• Asian stocks rise after US data calms investor nerves

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    HONG KONG (AP) — Asian stocks rose Friday as upbeat U.S. economic data lifted investors' spirits following days of stomach-churning turbulence sparked by a heavy sell-off in China. Regional markets took their lead from Wall Street, where benchmarks had a strong finish after a government report showed the U.S. second quarter economic growth was much stronger than initially estimated. That gave added encouragement to investors seeking out bargains in beaten-down shares. Japan's benchmark Nikkei 225 index led regional gains, adding 2.5 percent to 19,020.35 after lackluster monthly data on inflation and household spending raised hopes of further stimulus. The Shanghai Composite Index in mainland China rose 1.2 percent to

  • Frank E. Petersen Jr., first black Marine aviator, dies

    Updated: 6 hr ago

    BALTIMORE (AP) — Frank E. Petersen Jr., the first black aviator and brigadier general in the Marine Corps, has died. Frank E. Petersen III said his father died Tuesday at his home in Stevensville, on Maryland's Kent Island, of complications from lung cancer. He was 83. The New York Times reported that Petersen enlisted in the Navy in 1950, two years after President Truman desegregated the armed forces. The next year, Petersen entered the Naval Aviation Cadet Program, according to The Washington Post. According to a news release on the Marine Corps website, Petersen was commissioned in the corps in 1952. The Marines say Petersen served in the Korean War in 1953 and Vietnam in 1968.

  • 2 rescued from The Venetian hotel-casino's canal

    Updated: 7 hr ago

    LAS VEGAS (AP) — Two men found unresponsive in The Venetian Las Vegas resort-casino's outside gondola ride canal earlier this week are no longer in critical condition. Erica Nansen, spokeswoman with the University Medical Center of Southern Nevada, confirmed Thursday that one man was in stable condition and the other was discharged. Las Vegas Sands Corp. spokesman Ron Reese said the resort-casino's security guards had kicked the pair off the property before and they had been known to loiter in front of The Venetian on a regular basis.

  • Hawaii Supreme Court hears Mauna Kea telescope case

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    HONOLULU (AP) — Hawaii's Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a case involving building one of the world's largest telescopes on Mauna Kea. Opponents, who are against building the Thirty Meter Telescope on land that many Native Hawaiians consider sacred, are challenging a permit that would allow the telescope to be built on conservation land on Hawaii's Big Island. Lawyers delivered opening arguments in the case Thursday, and justices questioned why the state department that issued the permit did so when there were ongoing challenges to the project. The judges also discussed the impact of one more telescope on the mountain.

  • With 2 killings this week, Louisiana police deaths rising

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Police badges in Louisiana are banded with black ribbons more than usual this year, a grim reminder that officer deaths are on the rise with two killings just this week alone. Louisiana has had more job-related police fatalities in 2015 than any other state but Texas, with nine on-duty deaths in each state, according to the National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund. Law enforcers are weary of what they call "the end of the watch." Police deaths nationally also are showing an uptick this year, though not at the rate in Louisiana, where the law enforcement community is readying for two more funerals.

  • The Latest on TV shooting: Husband overjoyed wife is alive

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    ROANOKE, Va. (AP) — The latest on the on-air killing of two TV station employees in Virginia (all times local): 8:50 p.m. The husband of on-air shooting survivor Vicki Gardner says his wife lost a kidney and part of her colon, and faces three months of convalescence. Tim Gardner said in a telephone interview Thursday his heart goes out to the families of Roanoke, Virginia, television reporter Alison Parker and cameraman Adam Ward. They were killed Wednesday by gunman Vester Flanagan as they interviewed Vicki Gardner, executive director of the Smith Mountain Lake Regional Chamber of Commerce. Despite his sorrow, Tim Gardner says he's overjoyed that his wife of 40 years is alive.

  • Jury wants life sentence for man who killed 5 in Denver bar

    Updated: 8 hr ago

    DENVER (AP) — A man convicted of stabbing five people to death at a Denver bar and setting the business on fire will not be executed and instead will serve a lifelong prison sentence, a jury decided Thursday. It was the second time in a month that a Colorado jury has decided against execution for a mass killer. Earlier this month, jurors choose not to give the death penalty to James Holmes, who killed 12 people in an attack on a suburban Denver movie theater in 2012. The latest case involved Dexter Lewis, 25, who was convicted Aug. 10 of five counts of murder for stabbing five people to death in October 2012. The killings happened during a bar robbery that netted $170.

