• Airstrike kills wife and child of Hamas figure

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    GAZA CITY, Gaza Strip (AP) — Hamas' shadowy military chief escaped an apparent Israeli assassination attempt that killed his wife and infant son, the militant group said Wednesday as Israel's prime minister warned that the bombardment of Gaza will continue until rocket fire out of the Palestinian territory stops. The airstrike on a home where Mohammed Deif's family members were staying — and the tough talk from Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu — came after the collapse of cease-fire talks in Cairo on Tuesday. In a nationally televised address, Netanyahu showed little willingness to return to the negotiating table after six weeks of war with Hamas.

  • Father of Norway's mass murderer asks: What if?

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — The father of Anders Behring Breivik, the Norwegian who killed 77 people in 2011, has written a book that questions his behavior as a parent. Jens Breivik, a retired Norwegian diplomat living in southern France, got a divorce when his son was only a year old and claims to have had little contact with the boy. But the new book is titled "My Fault?" On Wednesday's the Juritzen publishing house released a few quotes from the work, including this one: "I feel guilty. And I feel responsible.

  • WHO: West Africa Ebola death toll rises to 1,350

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    MONROVIA, Liberia (AP) — Riot police and soldiers acting on their president's orders used scrap wood and barbed wire to seal off 50,000 people inside their Liberian slum Wednesday, trying to contain the Ebola outbreak that has killed 1,350 people and counting across West Africa. Hundreds of the slum's residents clashed with the gunmen, furious at being blamed and isolated by a government that has failed to quickly collect dead bodies from the streets of Liberia's capital. One 15-year-old boy was injured trying to cross the barbed wire as security forces fired into the air to disperse the crowd. The World Health Organization said the death toll is rising most quickly in Liberia, which now accounts for at least 576 of the fat

  • Drug for Ebola-like virus promising in ill monkeys

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    WASHINGTON (AP) — An experimental drug saved monkeys from a virus closely related to Ebola even after symptoms began, Texas researchers reported Wednesday. A drug that targets Ebola in the same way is under development, and the study raises questions about how late after infection treatments might work. The unprecedented Ebola outbreak in West Africa has interest surging in the creation of the first drugs and vaccines for the hemorrhagic fever — but a separate report Wednesday highlights the inadequacy of counting on experimental products in the pipeline.

  • French protesters urge end to Israeli airstrikes

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    PARIS (AP) — Leftist and pro-Palestinian activists have rallied in Paris to urge Israel to end its airstrikes in Gaza, after talks toward a lasting truce collapsed. About 300 protesters gathered Wednesday near Napoleon's tomb in central Paris, waving Palestinian flags, photos of people killed in airstrikes. Some banners read "No to the massacre in Gaza." Police watched carefully and the protest wound down peacefully, unlike several demonstrations last month in France that unleashed the worst tensions between France's Muslim and Jewish communities in years. France has more Muslim and Jewish citizens than any other country in western Europe. France's government has urged a truce.

  • Former lab worker sentenced in nuke secrets plot

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — A former Los Alamos National Laboratory contractor has been sentenced to a year and a day in prison for conspiring with her physicist husband to sell nuclear secrets. The Justice Department on Wednesday announced the sentencing of 71-year-old Marjorie Roxby Mascheroni, who pleaded guilty to charges accusing the couple of plotting to communicate classified nuclear weapons data to an undercover agent who they thought was a Venezuelan government official. Her husband, 79-year-old Pedro Leonardo Mascheroni, has also pleaded guilty in the case and is in federal custody pending his sentencing. He was a scientist at the lab from 1979 to 1988. She did technical writing and editing from 1981 to 2010.

  • Oregon Democrats back legal pot, food labels

    Updated: 21 hr ago

    PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The Democratic Party of Oregon is giving its formal blessing to legal marijuana. The party announced its positions Wednesday on all seven 2014 ballot measures. Chairman Frank Dixon says in a statement that a large majority of Democrats now support legalization, and Measure 91 takes "the right approach" to regulating the drug. Democrats also supported measures requiring labels for genetically modified foods and granting driving privileges to people who can't prove they're legally in the United States. Democrats came out against only one measure. It would replace the current Republican and Democratic primaries with a top-two system that advances the top vote-getters regardless of party.

