• Protests in Baltimore over man's death in police custody

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    BALTIMORE (AP) — Protesters who have been holding demonstrations almost daily this week over the death of Freddie Gray are promising their biggest march yet a day after the Baltimore Police Department acknowledged that it failed to get him the medical attention he needed after his arrest. Protesters vowed to "shut down" the city by marching through the streets and snarling traffic. The president of a black lawyers' group predicted thousands of people would turn out for the demonstration, when good weather is forecast and the Baltimore Orioles host the Boston Red Sox. "Things will change on Saturday, and the struggle will be amplified," said Malik Shabazz of Black Lawyers for Justice.

  • Rebels seize northwest Syrian town as government retaliates

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    BEIRUT (AP) — Hard-line Syrian rebel groups seized a strategic town Saturday in northwestern Syria, sending government troops fleeing after intense clashes that have seen the opposition take nearly all of a crucial province. The takeover prompted retaliatory government air raids in the town center — as many as 30 airstrikes according to one activist group — that left an unknown number of people killed and wounded. Among those wounded was a TV reporter for an opposition station who entered the town with the rebels.

  • Coyote collared after lower Manhattan police chase

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — A wily coyote is no match for the NYPD. Police collared the creature near a sidewalk cafe in downtown Manhattan on Saturday morning. The coyote was spotted shortly after 7:30 a.m. in the Battery Park City neighborhood. Officers tailed her up and down a marina and a Hudson River park for about an hour before using a tranquilizer dart to subdue her. She is being cared for at the Center for Animal Care and Control. Police say there were no injuries to humans or animals. It is unclear if the coyote was the same one that was spotted in Riverside Park on Wednesday. At least four coyote sightings have been reported in Manhattan this year.

  • Another condemned Ala inmate claiming innocence

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Anthony Ray Hinton, who spent 28 years on Alabama's death row for two murders despite his claims of innocence, walked free earlier this month after prosecutors admitted they couldn't prove his guilt. Another inmate who maintains he was wrongly convicted in a separate killing is now challenging his death sentence in a case with eerie similarities to Hinton's, down to allegations of botched ballistics evidence, a questionable eyewitness identification and the judge and prosecutor who handled both trials.

  • Frenchman's execution in Indonesia may be suspended

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    PARIS (AP) — France is stepping up efforts to save the life a Frenchman facing a firing squad in Indonesia on drug charges, amid signs that his execution may be suspended. Serge Atlaoui is among 10 foreigners slated for execution in the coming days in Indonesia. His case has drawn national attention in France, which vigorously opposes the death penalty. French Foreign Ministry spokesman Romain Nadal said Saturday the government is intensifying its mobilization and is determined to prevent the execution. Scores of people gathered in Paris and Atlaoui's hometown of Metz on Saturday to urge Indonesia to halt his execution, some shouting "Hope! Hope!" Atlaoui's fate may be on hold because of a legal complaint over the pro

  • Burundi president nominated by ruling party for third term

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    BUJUMBURA, Burundi (AP) — Burundi's ruling party on Saturday nominated President Pierre Nkurunziza to be its candidate for a third term in elections on June 26, a move expected to stoke political tensions. The party announced Saturday that Nkurunziza had been nominated unanimously and unopposed during a retreat for party leaders. On the streets of Bujumbura, Burundi's capital, armed police were immediately deployed after the announcement. Burundi's constitution stipulates that a president can only serve for two terms, but Nkurunziza's party says he is eligible for another term as popularly elected president because for his first term he was elected by lawmakers. Critics say this is not a proper interpretation of the law and

  • Appalachian nonprofit links small farmers with big grocers

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    DUFFIELD, Va. (AP) — In Virginia's southwestern tip lies a produce aggregator that's become a standout success among Appalachian nonprofits by helping farmers in remote areas sell to big grocers. Appalachian Harvest has grown to a $1.5 million business that derives only a sliver of its budget from grants while delivering vegetables to grocers including Whole Foods, Ingles and Food City. To develop its business from scratch, Appalachian Harvest has fine-tuned how it helps farmers while expanding from organic to conventional crops and learning a crash-course in trucking. Inside Appalachian Harvest's 15,000 square-foot warehouse are massive coolers and packing equipment, including a 30-foot green conveyor belt-driven mac

