• Dubai plans to build 3-D printed office building

    Yesterday

    DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Fast-growing Dubai, where something new is always being added to the skyline, may have found a way to make construction move even faster. The Gulf commercial hub on Tuesday announced plans to add the world's first office building made using three-dimensional printer technology to its collection of eye-catching buildings. Mohammed al-Gergawi, the United Arab Emirates' minister of Cabinet affairs, said the project is part of a broader effort by the seven-state federation to embrace cutting-edge technology and make it a global hub for innovation.

  • Iraq: Bombs inside, around Baghdad kill at least 8 civilians

    Yesterday

    BAGHDAD (AP) — Iraqi officials say a series of attacks in Baghdad and in two towns near the capital has killed at least eight people. Police officials say the deadliest among Tuesday's attacks was in the town of Mahmudiyah, about 30 kilometers (18 miles) south of Baghdad. They say a bombing there killed three civilians and wounded 10. The officials say two bombs went off in Baghdad's northern Hurriyah and western Ghazaliyah neighborhoods, killing a total of three civilians and wounding 15. And in the town of Madain, about 20 kilometers (14 miles) southeast of Baghdad, a bomb killed two civilians and wounded six. In Baghdad, officials found two bodies with shots to the chest and head.

  • Syrian government airstrike kills 17 in insurgent-held town

    Yesterday

    BEIRUT (AP) — Activists say a Syrian government air raid has killed at least 17 people and wounded many others in a northwestern town. The Local Coordination Committees says the attack on the town of Ihsim killed 17 people and wounded dozens. The Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said 18 were killed, including four members of the same family. Syrian airstrikes carried out by warplanes and helicopters have killed thousands of people in recent years. The U.N. says that Syria's civil war has killed more than 220,000 people and wounded at least a million since the conflict began in March 2011.

  • Turkey concerned by reports of fasting bans on Uighurs

    Yesterday

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — Turkey says it has conveyed "deep concerns" to China over reports that minority Chinese Uighur Muslims were being prevented from worship and fasting during the Muslim month of Ramadan. In a mildly worded statement issued Tuesday, the Turkish Foreign Ministry said that the Turkish public was "saddened" by the reports and that Turkish concerns were relayed to the Chinese ambassador in Ankara. The Uighurs complain of heavy restrictions by the Communist Party, such as bans of fasting by party members, civil servants, teachers and students during Ramadan, as well as generally enforced bans on children attending mosques, women wearing veils and young men growing beards.

  • Syria puts into circulation new 1,000-pound note

    Yesterday

    BEIRUT (AP) — The Central Bank of Syria has put into circulation a new 1,000-pound banknote, one that doesn't include the image of President Bashar Assad's father and the country's former president, Hafez Assad. Governor Adib Mayaleh's statement, carried by the state news agency SANA, says the move is part of efforts to improve the paper currency in circulation. The new note started circulating on Tuesday. Mayaleh insists the new banknote will not affect the rate of inflation but that it will simply replace 70 billion worn-out banknotes that are being withdrawn. Instead of the late president's image, the new note depicts an ancient Roman theater in southern Daraa province.

  • German prosecutors charge man with Islamic State membership

    Yesterday

    BERLIN (AP) — German prosecutors say they've charged a 22-year-old German-Turkish dual national with murder and membership in a terrorist organization on allegations he fought with the radical Islamic State group in Syria. Prosecutors said Tuesday that Kerim Marc B., whose last name wasn't given in accordance with German privacy laws, is alleged to have joined the Islamic State group after traveling to Syria via Turkey in 2013. They say he received military training in Syria and fought in multiple engagements, "killing at least one person." Prosecutors say he temporarily returned to Germany in early 2014, went back to Syria last July and resumed fighting.

  • A year after Gaza war, Hamas entrenched as frustration grows

    Yesterday

    GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) — Emad Firi is angry. During last summer's Israel-Hamas war, a shell slammed through the roof of his house and shredded his right leg. Unable to work, Firi's son now drives his taxi but the family struggles to survive. The 50-year-old blames Israel, but also the Islamic militant group Hamas which has ruled Gaza since a violent takeover in 2007. In the Hamas era, the tiny territory has endured three wars with Israel and a crippling Israeli-Egyptian border blockade that keeps most of its 1.8 million residents trapped. "Who is not angry about this difficult situation?" Firi said, waiting at a rehabilitation clinic to finally to be fitted with an artificial leg. But the people of Gaza won't rise