  • Dubai's Nakheel to pay $2.1 billion in debt early

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Dubai's developer Nakheel behind the famed man-made palm-shaped islands said Wednesday it is repaying 7.9 billion dirhams, or roughly $2.15 billion this month — nearly four years before the last installment is due. The indebted state developer was scheduled to repay the credit over three installments between September 2015 and March 2018. Nakheel said in a statement that it made early repayments of 2.35 billion dirhams ($640 million) in February. The remaining 5.54 billion dirhams ($1.51 billion) is being paid and cleared this month, it said. Nakheel will pay the $1.51 billion to 31 banks, of which almost $940 million will go to UAE banks and $570 million to overseas banks.

  • UAE ruler approves lengthy counter-terrorism law

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — The ruler of the United Arab Emirates approved a new counter-terrorism law that strengthens existing laws against money laundering, while also expanding penalties to include the death penalty, life imprisonment and fines of up to $27 million, state media reported Wednesday. The law, according to the state-backed The National newspaper, calls for establishing Saudi-style counseling and rehabilitation centers for people found "to be terrorism prone." Impersonating a public figure could lead to life imprisonment, the paper said. The official Emirates News Agency reported that Abu Dhabi ruler and UAE President Sheik Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan endorsed the law, but provided no further details.

  • Iran's parliament dismisses moderate minister

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    TEHRAN, Iran (AP) — In a move led by hard-line lawmakers, Iran's parliament dismissed the country's science minister Wednesday over his alleged support for pro-Western voices at universities, dealing a blow to moderate President Hassan Rouhani. The no-confidence vote against Science, Research and Technology Minister Reza Faraji Dana was a sharp rebuke of Rouhani, who was elected last year on promises of greater openness and diplomatic engagement with the West. The vote was also the first time a minister in Rouhani's Cabinet was impeached. Out of 270 lawmakers who were present at the session, 145 voted to oust Dana, 110 voted to keep him on and 15 abstained. The chamber has 290 seats.

  • US warns travelers of canceled Venezuela flights

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    CARACAS, Venezuela (AP) — Come to Venezuela and you might get a longer trip than you bargained for. The U.S. Embassy in Caracas issued an advisory Tuesday urging Americans to be careful when traveling to Venezuela because of the steep drop in airline service to the South American country. The number of seats on flights between Venezuela and the U.S. has fallen by more than half since the beginning of the year, according to the Venezuela Airlines Association. The three largest U.S. carriers — Delta, American and United Airlines — all slashed their service to Venezuela this summer. The cause: A dispute over some $4 billion in cash trapped in the socialist country.

  • Chip maker Infineon to buy California firm for $3B

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    FRANKFURT, Germany (AP) — German chip maker Infineon Technologies AG says it has agreed to pay $3 billion in cash for California-based semiconductor firm International Rectifier, which produces power-management components used in everything from cars to satellites. Infineon said in Wednesday's announcement that it's paying $40 per share for El Segundo-based International Rectifier. The deal has been approved by both boards, but must win regulatory permission and meet the approval of International Rectifier shareholders. The deal is expected to close late this year or early in 2015. Infineon, based in Munich, has 26,700 employees and makes chips for a wide variety of products including cars, medical equipment and mobile dev

  • Pakistan army chief wants negotiated end to rally

    Updated: 22 hr ago

    ISLAMABAD (AP) — Pakistan's powerful army chief called Wednesday for the country's civilian government to negotiate with thousands of protesters surrounding parliament who demand the prime minister step down over alleged fraud in last year's election. Gen. Rasheel Sharif made the request during a meeting with Shahbaz Sharif, the younger brother of Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif, Pakistani officials said. The premier earlier ended up sneaking into parliament through a back exit after the protesters torn down barricades late Tuesday and entered the so-called "Red Zone" housing key government buildings and diplomatic posts.

