• Movie review: Spandau Ballet gets its due in “Soul Boys” documentary

    Updated: 12 hr ago

    Spandau Ballet launched the “New Romantics” movement in pop’s New Wave, the music that blended punk and disco and fashion and paved the way for the “hair metal” and hip hop that followed as reactions to it. But Duran Duran, Culture Club and Rick Astley followed and stole their thunder and outlasted the Islington quintet. So “Soul Boys of the Western World,” the documentary about their rise and fall, serves as a corrective, as well as a time machine trip without the hot tub back to the era of jackboots and jodhpurs, berets and ballads, an era in pop much derided for its MTV friendly fashions, its “soaring synthesizers,” synth drums and synthetic fabrics.

  • Richard Mize: Sneak peak of Symphony Show House

    Updated: 12 hr ago

    Two words: vodka cellar. Or maybe vodka closet. In any case: Lotsa vodka — lotsa cool-looking bottles of vodka, artfully arrayed with LED lighting and mirrors in their own alcove-that-once-was-a-closet off the media-room-that once-was-a-bedroom. It’s impressive — and maybe I was blinded by visions of martinis and movies dancing in my head. I was so struck I didn’t even think to snap a picture of it. Which means you’ll have to go see it at 15000 Wilson Road in the gated Northwestern Estates neighborhood northwest of NW 150 and Western Avenue. –richard mize, real estate editor, the oklahoman/newsok.

  • New albums: Blur; Speedy Ortiz; Michael Des Barres

    Updated: 14 hr ago

    BLUR “The Magic Whip” (Parlophone ***1/2) Blur had no intention of making a new album when the 1990s Brit-pop stalwarts headed out on a reunion tour of Asia in 2013. But when the cancellation of the Tokyo Rocks festival left them with five free days in Hong Kong, the Damon Albarn-fronted band headed to the studio — including chief collaborator Graham Coxon, who played on only one song on the band’s last full-length offering, 2003’s Think Tank. Starting with those sessions, “The Magic Whip” — the title refers to soft-serve ice cream, not an S&M implement — was recorded piecemeal.

  • Music industry, looking to enhance sales, is doing away with traditional U.S. release date of Tuesday

    Updated: 14 hr ago

    For Kanye West fans, the arrival of a new record is a given. It’s got a name, “So Help Me God.” Producers are attached. He executed his prerequisite stage-storming, attention-grabbing viral moment at the Grammy Awards. Paul McCartney, we have been informed, is heavily involved. West appeared on Coachella stages twice in two days. But like many high-profile recent releases by Beyonce, Kendrick Lamar, Rihanna and others, one key question remains: When will it arrive? Next week? A week from Thursday? Tonight at midnight? Will he wait until the summer? (And will it arrive first via Spotify, Tidal or iTunes?) Who knows anymore? The release schedule is a mess, and further change is afoot in the form of a pending switch in the

  • Expats try phones, social apps to connect to quake-hit Nepal

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — After the earthquake hit Nepal, Prem Raja Mahat spent a sleepless night at his Baltimore home, trying again and again to reach his son, who was visiting friends and family back in Mahat's home country. "My wife was crying, crying so much, 'My son is not here, keep calling, keep calling.' All night I called, but I could not get through," he said. "I could not work. I could not sleep. Everyone felt so bad." Power outages and communications problems have made life agonizing for the nearly 6 million Nepalese who live abroad — or about 22 percent of the population. They try desperately to reach loved ones through cellphones and global messaging apps, only to be met with silence or fleeting connections

  • Today in History

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    Today is Wednesday, May 6, the 126th day of 2015. There are 239 days left in the year. Today's Highlight in History: On May 6, 1965, after a Rolling Stones concert in Clearwater, Florida, was cut short by rowdy fans, Keith Richards composed the opening guitar rift of "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction," which he co-wrote with Mick Jagger. (The song was recorded less than a week later, and the single was released in the United States on June 6.) On this date: In 1840, Britain's first adhesive postage stamp, the Penny Black, officially went into circulation five days after its introduction. In 1889, the Paris Exposition formally opened, featuring the just-completed Eiffel Tower.