  • Obama to people of New Orleans: You inspire me, and America

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    NEW ORLEANS (AP) — Visiting residents on tidy porch stoops and sampling the fried chicken at a corner restaurant, President Barack Obama held out the people of New Orleans on Thursday as an extraordinary example of renewal and resilience 10 years after the devastation of Hurricane Katrina. "There's something in you guys that is just irrepressible," Obama told hundreds of residents assembled at a bustling new community center in an area of the Lower 9th Ward that was once under 17 feet of water. "The people of New Orleans didn't just inspire me, you inspired all of America." He held out the city's comeback as a metaphor for what's happening all across a nation that has moved from economic crisis to higher ground.

  • ACLU sues to block sweeping Nevada education funding program

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    CARSON CITY, Nev. (AP) — A Nevada education funding program that's considered the nation's broadest school choice initiative attracted its first legal challenge Thursday, with three civil liberties groups saying it violates the state constitution by releasing public funds to religious schools. The American Civil Liberties Union, its Nevada affiliate and Americans United for Separation of Church and State said they filed a lawsuit in Nevada District Court in Clark County. They're asking the courts to block implementation of the state's sweeping new Education Savings Account program, which allows parents to claim the majority of their child's per-pupil state education funds and use it toward private schooling or other qualify

  • Ag secretary promises more sage grouse spending across West

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The federal government plans to spend more than $200 million over the next three years on programs to protect greater sage grouse in Western states — regardless of whether the bird receives federal protections, U.S. Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack said. Vilsack told The Associated Press that he wants to almost double protected habitat for the elegant chicken-sized bird, to 8 million acres by 2018. He also promised more will be done to limit residential development in sage grouse habitat and to restore wetlands used by the birds. Nearly half of the roughly $211 million the government plans to invest over the next three years will go toward buying conservation easements, Vilsack said at a formal anno

  • MMA heavyweight Wren returns from Africa for a new fight

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Justin Wren re-evaluated his life less than two years ago from a Ugandan hospital bed, where he clung to life with severe cases of malaria and blackwater fever. With his body temperature fluctuating wildly, he had lost 33 pounds in five days, draining the strength from a burly, blond-bearded mixed martial artist who left his sport in search of something bigger. Wren realizes most people with any self-preservation instinct would have left Africa to recover. But he says he first traveled to the Congo after it appeared to him in a vision, providing a destination and a focus to a life consumed by drug abuse and self-loathing. The heavyweight wrestler couldn't abandon the pygmy tribes that became his adopted f

  • Police: Man pretended to be officer to get unprotected sex

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    FORT LAUDERDALE, Fla. (AP) — Authorities say a South Florida man told a prostitute that he was a police officer and that he would arrest her if she refused to have sex without a condom. The Broward Sheriff's Office reports that 22-year-old Mark William Rose was arrested Wednesday and charged with impersonating a police officer in the commission of a felony and false imprisonment. The South Florida Sun Sentinel (http://goo.gl/lXILy7 ) reports that Rose told arresting deputies he had previously used the fake officer bluff about a dozen times, with three women conceding to sex. Rose's lawyer refuted the false imprisonment charge, saying this wasn't the first time a man had lied to a woman to have sex. Rose was bein

  • Lawyer: Former franchisee alerted Subway ad exec about Fogle

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — A former franchisee alerted an executive in charge of Subway's advertising in 2008 about her concerns about pitchman Jared Fogle, according to her lawyer. Cindy Mills exchanged phone numbers with Fogle after they met at an event, said Robert Beasley, a lawyer in Florida who represents Mills. After Fogle began talking about paying for sex with minors, the lawyer said Mills alerted a regional Subway contact in Florida where her stores were based. Later, he said Mills alerted Jeff Moody, who was in charge of the Subway Franchisee Advertising Fund Trust, which handles the company's marketing. At the time, Subway's franchise advertising fund was controlled by franchisees, said Don Sniegowski, editor of Blue MauMa

  • Rubio says strength is only way to maintain peace with China

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    MIAMI (AP) — Republican presidential candidate Marco Rubio says the United States must bolster its military, push for more free trade and hold China far more accountable on human rights. Writing for The Wall Street Journal, the U.S. senator from Florida says American strength through its military, economy and morals is the only path to lasting peace and partnership with China. Rubio is expected to provide details of his China policy in a speech Friday morning in Charleston, South Carolina. He is calling on President Barack Obama to downgrade Chinese President Xi Jinping's trip to Washington next week from a state visit to a working visit aimed at blunt talk about trade and human rights.

