• Michelle Obama, Jill Biden visit Maryland veterans center

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    SILVER SPRING, Md. (AP) — Wayne Miller was 18 when he lost his leg and became temporarily paralyzed after being hit by a mortar round during the Vietnam War. He told his friends he'd been in a motorcycle accident. "It was a tough time," said Miller, who had to readjust his social life while being cared for by his parents. Now 64 and walking with only a slight limp from his metal left leg, Miller is a social worker and the team leader of the Silver Spring Vet Center. On Friday, Miller served as guide during a visit by Michelle Obama and Jill Biden, who toured the therapeutic services center as part of their Joining Forces initiative, which highlights the need to provide resources and support for military members

  • Correction: Bird Flu story

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — In a story April 16 about bird flu, The Associated Press reported erroneously that recent outbreaks had led to the death of more than 2.5 million turkeys and chickens. The correct figure at the time was more than 2.4 million, and not all the birds slated to be euthanized had been. A corrected version of the story is below: USDA veterinarian: Bird flu outbreak could be 'devastating' Top USDA veterinarian: Bird flu outbreak may last for years and be 'devastating' to poultry By STEVE KARNOWSKI Associated Press ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) — The nation's poultry industry may have to live with a deadly bird flu strain for several years, which would be "devastating," the U.S.

  • Chicago schools chief to take temporary leave amid probe

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    CHICAGO (AP) — Chicago Public Schools CEO Barbara Byrd-Bennett will take a paid leave of absence amid a federal investigation over a roughly $20 million no-bid contract the district awarded to a training academy where she once worked as a consultant, officials announced Friday. The schools chief of the nation's third-largest district — chosen by Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel in 2012 — requested the leave effective Monday, which the Chicago Board of Education agreed to. "In light of the attention given to my position as chief executive officer of the Chicago Public Schools, I believe that my continuing as CEO at this time would be a distraction," Byrd-Bennett wrote in a letter to board members Friday.

  • Police pledge thorough probe of death after stun gun shock

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    HAGERSTOWN, Md. (AP) — Police in Maryland promised a thorough investigation Friday into the death of a man in custody after police shocked him with a stun gun outside a home he had allegedly broken into. Darrell Lawrence Brown, 31, died early Friday morning after at least one officer shocked him. Brown had ignored police commands to get down on the ground and instead became aggressive, according to police and eyewitnesses. Several people who watched the encounter late Thursday night said officers didn't punch or kick Brown before or after he was shocked and handcuffed. "They were pretty much doing their job," said neighbor Robert Holmes, who added that from what he saw, the police did not get physical with Brown.

  • Hunter-Reay disagrees with penalty over role in 3-car wreck

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    LONG BEACH, Calif. (AP) — Ryan Hunter-Reay vehemently disagreed with the penalty IndyCar levied against him for a three-car accident at New Orleans. The series docked the Indianapolis 500 winner three points and placed him on probation for three races for what IndyCar called "avoidable contact" in last Sunday's race. "I think it's BS and I told them that," Hunter-Reay told The Indianapolis Star on Friday at Long Beach. "I've had a lot of guys come to me, a lot of drivers come to me, a lot of ex-drivers come to me, and tell me the same thing ... they all disagree with the call." Simon Pagenaud ran off course as he raced three-wide with Hunter-Reay and Sebastien Bourdais following a late restart.

  • 24 new HIV cases reported in Indiana outbreak, 130 total

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — An Indiana county at the heart of an HIV outbreak has seen a "significant increase" in the number of cases more than two weeks into a short-term needle exchange program approved by Gov. Mike Pence, state health officials said Friday. The Indiana State Department of Health said there are now 120 confirmed HIV cases and 10 preliminary positive cases tied to Scott County, about 30 miles north of Louisville, Kentucky. That's up from 106 last week. Health officials who declared an epidemic last month have said they expect the number of cases to rise as more people are tested. But the growing number could put pressure on Pence to extend the 30-day needle exchange program that he approved March 26.

