• Explosive device injures 6 teens at California house party

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    MANTECA, Calif. (AP) — Authorities said six teenagers were injured after someone tossed an explosive device into a backyard party in the Northern California city of Manteca. Police officials said about 60 high-school aged teens were at the party Friday night when someone threw explosive device, possibly a modified firework, over a fence and into the backyard. The explosion injured six juveniles, and five of them remain hospitalized Saturday. A police statement said two of the victims suffered serious injuries and one was airlifted to a hospital in the San Francisco Bay area to be treated for an eye injury. Investigators are seeking the public's help to identify the suspect.

  • Magnitude 4.2 earthquake hits Oregon, no damage reported

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    SPRINGFIELD, Ore. (AP) — Some Oregonians woke on the Fourth of July to a significant jolt when a magnitude 4.2 earthquake struck near Springfield and Eugene. Hundreds of people reported to the U.S. Geological Survey that they felt the quake, which struck at 8:42 a.m. Saturday. Usually, there isn't any damage from quakes lower than magnitude 5.5, USGS geophysicist Paul Caruso said. City of Springfield officials said they haven't received any reports of damage from residents or to infrastructure. The Lane County Sheriff's Office also said it had conducted well-checks on local businesses and no major damages or injuries were reported.

  • 3 dead bodies found in 2 houses in coastal Maine town

    Updated: 23 hr ago

    BOOTHBAY HARBOR, Maine (AP) — Police have found three bodies inside two houses in the coastal Maine town of Boothbay Harbor, and authorities believe they are from the same family. A spokesman for the Maine Department of Public Safety says the victims are a man and woman in their 70s and a man in his 40s. Steve McCausland says no other people are believed to have been involved, but he did not provide more information about the victims or the circumstances of their deaths. He says two bodies were found Saturday inside a home on Lakeside Drive and later a third was found inside a home on Montgomery Road. Police say the discovery was made after someone called police requesting that they check on one of the propertie

  • Slain woman's parents focused on healing, not sanctuary law

    Yesterday

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — The parents of a woman killed at a San Francisco pier say they are focused on healing and not on the fact that the man accused of shooting her has been deported five times. Kathryn Steinle's father, Jim Steinle, told reporters he hopes justice reigns in the case against Francisco Sanchez, 45. "We're not dwelling on that," he said Friday, referring to the fact that Sanchez could have been deported months ago. "That's not going to bring Kate back." Kathryn Steinle was shot Wednesday evening as she walked with her father and a family friend at Pier 14, one of the busiest attractions in the city. Police arrested Sanchez about an hour after the seemingly random slaying of the 32-year-old San Fran

  • Gay rights activists mark landmark 1965 demonstration

    Yesterday

    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — Gay rights activists have gathered in front of Independence Hall in Philadelphia on the Fourth of July to mark the progress of their movement and pay tribute to those who launched it a half-century ago. But they also made it clear that the fight for equality was far from over. LGBT activist Aisha Moodie-Mills hailed the recent U.S. Supreme Court decision legalizing same-sex marriages nationwide, but said in many places "you can still get married on Sunday and then fired on Monday." Organizers have also been remembering some of the earliest gay rights marches, including a gathering of about 40 protesters in the same location on July 5, 1965 calling for equality.

  • Teen spits cherry pit the longest but doesn't win contest

    Yesterday

    EAU CLAIRE, Mich. (AP) — A 15-year-old Michigan girl said there was nothing special about the way she spit a cherry pit Saturday. "I just took a deep breath and pushed hard," said Megan Ankrapp of Buchanan, whose pit landed at 49 feet, ¼ inch — longest of the day at the 42nd annual contest in southwestern Michigan. "I was shocked," she said. Megan won the women's category but didn't participate in the overall championship round because her earlier spits were too short to qualify. The championship spit-off was claimed by Kevin Bartz of Niles with a winning distance of 48 feet, 8 inches. He was followed by 2014 champ Brian Krause at 48 feet. "Here I was all excited to finally beat the Krause family and I