  • Gunmen kill prominent female activist in Pakistan

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    KARACHI, Pakistan (AP) — Gunmen on a motorcycle killed a prominent women's rights activist in Pakistan just hours after she held a forum on the country's restive Baluchistan region, home to a long-running insurgency, police said Saturday. While investigators declined to speculate on a motive for the killing of Sabeen Mahmud, friends and colleagues immediately described her death as a targeted assassination in Pakistan, a country with a nascent democracy where the military and intelligence services still hold tremendous sway. The gunmen shot both Mahmud and her mother, Mehnaz Mahmud, as they stopped at a traffic light Friday night in an upscale Karachi neighborhood, senior police officer Zafar Iqbal said.

  • Powerful earthquake strikes Nepal: Things to Know

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    A powerful earthquake struck the Nepal region on Saturday, causing widespread casualties and triggering an avalanche on Mount Everest. The key information known at this time: ___ HOW BAD IS THE DAMAGE? It's too early to tell, but early indications suggest the early figure of 1,180 people killed in four countries is likely to rise substantially in the coming days. The magnitude-7.8 quake was the worst to hit Nepal in eight decades and caused damage and fatalities in neighboring countries as well. In addition to at least 1,130 people killed in Nepal, at least 34 were killed in India, 12 in Tibet and two in Bangladesh. Two Chinese citizens died at the Nepal-China border.

  • Chokehold case questions follow NY congressional candidate

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Even if Dan Donovan prefers to talk about Iran, immigration or taxes, there's another topic the Republican congressional hopeful can't avoid: the death of Eric Garner at the hands of a police officer. The Staten Island district attorney drew national attention when a grand jury he impaneled declined to charge a white New York Police Department officer, despite a widely watched cellphone video showing him putting the black Garner in what the medical examiner later called a fatal chokehold. The outcome further fueled the debate over whether police officers are too quick to use force against minorities and if the grand jury system is too lenient on those officers accused of abusing their authority.

  • Beyond the money, storm chasers out to save people's lives

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    TUSCALOOSA, Ala. (AP) — The moment, almost 20 years later, remains crystal clear in the mind of Tommy Self. He was a volunteer firefighter in the tiny central Alabama town of Townley, about 10 miles west of Jasper. The department responded when an EF-5 tornado ravaged Tuscaloosa and Jefferson counties on April 8, 1998. As Self picks up the narrative, this is how he became a storm chaser: "My department assisted with search and rescue in the Concord area (near Birmingham). I knew right then because they didn't have hardly any warning, it was at night. I had a small child pass away in my arms. And I knew right then what I wanted to do as far as making a difference.

  • Michigan vote tests pothole angst vs. will to raise taxes

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    ANN ARBOR, Mich. (AP) — Drivers in the state that put the world on wheels are flat-out embarrassed by the state of Michigan's roads, and some are even scared. But whether they can stomach tax increases to improve the roads is in doubt. A May 5 ballot measure proposes a 1-cent sales tax hike to put an additional $1.2 billion a year into fixing deteriorating roads and bridges. Michigan and some other states have been asking voters to decide whether to raise taxes or shift revenue to pay for road needs no longer fully covered by fuel taxes. The problem is particularly acute in Michigan, which spends less on highway infrastructure, per capita, than any other state except Georgia and is a major trucking route to and from C

  • Man who shot himself outside courthouse during sex case dies

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    BRENTWOOD, N.H. (AP) — Authorities say a New Hampshire man has died after shooting himself in the courthouse parking lot while awaiting a jury's verdict on charges he sexually assaulted a piano student more than a decade ago. Seventy-five-year-old John Goodwin went on trial this week on six counts of aggravated felonious sexual assault involving a former student. The jury began deliberating the case Friday morning, about two hours before Goodwin shot himself near his car outside the Rockingham County Superior Courthouse in Brentwood. The longtime piano instructor in Atkinson was airlifted to a Massachusetts hospital. The Rockingham County sheriff's office said Saturday that Goodwin died of his injuries.