  • Saudi denies Yemen rebel claims of Scud strike

    Yesterday

    RIYADH, Saudi Arabia (AP) — The Saudi military says no Scud missiles have struck the country, rebutting claims by Yemeni rebels that they launched a missile targeting the kingdom. Yemen's Houthi rebels said late Monday that they launched a Scud at a Saudi military base that is located about 700 kilometers (435 miles) southeast of the capital, Riyadh. The Saudi Ministry of Defense said in a statement Tuesday that the military base in question is secure and that no missiles had reached it. The military also said Tuesday that a soldier died the previous day from wounds sustained in a Houthi strike launched from Yemen against the Saudi border region of Najran.

  • The Iran deal: A look at what it does and problems remaining

    Yesterday

    VIENNA (AP) — World powers and Iran are back in nuclear talks, and this round may be the deciding one. After nearly a decade of international diplomacy, negotiators are working past Tuesday's deadline, trying to reach a final agreement that would curb Iran's nuclear activities for a decade and put tens of billions of dollars back into the Iranian economy through the easing of financial sanctions. But significant obstacles remain. Iran says it won't allow inspectors to visit military sites and interview scientists to ensure Iranian compliance. Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, the supreme leader, also says he wants all economic sanctions lifted before the deal is signed, while the U.S.

  • UN condemns fighting by Syria and rebels in Golan Heights

    Updated: Mon, Jun 29, 2015

    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The U.N. Security Council is condemning the fighting and use of heavy weapons by Syrian armed forces and opposition fighters in the area that has separated Syrian and Israel forces since 1974. A resolution co-sponsored by Russia and the United States and adopted unanimously by the council on Monday calls on parties to the Syrian conflict to halt all military action in the area of separation. It warns that military activities in the zone can escalate Syrian-Israeli tensions. The resolution extends the mandate of the 750-strong peacekeeping force on the Golan Heights until Dec. 31. For nearly four decades U.N. monitors from the force have helped enforce a stable truce between Israel and Syria.

  • UN extends Darfur peacekeeping force despite Sudan protest

    Updated: Mon, Jun 29, 2015

    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — The Security Council on Monday unanimously approved a one-year extension of the joint U.N.-African Union peacekeeping force in Sudan's western Darfur region where conflict is intensifying, rejecting the Sudanese government's demand that the troops leave. A resolution adopted by the U.N.'s most powerful body keeps the size of the force the same — 15,845 military personnel and 3,403 international police. It orders the troops to concentrate on protecting civilians, ensuring the delivery of humanitarian aid, mediating conflicts and supporting a peace process.

  • As Kurds gain in Syria, Turkish govt ponders military action

    Updated: Mon, Jun 29, 2015

    ANKARA, Turkey (AP) — As Kurdish rebels in northern Syria rack up wins against the Islamic State group, Turkish media is abuzz with talk of a long-debated military intervention to push the Islamic militants back from the Turkish border — a move that will also outflank any Kurdish attempts to create a state along Turkey's southern frontier. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan chaired a National Security Council meeting Monday which covered developments in Syria and pro-government newspapers were rife with purported proposals, ranging from loosening the rules of engagement to give Turkish troops a freer hand to fire into Syria, to a tanks-and-troops invasion aimed at occupying a 110-kilometer (70-mile) long, 33-kilometer (20-m

  • Car bomb explodes near military hospital in Yemeni capital

    Updated: Mon, Jun 29, 2015

    SANAA, Yemen (AP) — A car bomb exploded behind a military hospital in the Yemeni capital on Monday, causing dozens of casualties including civilians, security officials said. Yemen's rebels, known as Houthis, later said in an official statement that they had fired a Scud missile at Saudi Arabia, in what would be the second such attack since fighting between a Saudi-led coalition and the rebels began in the spring. The security officials, close to the Houthis, said the blast in Sanaa targeted the homes of several Houthi leaders, but did not give further details on how many people were killed or wounded. Houthis cordoned off the area after the explosion and prevented anyone from entering as ambulances rushed to the scene.

