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  • Teen with heart condition dies at Ala junior high

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    PELL CITY, Ala. (AP) — A school in Pell City is helping students cope with grief after one of their classmates collapsed in a classroom and died. Authorities say 13-year-old Jalin Puckett died at a hospital Thursday morning after collapsing at Duran North Junior High School in St. Clair County. He was an eighth grader. St. Clair County Coroner Dennis Russell says Puckett had a heart condition. Pell City School Superintendent Michael Barber says grief counselors and pastors responded by going to the school. Classes dismissed at the normal time but some after-school activities were canceled.

  • Drugs killed Oklahoma inmate in troubled execution

    Updated: Thu, Aug 28, 2014

    OKLAHOMA CITY (AP) — An Oklahoma death row inmate who writhed, moaned and clenched his teeth before he was pronounced dead about 43 minutes after his execution began succumbed to the lethal drugs he was administered, not a heart attack, after the state's prisons chief halted efforts to kill him, an autopsy report released Thursday says. Department of Corrections Director Robert Patton had said inmate Clayton Lockett died from a heart attack about 10 minutes after he ordered the execution stopped. It hadn't been clear whether all three execution drugs administered to Lockett had actually made it into his system, but the independent autopsy performed for the state determined they did.

  • Do-it-yourself blood pressure care can beat MDs

    Updated: Tue, Aug 26, 2014

    CHICAGO (AP) — "Do-it-yourself" blood pressure measurements and medicine changes work better than usual doctor-office care in some patients, a study of older adults in England found. Those who did their own readings at home and adjusted their medicine as needed had healthier blood pressure levels after a year than those who got standard doctors' care. Self-care patients weren't completely on their own — any changes they made were part of a treatment plan previously OK'd by their doctors. But the patients didn't need to consult their doctors every time they increased the dose if it was part of the original treatment plan.

  • Oklahoma mental health conference helps families build connections across the state

    jean Williams | Updated: Mon, Aug 25, 2014

    This year’s Peer Recovery and Wellness Conference will bring together local experts to discuss some of newest trends in mental health services.

  • It’s vegan vs. cavemen as cardiologists square off on nutrition

    Updated: Mon, Aug 25, 2014

    CHICAGO — Dr. Kim Williams thought he followed a heart-healthy diet: He avoided red meat and fried foods. He ate his chicken breast without the skin. Then in 2003, the Chicago cardiologist realized his level of LDL, the so-called “bad” cholesterol, was too high. Inspired by a patient’s success with a plant-based diet, Williams began using “meat substitutes” for protein. Within six weeks, he says, his LDL level plummeted almost by half into the healthy range. Now a firm believer in the vegan way of eating — no meat, fish, eggs or dairy — Williams is about to step into a prominent leadership role as president of the American College of Cardiology.

  • Oklahoma Watch: Q&A with Michael Brose, executive director of the Mental Health Association Oklahoma

    BY ANGELA CHAMBERS, Oklahoma Watch | Published: Sun, Aug 24, 2014

    Oklahoma Watch: Mental Health Association Oklahoma, based in Tulsa, is now the state’s most prominent nonprofit to focus on mental health services beyond the local level.

  • San Antonio police have radical approach to mental illness: Treat It

    BY JENNY GOLD, Kaiser Health News Staff Writer | Published: Sun, Aug 24, 2014

    San Antonio and Bexar County have completely overhauled their mental health system into a program considered a model for the rest of the nation. Today, the jails are under capacity, and the city has saved $50 million over the past five years.

  • When love is not enough, class for caregivers of individuals living with a mental illness helps

    jean Williams | Updated: Fri, Aug 22, 2014

    Matt Mashore credits his mother and her education for creating an environment that facilitated his recovery from a mental health crisis.

  • Coroner: Illinois student dies of heart disease

    Updated: Fri, Aug 22, 2014

    O'FALLON, Ill. (AP) — The St. Clair County coroner says southwest Illinois junior high school student who died after suffering a medical emergency during a basketball practice had heart disease. The Belleville News-Democrat reports (http://bit.ly/1vpIALy ) coroner Rick Stone identified the 13-year-old boy as Demetrius Simpson on Thursday. Stone said an autopsy conducted Thursday revealed the eighth grader died of hereditary heart disease. District 90 Superintendent Douglas Wood says Simpson went to the bathroom during training Wednesday at Fulton Jr. High School for his basketball club and didn't come back. He says Simpson was found there later in distress and was taken to a hospital. A funeral service for Simpson wil

  • Deaths from stroke and heart disease are down

    Updated: Tue, Aug 19, 2014

    That's according to a new study from the Yale School of Medicine, which examined data on more than 34 million fee-for-service Medicare patients 65 and older. Researchers found that, between 1999 and 2011, the rate of hospitalization for heart attack dropped by 38 percent and the rate of hospitalization for ischemic stroke fell 33.6 percent. The risk of dying within a year of being hospitalized for a heart attack fell 23 percent, and the risk of death from stroke a year after hospitalization fell 13 percent. The study's lead author, Dr. Harlan Krumholz, said that given such factors as increased public awareness of heart attack and stroke risks and better hospital care, it's not surprising that outcomes of these illness are imp

  • Mental health education class for parents can reduce family stress

    jean Williams | Updated: Mon, Aug 18, 2014

    Becoming educated about mental illness and available resources can improve outcomes and reduce stress on caregivers.