  • Diana Douglas, 1st wife of Kirk Douglas, dies at 92

    Yesterday

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Diana Douglas, the first wife of Kirk Douglas and mother of Michael Douglas, has died in Los Angeles. She was 92. Michael Douglas's production company says she died of cancer on Saturday at a movie industry retirement home in Woodland Hills. Born in Bermuda, Douglas was an actress and model who appeared in dozens of movies and TV episodes. As a model, she was on the cover of Life magazine in May 1943. Kirk Douglas, an acquaintance from acting school, saw the cover and vowed to marry her. They tied the knot that year and had two sons, Michael and Joel, before divorcing in 1951. They remained on amicable terms and appeared together in several later films, including her last movie, 2003's "

  • Funeral for Mormon leader Boyd K. Packer slated for Friday

    Yesterday

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Funeral services for Mormon leader Boyd K. Packer, president of the faith's highest governing body, will be held next week. Church officials say services are scheduled for Friday at the Tabernacle on Temple Square in Salt Lake City. The 11 a.m. service will be open to the public ages 8 and older. A private burial will follow at the Brigham City Cemetery. Packer died July 3 at his Salt Lake City home of natural causes. He was 90. Packer was next in line to become president of the Salt Lake City-based Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. He had been a member of the church's Quorum of the Twelve Apostles since 1970. He was known as a staunch advocate for a conservative form of Mo

  • GB Packers tight end Quarless charged with firing a gun

    Yesterday

    MIAMI BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Green Bay Packers tight end Andrew Quarless was arrested Saturday after police said he allegedly fired two shots into the air during an argument outside a Miami Beach parking garage, authorities said. Miami Beach Police say a witness reported that Quarless was riding in a black Porsche with three other people around 5 a.m. Saturday when they pulled up to a car full of women. An arrest affidavit says the football player and another man approached the car. It said the conversation eventually escalated and the witness told authorities he heard the women yelling for Quarless and his friend to leave them alone. That's when authorities say Quarless, who is entering his sixth season with the Packers, pulle

  • Immigrant children given adult dose of hepatitis A vaccine

    Yesterday

    SAN ANTONIO (AP) — About 250 immigrant children were given an adult dose of a hepatitis A vaccine at a Texas detention facility where they were being held with their mothers, according to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials. The vaccines were administered this week, but none of the children has been hospitalized or had any adverse reactions, ICE officials said Saturday ICE spokesman Richard Rocha said health care professionals will monitor the children over the next five days for any potential side effects, though none are expected. "Parents at the facility were advised and counseled by medical professionals about potential side effects, with services made available in multiple languages," Rocha said in

  • Gov. Walker and Wisconsin GOP retreat on open records limits

    Yesterday

    MADISON, Wis. (AP) — In a sudden reversal amid a stinging backlash, Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker and GOP legislative leaders said they agreed Saturday to completely remove a part of the proposed state budget that would severely roll back open records laws. Walker announced the decision in a joint statement Saturday with Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald, Assembly Speaker Robin Vos, and the co-chairs of the joint budget committee. They said that they're committed to open and accountable government. "After substantive discussion over the last day, we have agreed that the provisions relating to any changes in the state's open records law will be removed from the budget in its entirety," the statement said. "...

  • Friends trying to hand off rice cooker cause scare at casino

    Yesterday

    LINCOLN, R.I. (AP) — Police say two friends trying to hand off a rice cooker at a Rhode Island casino caused a brief security scare. The Twin River Casino in Lincoln wasn't evacuated but the parking lot was temporarily closed Saturday morning until police determined there was no threat. WPRI-TV reports (http://bit.ly/1IXxH8P) a man told casino security he saw the cooker next to a car in the parking lot at about 9:40 a.m. Casino security, officers with the Lincoln and state police, and the state fire marshal's office responded. Police reviewed surveillance video and located the woman who left the cooker. She said she was meeting a friend who wanted to borrow it.

  • Matt Stonie tops Joey Chestnut in hot dog eating contest

    Yesterday

    NEW YORK (AP) — Matt Stonie shocked the competitive eating world Saturday by upsetting Joey "Jaws" Chestnut at the Fourth of July hot dog eating contest at Nathan's Famous in Coney Island, thwarting Chestnut's bid for a ninth straight victory. Stonie, 23, who finished second last year, downed 62 hot dogs and buns, beating Chestnut by two. Both are from San Jose, California. As thousands of spectators observed the eaters on an elevated stage, the next closest competitor ate 35 hot dogs. "I trained hard for this. This is actually amazing," Stonie told ESPN, which broadcast the competition live like the major sporting event its biggest fans say it has become.

