• Clinton is raising millions more for Democrats than Sanders is

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    WASHINGTON — Both candidates for the Democratic presidential nomination opened accounts to raise money for the party. Here’s the tally so far: Hillary Clinton, $46 million; Bernie Sanders, $0. Clinton, a former senator and secretary of State, has headlined a half-dozen fundraisers — one at movie star George Clooney’s home, another at a Radio City Music Hall concert with pop star Katy Perry — to raise money for national and state parties. Sanders, an independent senator, has not organized any fundraisers for the party, nor has he raised any money through emails or ads. He has accused the Democratic Party of favoring Clinton in the contest and, in recent days, has accused her of spending money she raises for the party

  • Film Review A Bigger Splash

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    This image released by Fox Searchlight shows Tilda Swinton, right, and Matthias Schoenaerts in a scene from "A Bigger Splash," in theaters on May 4.

  • In viewer-interactive ‘Late Shift’ the characters all live happily ever after … or however else you want

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    Early in the film “Late Shift,” Matt, a student on his way to a night job, faces an easily relatable dilemma: help a lost tourist with directions and risk being late to work or ignore the man and hop on a waiting subway train. Here is where you would expect director Tobias Weber to show the audience the outcome of Matt’s decision as the story unfolds. Matt’s choice, however, is up to you, the viewer. In fact, you control every major plot turn in the film. “Late Shift,” created by CtrlMovie, a small studio in Switzerland, and written by Weber and Michael Robert Johnson, best known for Guy Ritchie’s “Sherlock Holmes,” may be the world’s first fully realized choose-your-own-adventure film.

  • Movie news: Monster movies take over Universal, 'Star Wars' star gets Shakespearean

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    Monster mash Disney has Marvel Comics and “Star Wars.” Warner Bros. has DC comics and the Harry Potter spinoffs. What’s left for Universal Pictures? Monsters. The studio is already at work on a reboot of “The Mummy” for June 2017, with Tom Cruise starring as a modern-day special ops soldier and Sofia Boutella of “Kingsman: The Secret Service” as the title monster. Now, according to Deadline Hollywood, Russell Crowe is in talks to join in as Dr. Jekyll and his out-of-control alter ego, Mr. Hyde, with possibilities of his own spinoff. The next monster remake, due in April 2018, may be “The Invisible Man” starring Johnny Depp. That’s the H.G. Wells story about a scientist who finds a way to become invisible

  • BRIEF: Leon Bridges premieres documentary 'This Is Home' on his website

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    You might recall three months ago, during the Grammys, a Squarespace commercial featuring Leon Bridges (and glimpses of Fort Worth) was shown during the national television broadcast. Earlier today, a documentary, directed by acclaimed photographer Danny Clinch and tied to those Squarespace ads, premiered on Bridges’ website (although you can also watch it below). Titled This Is Home, it runs about 22 minutes, features interviews with several familiar faces — Jeff Dazey, Andrew Skates, Rambo, and his mother, Lisa Sawyer, among others — and retraces Bridges’ rise from hopeful singer-songwriter to Grammy-nominated phenomenon. (It is worth watching purely to see the moment where Bridges and his mother have a small dance

  • Film-Captain America-Chadwick Boseman

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    This image released by Disney shows, from left, Chadwick Boseman as Panther, Paul Bettany as Vision, Robert Downey Jr. as Iron Man, Scarlett Johansson as Natasha Romanoff, and Don Cheadle as War Machine in a scene from "Marvel's Captain America: Civil War.

  • Review: In Paris-set 'Dheepan,' a timely refugee thriller

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    NEW YORK (AP) — French director Jacques Audiard is a curious combination of art-house auteur and genre filmmaker, a brazen showman and gritty naturalist. He makes tender and brutal movies that recast themselves as they twist their way toward unpredictable finales. To suit tales of transformation (his specialty), he switches genres mid-movie like a character changing wardrobe. In "Dheepan," which won the Palme d'Or at the Cannes Film Festival last year, he travels from war movie to migrant drama to film noir, adding an atypically happy ending, to boot. Audiard's restless shifts can be jarring, but the intensity of his film doesn't waver; the power of "Dheepan" is in its volatility. It begins in fire.