  • Palestinian striker to be freed, Israelis injured in attacks

    Updated: Mon, Jun 29, 2015

    RAMALLAH, West Bank (AP) — A Palestinian held by Israel for the past year is ending a 55-day hunger strike and in exchange will be released in two weeks, his wife and an advocacy group for prisoners said Monday. Meanwhile, in the West Bank, a Palestinian woman stabbed a female Israeli paramilitary police officer in the neck and seriously injured her, police said. And in the evening three Israelis were injured when shots were fired at them from a car in the West Bank, the Israeli military said. Rights groups have warned that Khader Adnan, 36, a senior activist in the militant Islamic Jihad group, is near death. His wife Randa said Monday, after visiting her husband in an Israeli hospital, that he lost a lot of weight and "lo

  • Bomb kills Egypt's top prosecutor as he drives to work

    Updated: Mon, Jun 29, 2015

    CAIRO (AP) — A car bomb killed Egypt's chief prosecutor Monday in the country's first assassination of a senior official in 25 years, marking what could be an escalation in a campaign by Islamic militants toward targeting leaders of a crackdown on the Muslim Brotherhood. Hisham Barakat led the prosecution of members of the Brotherhood and other Islamists, including former President Mohammed Morsi, who was overthrown by the military in July 2013. The courts have been handing out mass death sentences against them in trials harshly criticized as lacking due process. Monday's assassination of the 65-year-old Barakat came on the eve of the second anniversary of the mass demonstrations against Morsi that led to his ouster.

  • Israeli navy peacefully intercepts Gaza-bound vessel

    Updated: Mon, Jun 29, 2015

    JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel's navy intercepted a Swedish vessel attempting to breach a naval blockade of the Gaza Strip early Monday and brought it to an Israeli port, where it said the foreign activists would be questioned before they are sent back to their home countries. The military said that after exhausting all diplomatic efforts, the government ordered it to block the vessel. Israeli naval forces boarded the Marianne and searched it in international waters without needing to use any force, the military said. The ship was carrying about 20 activists, including Israeli Arab lawmaker Basel Ghattas and former Tunisian President Moncef Marzouki. Three other ships that were part of the original flotilla reversed course before

  • For world, limited options if Iran talks fall apart

    Updated: Mon, Jun 29, 2015

    CAIRO (AP) — The Iranian nuclear talks are playing out in classic fashion: A self-imposed deadline appears to have been extended due to stubborn disputes, with the sides publicly sticking to positions and facing internal pressure from opponents ready to pounce on any compromise. Should the talks actually collapse, the alternatives are not appealing. The war option that the United States has kept on the table has few fans, and the world community does not seem willing to impose truly crippling sanctions. A dangerous period of uncertainty looms. Which way it goes may depend on which side needs a deal the most. Iran might seem the weaker party, with sanctions harming its economy.

  • Emirati court issues death sentence in killing of American

    Updated: Mon, Jun 29, 2015

    DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — A court in the United Arab Emirates sentenced to death a woman convicted of murdering an American teacher with a butcher knife in the bathroom of an upscale Abu Dhabi mall, the state news agency WAM reported Monday. Attacks against foreigners are rare in the UAE, which is home to the popular tourist destination of Dubai and where expatriates far outnumber Emirati citizens. Police said at the time of the attack in December that the attacker had targeted her victim based on nationality alone in an attempt to create chaos in the country. She had also planted a bomb outside another American's house that was discovered before it detonated.

  • France: Israeli-Palestinian conflict can explode at any time

    Updated: Mon, Jun 29, 2015

    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — France's foreign minister warned Monday that the Israeli-Palestinian conflict can explode "at any moment" and the Islamic State extremist group can interfere at any time. Laurent Fabius told a group of reporters that "if and when it explodes, it's very, very, very problematic for the whole region and for the world." Fabius said that "every radical group," especially in Gaza, can take advantage of the deadlocked peace process, and it would be lamentable if the Islamic State group — "the most radical of the radicals" — used this as a pretext for violence.

  • Police use tear gas to stop fighting at Hungary refugee camp

    Updated: Mon, Jun 29, 2015

    BUDAPEST, Hungary (AP) — Hungarian police used tear gas to stop a fight among hundreds of refugees at a camp in an eastern city, officials said Monday. The disturbance began when a Turkish man took the Quran from another Turkish man and stomped on it, which led to hundreds of others temporarily living at the refugee camp in Debrecen to join the dispute, police spokesman Lt. Denes Dobo said on state television. Dozens of those involved in the fighting exited the refugee camp, setting fire to garbage containers and hitting cars and buses with sticks and stones before the arrival of over 150 police officers in riot gear. One police officer was hit by a rock and suffered superficial wounds.




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