’s “The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer” wraps up, the public will have gotten to know cancer as a shadowy and deviously brilliant historical figure that has been killing and maiming men, women, and children since the beginning of recorded history. Understanding and finding cures for cancer has obsessed generations of healers, scientists, fund-raisers, politicians and entrepreneurs. As a patient advocate and someone who has watched cancer steal and forever change the lives of family and friends, I hope the film helps redirect some of today’s damaging conversations.

  • New research says Anne Frank likely died a month earlier

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    THE HAGUE, Netherlands (AP) — Teenage Jewish diarist Anne Frank likely died of typhus in a Nazi concentration camp about a month earlier than previously thought, the Amsterdam museum that honors her memory said Tuesday on the 70th anniversary of the officially recognized date of her death. Anne likely died, aged 15, at Bergen-Belsen camp in February 1945, said Erika Prins, a researcher at the Anne Frank House museum. Frank's diary about hiding from the Nazis in the occupied Netherlands during World War II was published after the war. It became an international best-seller and made her an enduring symbol of Holocaust victims.




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