  • Nepalese band holds concert despite homeland's deadly quake

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    BOULDER, Colo. (AP) — A Nepalese band took the stage for a planned concert in Boulder despite hearing the news that thousands of their countrymen had been killed by a natural disaster. KCNC-TV in Denver reports (http://cbsloc.al/1OY3JEY) that the rock band played at the Glenn Miller auditorium on Sunday night and took the opportunity to raise money for their homeland following a 7.8 magnitude earthquake that shook the country Saturday. Band members told KCNC-TV that they arrived in the U.S. days before the earthquake and are eager to get home. The band's drummer said his family fears damage from aftershocks and has been sleeping outside under a tent. He said he felt that god or another higher power sent the band

  • A look back for Monday, April 27, 2015

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    25 years ago APRIL 26, 1990 CAPE CANAVERAL — After years of delay and a last-minute snag, the Hubble Space Telescope was freed from the shuttle Discovery on Wednesday and, glinting in the sunlight, drifted into orbit on its 15-year search for new worlds. Mission specialist Steven Hawley released Hubble from the end of the shuttle’s 50-foot long mechanical arm after a delay in getting one of the telescope’s solar wings unfurled. APRIL 26, 1990 WICHITA — Dave Antrim was frustrated.

  • Expats try phones, social apps to connect to quake-hit Nepal

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — After the earthquake hit Nepal, Prem Raja Mahat spent a sleepless night at his Baltimore home, trying again and again to reach his son, who was visiting friends and family back in Mahat's home country. "My wife was crying, crying so much, 'My son is not here, keep calling, keep calling.' All night I called, but I could not get through," he said. "I could not work. I could not sleep. Everyone felt so bad." Power outages and communications problems have made life agonizing for the nearly 6 million Nepalese who live abroad — or about 22 percent of the population. They try desperately to reach loved ones through cellphones and global messaging apps, only to be met with silence or fleeting connections

  • O Fidelis releases galactic 'Posthuman Project' music video (Middle of Nowhere Debut)

    Nathan Poppe | Published: Mon, Apr 27, 2015

    O Fidelis is going places. For its new “Up and Away” music video, that place is 100,000 feet into the air. This is your first chance to watch the Oklahoma-based band’s new video. Director Kyle Roberts teamed up with the americana folk duo and latched a GoPro onto a weather balloon that traveled into the […]

  • Elvis Presley's planes to remain at Graceland

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — It looks like Elvis Presley's airplanes are staying at Graceland after all. Graceland released a statement Sunday saying the Lisa Marie and the Hound Dog II, two custom-designed airplanes once owned by Presley, will remain permanently at the Memphis tourist attraction centered on the life and career of the late singer. The announcement ends confusion about the future of the planes, once used by the King for travel to performances after he bought them in the 1970s. The larger plane, a Convair 880 named after Presley's daughter Lisa Marie, is like a customized flying limousine, complete with a large bed, a stereo system, conference room and gold-plated bathroom fixtures. It was renovated after Pres

  • Elvis Presley's planes to remain at Graceland

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    MEMPHIS, Tenn. (AP) — It looks like Elvis Presley's airplanes are staying at Graceland after all. Graceland released a statement Sunday saying the Lisa Marie and the Hound Dog II, two custom-designed airplanes once owned by Presley, will remain permanently at the Memphis tourist attraction centered on the life and career of the late singer. The announcement ends confusion about the future of the planes, once used by the King for travel to performances after he bought them in the 1970s. The larger plane, a Convair 880 named after Presley's daughter Lisa Marie, is like a customized flying limousine, complete with a large bed, a stereo system, conference room and gold-plated bathroom fixtures. It was renovated after Pres

  • Thousands coming to Enid this weekend for Tri-State

    Updated: 18 hr ago

    ENID, Okla. — After all these years, Tri-State Music Festival still is going strong. The festival will celebrate its 83rd year on Friday with 19 bands participating in the parade and more than 7,000 students — making up 66 bands total — coming to compete. Tri-State has changed over the years, board member Tim DeClerck said. “Part of the change is because of the change in the attitude of students and directors, changes of interest in different kinds of music, and Tri-State has tried to change with the years,” he said. “We don’t bring in the 11,000 kids we brought in 1960. “What hasn’t changed is the interest these kids in grade school through high school bring to Enid, and the intense focus they h