  • Walrus leave ice, come ashore on Alaska's northwest coast

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Pacific walrus have come ashore on the northwest coast of Alaska in what has become an annual sign of the effects of climate change. "There appears to be several thousand animals up there," said Andrea Medeiros, spokeswoman for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in Anchorage. Images of the walrus were captured over the weekend by a photographer not affiliated with the agency near Point Lay, an Inupiat Eskimo village 700 miles northwest of Anchorage and 300 miles southwest of Barrow. Walrus have been coming to shore on the U.S. side of the Chukchi Sea in large numbers for about eight years. They also come to shore on the Russian side. Researchers say it's likely a result of less sea ice b

  • Million gallons of wastewater closes another beach in Hawaii

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    HONOLULU (AP) — For the second time in a week a popular Hawaii beach was closed Thursday after sewage from a treatment plant was discharged into the ocean. A million gallons of treated but not yet disinfected wastewater was discharged from the East Honolulu Wastewater Treatment plant, closing Sandy Beach and its surroundings. The closure comes a day after beaches near Waikiki were reopened following a similar issue. Hawaii American Water, the private company that runs the treatment plant, said the incident happened Tuesday after an underground electrical cable that feeds power to their chlorination system shorted out as heavy rains fell in the area.

  • Student charged in university threats, will be evaluated

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A student who Mississippi State University officials say threatened to kill himself and others will face misdemeanor disorderly conduct charges and has been referred for a mental and psychological evaluation. MSU police arrested Phu-Qui Cong "Bill" Nguyen, a freshman from Madison, after a campus alert warning of an "active shooter" prompted a lockdown. MSU Police Chief Vance Rice said Nguyen did not have a gun when they arrested him, that no shots were fired on the 20,000-student campus in Starkville, and no one was hurt. MSU spokesman Sid Salter said he didn't know if Nguyen, a computer engineering major, had a lawyer who could speak for him. The Associated Press could not locate his family members Th

  • Californians cut water without state imposing fines

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    FRESNO, Calif. (AP) — For the second straight month, Californians exceeded hefty water conservation mandates during the relentless drought without the state imposing fines, officials said Thursday. Cities cut water use by a combined 31 percent in July, exceeding the governor's statewide conservation mandate of 25 percent, the State Water Resources Control Board reported. The figure surpassed the June figure of 27 percent savings despite hot summer temperatures. The strong figures show California residents are beginning to understand the dire need to cut back in the fourth year of the drought, said Felicia Marcus, chair of the water board. "This isn't your mother's drought or your grandmother's drought," she said

  • Firefighters holding their own against giant blaze

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    CHELAN, Wash. (AP) — Officials say firefighters are holding their own against the largest wildfire on record in Washington state, even as rising temperatures and increased winds stoked the flames. The National Weather Service had issued a red-flag warning Thursday for the fires near Okanogan, saying the weather conditions had the potential to spread the flames. But fire spokesman Bernie Pineda says fire lines are holding and portions of the 450-square mile fire were actually burning back on itself because of winds. The blazes have killed three firefighters and burned at least 40 homes and 40 outbuildings.

  • Lawyer accused of coaching clients to lie awaits fate

    Updated: 10 hr ago

    CHICAGO (AP) — The question of when lawyers cross the line from zealously defending their clients to fabricating evidence is the focus of a rare trial in Chicago, where an attorney is accused of coaching defendants and witnesses to lie. As Beau Brindley's federal trial drew to a close Thursday — and before a judge began considering a verdict — a prosecutor accused the lawyer of distorting justice in at least six criminal cases. "The lies were like a virus that spread from case to case to case," assistant U.S. attorney Michael Chmelar said. The fabrications worked, he added, with Brindley securing acquittals on at least some counts in several of the cases at issue.




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