  • Official: Teacher violated policy with racially charged word

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — A white Utah teacher violated school district policy by using a racially charged word in his junior high class, an official said. Weber School District spokesman Nate Taggart said appropriate administrative action was taken against history teacher Douglas Barker. Taggart declined to provide further details, citing the teacher's privacy rights. Barker used the N-word before showing his class of 8th graders the Civil War movie "Glory," Taggart said. "That is not appropriate language to use in any classroom context," Taggart said. Barker said in an email Wednesday that he was making sure his students understood why the word would be used in the film. He said he told his students that it is not

  • Chicago mayor hopes court appeal can save Lucas museum

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    CHICAGO (AP) — Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is turning to a federal appeals court in his increasingly desperate attempt to keep filmmaker George Lucas from building his museum in another city. Emanuel's office says in a news release Wednesday that it's filing a petition with a federal appeals court to dismiss a lawsuit filed by the parks advocacy group Friends of the Parks, which opposes the lakefront museum. The announcement comes a day after the wife of the "Star Wars" creator said that the legal fighting over the proposed museum has prompted her and Lucas to start looking for a site in another city. Emanuel says that if the court doesn't dismiss what he calls a frivolous lawsuit, "the museum will abandon its efforts

  • People Rumer Willis

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    FILE - In this June 25, 2015, file photo, Rumer Willis arrives at the LA Premiere of the documentary "Amy" in Los Angeles. Willis posted a photo to her Instagram account on May 3, 2016, that she says was Photoshopped to make her jaw look smaller.

  • Abby Wambach to join ESPN as analyst and contributor

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    Retired U.S. soccer star Abby Wambach is joining ESPN as an analyst and a contributor. Wambach, the leading career scorer in international soccer, will cover the European Championships in France and the Rio Olympics in August. But her role won't be limited to soccer: She will work across multiple platforms including ESPN Films and shows including "Outside the Lines," according to the network. "Talking and reporting on things that I'm passionate about really, really was the selling point to me," Wambach told The Associated Press. "Because I don't want the rest of my life to be based on the fact that I played soccer. I want to be able to venture and learn about different things.

  • Rob Reiner, son explore a dark time in 'Being Charlie'

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    WEST HOLLYWOOD, Calif. (AP) — "I maybe didn't handle it the best way," said Rob Reiner of his son's struggles with drugs. It's a story that stayed out of the tabloids while it was happening, but by the time Nick Reiner was 18 years old, he had already cycled in and out of nine treatment facilities with bouts of homelessness and relapses in between. "I listened to a lot of people who had a desk and a diploma," Rob Reiner said. "I didn't really think about my kid and what he needed." Seated in a leather armchair in a cozy corner of his West Hollywood office on a recent afternoon, Rob Reiner spoke candidly about that difficult time. He's had a few years now to process what he and his family went through.

  • It's Star Wars Day: May the 4th be with you

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    It's not a national holiday, yet it might be an intergalactic one. May the Fourth, as in "May the Fourth Be With You" has become a day to celebrate all things Star Wars, especially following last year's revival of the series with "Star Wars: The Force Awakens." One the stars of the current Star Wars trilogy, Daisy Ridley, appeared in a YouTube video surrounded by some of the series' characters to deliver well wishes from the cast of "Star Wars: Episode VIII," which is set for release next year. Like many Star Wars characters, "May the Fourth" comes with an interesting origin story. One of the earliest known references to the day followed the May 4, 1979, election of Margaret Thatcher as Britain's prime minister, accordi