  • Why banks made more money last quarter

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Wall Street and Main Street gave banks a boost last quarter. Fees from corporate mergers and commissions from trading fueled profits at big financial firms. But average Americans also helped by taking out more home loans and paying off their debts. Here's a look at what drove the first-quarter results: HOME LOAN JUMP: Ultra-low interest rates led to a surge of refinancing and new home loans in the first quarter. JPMorgan Chase created $24.7 billion worth of mortgages, up 45 percent from a year earlier, while Bank of America put together mortgages worth $13.7 billion, up 54 percent. Wells Fargo, the nation's largest mortgage lender, generated $49 billion in home loans, up 36 percent from the same period

  • Iran urges UN to try to end Saudi-led bombing in Yemen

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    UNITED NATIONS (AP) — Iran's foreign minister urged U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon on Friday to try to end "the senseless aerial attacks" in Yemen by a Saudi-led coalition and establish a cease-fire. Javad Zarif said in a letter, obtained by The Associated Press, that airstrikes by the regional coalition of Sunni Muslim countries are destroying hospitals, schools, roads, food factories and power plants, and have targeted residential areas including refugee camps, killing and injuring innocent civilians. "This critical situation is escalating and the humanitarian crisis in Yemen is approaching catastrophic dimensions," he said.

  • Nashville teen accused of making multiple threats to schools

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — A Nashville teen has been arrested after allegedly sending emails filled with graphic threats to blow up schools and massacre teachers and students, authorities said. An FBI affidavit records threats sent to 12 schools in Nashville; Pittsburgh; Brockton and Whitman, Massachusetts; and Burke, Virginia beginning March 16. Some schools were threatened more than once, and the threats became progressively longer, more specific and more gruesome. An email sent early Thursday to Nashville's Antioch High School threatened a "columbine or sandy hook like shooting" and made graphically violent threats against a specific teacher. Police closed the school at 9:45 a.m. Thursday and wouldn't clear it to open

  • 2 years after marathon bombing, state renews offer of aid

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    BOSTON (AP) — Massachusetts is renewing its push to aid those injured and traumatized by the Boston Marathon bombing, the state's attorney general said Friday. The state's Office of Victim Assistance is continuing to offer survivors of the attack access to experts on mental health, rehabilitation and hearing loss, Attorney General Maura Healey said. Ongoing trauma can manifest in a number of ways, from trouble sleeping and feelings of isolation to an inability to focus and being easily startled by loud noises, said Liam Lowney, executive director of the victim assistance office. "These are all normal reactions to violence," he said. He urged those who have experienced the symptoms after the attacks — or other

  • Slow start to elver season means high price for baby eels

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    PORTLAND, Maine (AP) — Maine's baby eel season is off to a slow start, causing prices to balloon back to historic levels as fishermen wait for waterways to finish thawing. Elvers, also called glass eels, are sold overseas as seed stock for Asian aquaculture companies that raise them to maturity and sell them as food. Maine fishermen are by far the largest supplier of elvers in the U.S. Some end up back in America in restaurants as sushi. The fishery for the baby eels is one of the most valuable in Maine, even though value dropped in 2014. Fishermen caught 9,690 pounds of elvers last year at an average price of $874.52 per pound, according to state data.

  • Barbie shows signs of life as Mattel plots comeback

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Things are finally looking up for Barbie. Mattel, the toy company behind the plastic dolls, said there were some signs of improving demand for Barbie ahead of its planned makeover of the brand, including Barbie dolls with different skin tones, eye colors and nose shapes to better relate to multicultural girls and their mothers. The El Segundo, California, company also reported better-than expected financial results for the first quarter and its shares rose more than 5 percent on Friday. Mattel said late Thursday that more people were buying Barbie dolls in U.S. stores. BMO Capital Markets analyst Gerrick Johnson said the rise was a "positive" development, in a note to clients.

  • Patient suspected of selling meth from hospital bed

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    VANCOUVER, Wash. (AP) — Authorities say a woman is suspected of dealing drugs from her Vancouver, Washington, hospital bed. Sgt. David Chaney of the Camas Police Department says detectives learned that 47-year-old Karin Cole was dealing methamphetamine out of her room at PeaceHealth Southwest Medical Center. A Clark County judge approved a search warrant, and Chaney says detectives on Thursday seized 6 ½ grams of meth, a digital scale and drug packaging materials. Chaney says Cole wasn't arrested at the time of the search warrant because of medical concerns. He says the case is being referred to a prosecutor with the request she be charged with methamphetamine possession with intent to deliver.