  • Virginia chief says armed suspect killed during police chase

    Yesterday

    NEWPORT NEWS, Va. (AP) — Police in Newport News, Virginia, say a 23-year-old man was fatally shot by police after he ignored their pleas to put down a sawed-off shotgun. Police Chief Richard Myers said Kawanza Jamal Beaty was shot early Saturday in the ship-building city. He says the three officers involved in the fatal chase were put on paid administrative leave while separate investigations are conducted. While Myers said his department has been a leader in equipping its force with body cameras, none of the officers involved in the chase was wearing one. Myers said someone nearby had heard the police warning "Drop the weapon! Drop the weapon!" but had not witnessed the deadly encounter.

  • 66 riders safely evacuated after 400-foot Ferris wheel stops

    Yesterday

    ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — The largest Ferris wheel on the East Coast reopened Saturday, one day after 66 riders were stranded on The Orlando Eye and had to be evacuated from the towering 400-foot attraction. "The team of technicians has successfully completed the necessary work to resolve the technical default that occurred yesterday within the system that monitors the wheel's position," spokeswoman Dipika Joshi told the Orlando Sentinel (http://bit.ly/1f9nChM). No one was hurt in the Friday afternoon stoppage and all were taken off in an operation lasting about three hours with help from firefighters.

  • Utility drones could inspect equipment, scan for outages

    Yesterday

    LITHONIA, Ga. (AP) — When tornadoes and hurricanes topple power lines in the future, flying drones might be the first to pinpoint the damage. Power companies across the United States are testing whether small drones can spot trouble on transmission lines or inspect equipment deep inside hard-to-reach power plant boilers. That's just for starters. Researchers and industry executives predict the drones could provide security surveillance to deter vandalism on remote gear and make it safer for utility workers to climb poles and towers. One of the country's largest power companies, Southern Co., says it hopes drones can eventually identify storm damage in the Southeast and allow it to increase its routine inspections.

  • A year on, children caught on border struggle to stay, adapt

    Yesterday

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — At 1-year-old, a wide-eyed, restless Joshua Tinoco faces the prospect of deportation to his native Honduras, one of tens of thousands of children who arrived at the U.S.-Mexico border last year. While his teenage mother has been allowed to stay in the U.S. and seek a green card under a federal program for abused, abandoned and neglected children, Joshua has been classified as an enforcement priority by immigration prosecutors, his lawyer said. "I fought so much for him to be here with me and now they yank him from my hands," said Dunia Bueso, the boy's now-18-year-old mother.

  • McCain: US must reassess Afghanistan troop withdrawal

    Yesterday

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The ongoing Taliban offensive in Afghanistan demands a reassessment of the Obama administration's current plan to drawdown U.S. forces, U.S. Sen. John McCain said Saturday during a visit to the country's capital. The Republican told reporters that Afghan national forces are fighting bravely, but suffering heavy losses in the field. American and international troops have already stopped playing a combat role, remaining as trainers for local forces. The international numbers will be reduced further at the end of 2016. But McCain said reductions should be based on conditions on the ground.

  • Maine using online tool to try to stamp out invasive plants

    Yesterday

    YARMOUTH, Maine (AP) — Maine is turning to crowdsourcing to chronicle the invasive plants that plague some of its natural areas. The state is gathering the data through its iMapInvasive website, which launched a year ago. The online tool allows residents to send photos of invasive plants they encounter on public or private land. Some 224 users have submitted more than 2,800 observations of about 40 non-native plant species through the tool, said state invasive plant biologist Nancy Olmstead. The state is using the data to improve the way it manages public lands and to inform private landowners of how they can stamp out invasive species, she said. "The problem with these plants is that they overrun native habitats and

  • Tunisia imposes state of emergency after deadly beach attack

    Yesterday

    TUNIS, Tunisia (AP) — Tunisia's president declared a state of emergency on Saturday in response to a second deadly attack on foreigners in three months, saying the country is "not safe" and risks collapse from further extremist attacks. With a nationwide televised address, President Beji Caid Essebsi officially reintroduced urgent security measures for Tunisia that had been lifted in March 2014. Essebsi said an "exceptional situation required exceptional measures" but pledged to respect freedom of expression. The decision came just over a week after a gunman at the popular beach resort of Sousse attacked foreign tourists, killing 38 people. Essebsi said the state of emergency would last 30 days.




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