  • Perspective: The Importance of Accessible Over-The-Counter Naloxone

    K. Lanktree | Updated: Mon, Aug 18, 2014

    It is not dangerous. It has no potential for abuse. If administered to someone who is not at risk of overdose, they will generally experience no side effects. Worst case scenario it does nothing. Best case scenario it saves a life.

  • Robin Williams to star in 'Legend of Zelda' video game?

    Richard Hall | Published: Mon, Aug 18, 2014

    An online petition urging Nintendo to immortalize Robin Williams in a “Legend of Zelda” video game has caught the company’s attention. Williams, who died last week, named his daughter after the title character, Zelda, because he loved the video game series so much. Nintendo responded earlier today to the petition and had this to say: […]

  • Fan suffers heart attack during 49ers game, dies

    Updated: Mon, Aug 18, 2014

    SANTA CLARA, Calif. (AP) — A man who collapsed during the San Francisco 49ers' debut game at Levi's Stadium has died. Stadium staff responded to a cardiac emergency during the third quarter of the 49ers' preseason opener against the Denver Broncos on Sunday, the Santa Clara Fire Department said. The man received CPR and was rushed to a hospital, where he was pronounced dead. His name was not released. The 49ers issued a statement Sunday night offering condolences to his family and friends. The team's 34-0 loss to the Broncos and 80-degree heat drove thousands of fans to leave the new stadium midway through the game. Team officials told the San Jose Mercury News (http://bit.

  • What's it like: To suffer a mental health crisis

    By Jaclyn Cosgrove, Staff Writer | Updated: Sun, Aug 17, 2014

    Symptoms of a mental health crisis can include neglect of personal hygiene; dramatic change in sleep habits; weight gain or loss; decline in performance at work or school; noticeable mood changes, such as irritability, anger, anxiety or sadness; and withdrawal from routine activities and relationships.

  • Why eating disorders have the highest mortality rate of any mental illness

    jean Williams | Updated: Thu, Aug 14, 2014

    Robin Williams' death reminds us that serious mental illness can end tragically, but the health risks of mental illness are not just limited to suicide. The mental health disorder that takes the most lives is anorexia nervosa.

  • Mom jailed over truancy died from heart failure

    Updated: Thu, Aug 14, 2014

    READING, Pa. (AP) — A mother of seven who was jailed over her children's truancy and then was found dead in her cell died of natural causes, a coroner ruled. The Berks County coroner's office released its findings on 55-year-old Eileen DiNino on Thursday. An autopsy revealed that DiNino's high blood pressure contributed to heart failure and that fluid in her lungs also was a factor. DiNino, of Reading, 60 miles northwest of Philadelphia, was found dead in her jail cell on June 7, halfway through a two-day sentence. She had been jailed for failing to pay about $2,000 in truancy fines and court costs accrued since 1999 in cases involving several of her children, most recently her boys at a vocational high school.

  • Mom jailed over truancy died from heart failure

    Updated: Thu, Aug 14, 2014

    READING, Pa. (AP) — A mother of seven who was jailed over her children's truancy and then was found dead in her cell died of natural causes, a coroner ruled. The Berks County coroner's office released its findings on 55-year-old Eileen DiNino on Thursday. An autopsy revealed that DiNino's high blood pressure contributed to heart failure and that fluid in her lungs also was a factor. DiNino, of Reading, 60 miles northwest of Philadelphia, was found dead in her jail cell on June 7, halfway through a two-day sentence. She had been jailed for failing to pay about $2,000 in truancy fines and court costs accrued since 1999 in cases involving several of her children, most recently her boys at a vocational high school.

  • Study questions need for most people to cut salt

    Updated: Wed, Aug 13, 2014

    A large international study questions the conventional wisdom that most people should cut back on salt, suggesting that the amount most folks consume is OK for heart health — and too little may be as bad as too much. The findings came under immediate attack by other scientists. Limiting salt is still important for people with high blood pressure — and in fact, a second study estimates that too much sodium contributes to up to 1.65 million deaths each year. The studies both have strengths and weaknesses, and come as the U.S. government is preparing to nudge industry to trim sodium in processed and restaurant foods. The first study's leader, Dr. Salim Yusuf of McMaster University's Population Health Research Institute in Ha

  • LOL: If alcohol labels told the truth

    Richard Hall | Published: Wed, Aug 13, 2014

    If alcohol labels told the truth, what would they say? One redditor decided to answer that question: View the entire collection.