  • 12 hurt in Denver-area crash involving tour buses amid fog

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    DENVER (AP) — A dozen people were injured in a crash involving tour buses for two different bands and two trucks on a foggy stretch of Interstate 70 east of Denver on Friday, as a spring storm made driving dangerous across Colorado and Wyoming. A bus carrying crew members for the Brooklyn-based performer Twin Shadow rear-ended a semi-trailer stopped on the highway, seriously injuring 41-year-old bus driver John Crawford, the Colorado State Patrol said. Eleven other people on that bus suffered minor to moderate injuries. The Twin Shadow bus then hit another truck and a tour bus carrying crew members of the country band Thompson Square. No one in those vehicles was injured. Both bands were headed to Denver for shows Fr

  • Greek 'day of reckoning' shakes stock markets

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Fear that Greece could default on its debt and abandon the euro rattled global financial markets Friday. News that negotiations between Greece and its international lenders are making little progress sent European stock markets down sharply, and the selling spread across the Atlantic. By the close of U.S. trading, stocks across industries were lower, with four of five stocks down. Investors shifted money into German government bonds, a perceived haven in troubled times. In the U.S., disappointing first-quarter financial results from several big companies fed the selling. After American Express reported revenue that fell short of expectations, investors drove down its stock more than 4 percent.

  • No. 1 egg-producing state aims to keep bird flu out

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — The discovery of bird flu on an Iowa turkey farm has raised serious concerns that the poultry-killing virus could find its way into chicken barns in the nation's top egg-producing state and decimate flocks. Iowa is home to roughly 50 million chickens that lay nearly one in every five eggs consumed in the U.S. The highly contagious H5N2 virus has not been detected in any Iowa chicken barns, but it was confirmed Tuesday on a northwest Iowa turkey farm. Iowa Poultry Association executive Randy Olson says farmers are on heightened alert, focusing on biosecurity measures to keep the virus away from chickens.

  • Jury in case of missing boy Etan Patz asks to view evidence

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — A New York jury deliberating in the murder trial of a man accused of kidnapping and killing 6-year-old Etan Patz (AY'-tahn payts) in 1979 has asked to review a confession and other evidence. Pedro Hernandez says he choked Etan in a convenience store basement after luring him there with the promise of a soda. Etan disappeared May 25, 1979. His body was never found. Jurors asked Friday to see a missing-person poster shown to Hernandez at a police station before he confessed. They also requested his videotaped confession and some witness statements. The jury went home for the weekend without reaching a verdict. Deliberations are to resume Monday. Hernandez's lawyer says the confession was imaginary

  • BC-BOX--Mayweather-Pacquiao,ADVISORY

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    Editors, A look at the stories the Associated Press is planning in the weeks before the megafight between Floyd Mayweather and Manny Pacquiao, and a coverage plan for the May 2 match. This advisory will be updated as more content is added. This update adds the publication of BOX-MAYWEATHER-PACQUIAO TICKETS. If you have any questions please contact AP Sports at 212-621-1630. Friday, April 17 BOX--MAYWEATHER-PACQUIAO TICKETS LAS VEGAS — Don't expect to snag a $1,500 nosebleed ticket — or any other ticket — at the box office for the fight between Floyd Mayweather Jr. and Manny Pacquiao. SENT: 800 words.

  • UW-Madison says 400 jobs to be cut under Walker budget

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    MADISON, Wis. (AP) — The University of Wisconsin's flagship campus in Madison would have to eliminate about 400 mostly vacant positions, close and merge programs and reduce academic offerings and services if Gov. Scott Walker's proposed budget cut passes, Chancellor Rebecca Blank said Friday. Blank posted a plan on her school Web page for how UW-Madison would cope with Walker's proposed cuts, noting that even though the final amount isn't known, the school had to consider how to deal with what could be a $96 million budget hole next year. "This is a hard thing for morale," said Kathryn VandenBosch, dean of the UW-Madison College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. "It's a hard thing when you're trying to recruit new faculty

  • Colorado law enforcement switches message to safe pot use

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    DENVER (AP) — Breaking from decades of "Just Say No"-type messaging about marijuana use, Colorado law enforcement officials are starting a new campaign designed to promote safe marijuana use. The revised campaign starts this weekend, when tens of thousands are expected at public rallies and concerts in observation of the 4/20 marijuana holiday. A few things to know about the new effort, along with some backstory: ___ GOING TO THE SOURCE The Colorado Department of Transportation is taking its campaign to the demographic most likely to use pot and then drive, according to surveys. That's men aged 21 to 34. The agency will be at cannabis festivals, concerts and celebrations this weekend.




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