  • Israel's prime minister: 'We will not stop' Gaza operation until quiet is restored

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    JERUSALEM (AP) — Israel's prime minister: 'We will not stop' Gaza operation until quiet is restored.

  • US names Hondurans to drug kingpin list

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    TEGUCIGALPA, Honduras (AP) — The U.S. Treasury Department has imposed financial sanctions on three Honduran men, three coffee companies and a cattle and dairy operation under the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act. The men allegedly lead the Los Valles drug gang, which allegedly traffics tons of cocaine per month to the United States. A sister of the three men was arrested in the U.S. on federal drug charges in July. Honduran authorities seized more than 40 properties belonging to the Los Valles gang on Sunday. The department says Miguel Arnulfo Valle Valle, Luis Alonso Valle Valle and Jose Reynerio Valle Valle operate "as a close-knit family business.

  • Militants use British killer as propaganda

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    LONDON (AP) — Islamic militants are using a beheading video to send a chilling message — not just through the gruesome act, but also by the choice of messenger. The black-clad fighter who appears to kill journalist James Foley speaks with an English accent, underscoring the insurgents' increasing use of Western militants to mobilize recruits, terrify opponents and project the image of a global force. He is the latest in a string of international jihadis — Britons, Australians, Chechens, Chinese and Indonesians — to appear in propaganda for the Islamic State group. "They like to suggest they have a presence around the world much stronger than it is," said Charlie Cooper, a researcher at the Quilliam Foundation, a

  • Afghanistan orders NYT reporter to leave country

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Afghanistan ordered a New York Times correspondent Wednesday to leave the country in 24 hours and barred him from returning over a story he wrote saying that a group of officials were considering seizing power because of the impasse over who won its recent presidential election, the attorney general's office said in a statement. The attorney general's office called Matthew Rosenberg, 40, into their office Tuesday and asked him to reveal his sources, which he refused to do, the Times reported. On Wednesday, the attorney general's office said the story threatened Afghanistan's stability and security, announcing that he was being expelled. The statement suggested that the reporting, which relied largely on

  • AP PHOTOS: Peruvian nurse cares for 175 sick cats

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    LIMA, Peru (AP) — At her job, Maria Torero cares for sick human beings. At home, she lavishes love on slowly dying cats — 175 of them at last count. The 45-year-old nurse has turned her two-story, eight-room apartment into a hospice for cats with feline leukemia, scattering it with scores of feeding dishes and at least two dozen boxes litter boxes. Some have suggested she shelter healthy cats instead. "That's not my role," she told The Associated Press. "I'm a nurse. My duty is to the cats that nobody cares about." She said that "people don't adopt adult cats, especially if they are terminally ill." For five years, Torero has ministered to animals as they slowly succumb to the common, fatal retrovirus, which i

  • Neanderthals and humans had 'ample time' to mix

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    BERLIN (AP) — Humans and Neanderthals may have coexisted in Europe for more than 5,000 years, providing ample time for the two species to meet and mix, according to new research. Using new carbon dating techniques and mathematical models, researchers examined about 200 samples found at 40 sites from Spain to Russia, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature. They concluded with a high probability that pockets of Neanderthal culture survived until between 41,030 and 39,260 years ago. Although this puts the disappearance of Neanderthals earlier than some scientists previously thought, the findings support the idea that they lived alongside humans, who arrived in Europe about 45,000-43,000 years ago.

  • Militants attack major air base in eastern Syria

    Yesterday

    BEIRUT (AP) — Islamic extremists fired rockets and tank shells Wednesday at a major air base in northeastern Syria, kicking off a long-anticipated offensive to seize the last position held by the Syrian government in a province that is a stronghold of the Islamic State group, activists said. The attack on the Tabqa air base had been expected for weeks. Islamic State fighters have tightened their siege of the sprawling facility in recent days, capturing a string of nearby villages. The group in recent months has virtually eliminated the presence of President Bashar Assad's military in Raqqa province, with the exception of Tabqa.