  • Slaton couple build Southwestern-themed house of straw

    Updated: 19 hr ago

    SLATON — Huff and puff all you want, but Ronny and Rita Peek’s straw house won’t blow down. In fact, you might not even know its base product if not for a wall adornment next to the front door. The “truth window” contains a square-shaped piece of glass in place of the stucco that covers the rest of the walls and ceilings. Look inside, and you’ll glimpse its grassy foundation. “The walls really are made of straw bales,” Rita said. A full thousand of them, to be exact. Each is 18 inches tall, 2 feet wide and 4 feet long. The couple purchased the bales from a Navajo reservation in Farmington, New Mexico. Putting them together was no tiny task. “The walls are not weight-bearing — they

  • Red Dirt Relief Fund helps Oklahoma music people in times of need

    By Brandy McDonnell, Features Writer | Published: Mon, Apr 27, 2015

    Modeled on the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences’ MusiCares Foundation, the Red Dirt Relief Fund provides an emergency safety net for Oklahomans in the music business facing financial, medical or personal hardships. Operated by an all-volunteer board, the fund has given about $24,800 in grants since 2012.

  • Bob Childers' Gypsy Cafe songwriter festival will benefit Red Dirt Relief Fund in Oklahoma

    By Brandy McDonnell, Features Writer | Published: Mon, Apr 27, 2015

    The 2015 Bob Childers’ Gypsy Cafe will bring together 55 Oklahoma singer-songwriters for a series of acoustic song swaps Wednesday at three Stillwater venues.

  • Country singer Jimmy Wayne tells his painful story to help foster children

    By Brandy McDonnell, Features Writer | Published: Mon, Apr 27, 2015

    Released last fall, Wayne’s autobiography “Walk to Beautiful” details his turbulent and tragic childhood with an abusive, bipolar mother and a series of violent stepfathers as well as the saving grace he found in the elderly couple who took him in as homeless teen. He will perform Thursday at “Songs & Stories for Oklahoma’s Kids,” presented by Deaconess Pregnancy & Adoption Services, an organization he’s worked with before.

  • Singer Jamie Barton wins the 'Heisman Trophy' of music

    Updated: Sun, Apr 26, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — The prize dubbed the Heisman Trophy for singers is going to a Georgia native with an earth-shattering voice — and an earthy style. Announced Sunday, the winner of the 2015 Richard Tucker Award is mezzo-soprano Jamie Barton. The opera star recently appeared barefoot in jeans, giggling and cradling a glass of Oregon wine — offstage, chatting with a friend on YouTube. Onstage in costume, she's being compared to the past century's finest vocalists. The $50,000 prize goes to a major young American singer. It's named after Tucker, the late tenor and Brooklyn native who started out as a cantor in synagogues.

  • Opera in Kids Tent at New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival

    Updated: Sun, Apr 26, 2015

    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Opera is as much a part of New Orleans' African-American heritage as jazz, said Givonna Joseph, whose troupe is bringing opera to the Kids Tent at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival for the fourth year in a row. The troupe was among more than 60 acts on 10 stages Sunday at the infield of the Fair Grounds Race Track. Jimmy Buffett and the Coral Reefer Band were closing the first weekend at one end of the infield while crooner Tony Bennett, 88, and Lady Gaga, 29, closed at the other. The festival, which drew 435,000 fans last year, continues Thursday through Sunday.

  • Sid Tepper, songwriter for Elvis Presley and other stars, dies at 96

    Updated: Sun, Apr 26, 2015

    Songwriter Sid Tepper, who co-wrote more than 40 songs specifically for Elvis Presley and hundreds of others performed by Frank Sinatra, the Beatles, Dean Martin, Eartha Kitt, Perry Como, Jeff Beck and many more, died Friday at his home in Miami Beach. He was 96. He died of natural causes, said his daughter Jackie. Although Tepper and his songwriting partner Roy C. Bennett wrote extensively for Presley, they never met him. All their songs for him were for his movies, including the title number for “G.I. Blues” (1960) and “The Lady Loves Me,” sung as a poolside duet with Ann-Margret in “Viva Las Vegas” (1964). By the time they wrote for Presley, Tepper and Bennett were already established songwriters.




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