  • Movie review: Third ‘Captain America’ film entertains relentlessly

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    Near the beginning of “Captain America: Civil War,” the superheroes known as The Avengers sit for a tongue-lashing by Secretary of State Thaddeus Ross. He’s angry about the major cities the crew has destroyed in various movies, including New York City; Washington, D.C.; some place called Sokovia; and now Lagos, Nigeria. Ross, played by William Hurt in a stern suit, wants to rein in the Avengers. “For the past four years,” he fumes, “you’ve operated with unlimited power and no supervision!” You could say the same about Disney-Marvel, the studio team that formed in 2009 and has been laying waste to the box office ever since. In “Captain America: Civil War,” the title hero and his friends are accused of being

  • Movie review: ‘A Bigger Splash’ has deceptive depth

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    No less than his ravishing 2009 melodrama “I Am Love,” Luca Guadagnino’s “A Bigger Splash” is a swooning cinematic appeal to the senses — two hours of al fresco lovemaking, gorgeous scenery and simmering erotic warfare. Which is not to suggest that the movie short-circuits rational thought or inquiry; on the contrary, its teasing, sun-drenched surfaces are likely to prompt a series of questions. When was the last time you sampled a freshly made ricotta? What’s the going rate for a villa rental in Pantelleria? When exactly did Ralph Fiennes become one of the greatest actors working today? Those inclined to measure a movie star’s worth in Oscar nominations might point to Fiennes’ mid-’90s breakthrough with “Schi

  • Cyndi Lauper adds country record to her multifaceted career

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Pop singer, songwriter and Broadway musical composer Cyndi Lauper added a little country twang to her signature Queens accent. Her country and western covers album "Detour," which is out on Friday, brings another unexpected twist to a career that has included music, theater, television, movies, wrestling and activism. A musical chameleon, she's won two Grammys, an Emmy and a Tony , but despite all the success, she said she's not as savvy at the art of business. "Much to the chagrin of my family, I have not been the greatest businesswoman," Lauper said during an interview in Nashville, Tennessee. "I was always art for art's sake. But you have to think of it like a business. It's art and commerce and s

  • Eddie Murphy welcomes baby girl as ninth child

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Eddie Murphy is now a father of nine. Murphy's publicist says the 55-year-old actor and his 36-year-old girlfriend Paige Butcher have welcomed their first child together, Izzy Oona Murphy. The baby girl was born Tuesday morning. Publicist Arnold Robinson says both mother and daughter are doing well. Murphy has eight other children, including five with ex-wife Nicole Mitchell, who was married to Murphy from 1993 to 2006. This is the first child for Butcher.

  • 2016 summer movie preview: Here come the sequels, superheroes and remakes

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    Ah, summer! The time of year is almost upon us when the days are long, the kids are out of school and cinemas are packed with original, artful films unlike any you’ve seen before. OK, that last part isn’t really true. Sequels, remakes and superheroes are a year-round business for the movie industry, but they’re particularly abundant during the summer months, because that’s when movie-going attendance is at its highest. Beginning with “Captain America: Civil War,” which opens Friday, your local multiplex is about to be invaded by a tidal wave of new films, many of which will seem familiar, because Hollywood loves nothing more than repeating a proven formula.

  • People Patton Oswalt

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    FILE - In this Jan. 12, 2012 file photo, Patton Oswalt, left, and his wife Michelle Eileen McNamara arrive at the 17th Annual Critics' Choice Movie Awards in Los Angeles. Oswalt has authored a touching essay for Time that was published on May 3, 2016, nearly two weeks after McNamara's unexpected death.

  • Captain America says he isn't afraid of superhero fatigue

    Updated: Wed, May 4, 2016

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — "Captain America: Civil War" star Chris Evans isn't worried about superhero fatigue at the cineplex. The actor, who dons Captain America's mask and shield a fifth time for the latest Marvel movie, says the studio knows how to satisfy its fans. "Luckily, the movie is good," Evans said. "If you were all rallying around and working toward and sweating for a bad product, I think that's how you begin the initiation of disillusionment and apathy... As long as Marvel is making good movies, I'll still have the excitement and enthusiasm and commitment to work for them." Lower than expected box office for DC Comics' "Batman v. Superman: Dawn of Justice" earlier this spring spurred some speculation that audien




Advertisement