  • 'Saigon has fallen' _ a reporter's view of Vietnam War's end

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    (EDITOR'S NOTE — More than two decades of war in Vietnam, first involving the French and then the Americans, ended with the last days of April 1975. Peter Arnett, who won a Pulitzer Prize for his coverage of combat for The Associated Press and later gained fame as a CNN correspondent, has written a new memoir, "Saigon Has Fallen," about his dozen-plus years reporting on Vietnam. Arnett has recounted this period before but approaches it with a fresh perspective for the 40th anniversary of the war's end. The book is published by RosettaBooks in partnership with The Associated Press (www.ap.org/books). This is an edited excerpt, focused on the war's final throes.) ___ Artillery explosions sound a fearsome 4 a.m. wake-up call,

  • Starbucks stores reopen Saturday after computer glitch

    Updated: 4 hr ago

    SEATTLE (AP) — Starbucks was back in business Saturday after a computer outage forced thousands of its stores to close early the night before. The company said the outage was resolved Friday night after several hours. The glitch affected registers at 7,400 company-operated stores in the U.S. and 1,000 in Canada, and prompted some stores to give away drinks. "All Starbucks stores in the U.S. and Canada are expected to open for business as usual on Saturday," the company said in a statement late Friday. "We apologize to our customers for this inconvenience." Starbucks said the outage was caused by "a failure during a daily system refresh." Jim Olson, a company spokesman, stressed it was an internal issue and that no ext

  • Bill under debate would limit farm antibiotics in Oregon

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — Oregon legislators want to curb the use of antibiotics in agriculture, joining a national movement concerned that germs are becoming more resistant and causing infections in human. Proponents of an Oregon bill say the practice of farmers routinely feeding antibiotics to livestock to fatten it up and protect it from illnesses is contributing to the spread of superbugs. If the legislation passes, Oregon would be the first in the nation to mandate stricter rules on livestock antibiotics. Some farmers and veterinarians say the bill would limit them from using antibiotics to prevent disease outbreaks.

  • Liberty University at a glance

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    LYNCHBURG, Va. (AP) — The late Rev. Jerry Falwell recognized the importance of accreditation, academics and athletics when he founded what is now Liberty University in 1971, his son Jerry says. Perhaps like any upstart in a field where its competitors date themselves by centuries, not decades, the younger Falwell is quick to list the achievements of a school he has overseen since 2007. Here's a sampling: — Its net assets have grown from $100 million in 2000 to more than $1.4 billion. — Tuition is in the lowest 25 percent of all private schools. — The student loan default rate is half the national average. — The debate team has claimed an armful of national titles and has been a giant slayer, beatin

  • Public boarding school _ the way to solve educational ills?

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    BUFFALO, N.Y. (AP) — Buffalo's chronically struggling school system is considering an idea gaining momentum in other cities: public boarding schools that put round-the-clock attention on students and away from such daunting problems as poverty, troubled homes and truancy. Supporters say such a dramatic step is necessary to get some students into an atmosphere that promotes learning, and worth the costs, estimated at $20,000 to $25,000 per student per year. "We have teachers and union leaders telling us, 'The problem is with the homes; these kids are in dysfunctional homes,'" said Buffalo school board member Carl Paladino.

  • University founded in Va. by culture warrior Falwell soars

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    LYNCHBURG, Va. (AP) — The president of Liberty University credits his father, the late Rev. Jerry Falwell, for laying the foundation for the extraordinary growth of the evangelical Christian university. Located in the foothills of Virginia's Blue Ridge mountains, Liberty now claims more than 100,000 students, with most of that number reflecting distance learners. The younger Jerry Falwell says that makes Liberty the largest university in Virginia. That's a far cry from the little Baptist college that his father started in Lynchburg in 1971. President Falwell says Liberty's growth has even surprised him. The university is amid a $500 million campus building boom on its 7,000-plus acre campus.

  • As theater shooting trial opens, gun debate dwindles

    Updated: 5 hr ago

    DENVER (AP) — When a gunman opened fire inside a packed movie theater in July 2012, killing 12 and injuring 70, it did more than spread fear and heartbreak across the Denver suburbs. It helped revive the national debate over gun control. The debate gained intensity in the state five months later when a gunman killed 20 children and 6 adults at a Connecticut elementary school, resulting in Democrats to require universal background checks and ban magazines that hold more than 15 rounds. Gun control advocates boasted that they had found the formula to enact their policies in a libertarian swing state. Furious gun rights supporters recalled two state senators who supported the measures.




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