• Nike co-founder Knight will step down as chairman

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Nike Chairman Phil Knight, who turned a business selling shoes out of the back of his car into the world's most valuable sports brand, has announced plans to step down as company chairman. Knight, 77, was a middle distance runner in college who began the company in a handshake deal with Oregon coach Bob Bowerman in 1964, with each putting up $500. With shrewd marketing campaigns built around celebrity endorsers like Michael Jordan and Tiger Woods, he made the swoosh one of the most recognizable logos around the globe. That phenomenal growth also landed Knight on Forbes magazine's list of 50 richest people in the world, with a net worth estimated at $24 billion.

  • Hawaii OKs traditional burials involving burned corpses

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    HONOLULU (AP) — The governor of Hawaii signed a bill on Tuesday ensuring that Native Hawaiians can practice an ancient tradition in which a corpse is cleansed by fire and the bones are held as sacred in a natural cloth before being buried or interred. Gov. David Ige approved the bill amid concerns by some crematories that the rarely used practice might be illegal. In Hawaii, a person can be accused of abusing a corpse — a misdemeanor — if human remains are handled in a way that "would outrage ordinary family sensibilities," according to state law. Now, Hawaiian leaders plan to meet with funeral industry representatives to explore how families can handle the remains of their loved ones in a traditional way.

  • Legendary bluesman Robert Johnson's son dies in Mississippi

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A son of legendary Mississippi blues artist Robert Johnson became rich by winning a court fight over his father's estate. But even when finances were no longer a concern, an attorney said Claud Johnson kept the gravel truck he had driven for years — a reminder of the hard work that guided his own life. Claud Johnson was 83 when he died Tuesday, said John Kitchens, who represented him in the extended legal battle over the estate of Robert Johnson. The Mississippi Supreme Court ruled in early 2014 that Claud Johnson could keep the profits from the only two known photographs of his father. Legend has it that Robert Johnson, who wrote "Me and the Devil Blues" and "Crossroads Blues," sold his soul to the

  • Man accused in Boko Haram abduction of Chibok girls arrested

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    LAGOS, Nigeria (AP) — Nigerian troops have arrested a businessman accused of "participating actively" in Boko Haram's mass abduction of nearly 300 schoolgirls from the northeastern town of Chibok last year, Nigeria's Defense Ministry said Tuesday. Spokesman Maj. Gen. Chris Olukolade said Babuji Ya'ari headed a "terrorists' intelligence cell" for the Islamic extremists while masquerading as a member of the self-defense Youth Vigilante Group. That confirms suspicions that the vigilantes have been infiltrated by Boko Haram. Soldiers have told the AP that some of their comrades also belong to Nigeria's homegrown Islamic extremist group. "The arrest of the businessman ...

  • Girl Scouts refuse $100,000 anti-transgender donation

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    SEATTLE (AP) — The Girl Scouts of Western Washington said it has returned a $100,000 donation because it came with the provision that the money couldn't be used to support transgender girls. The group said it sent back the money in late May after the donor had asked that the gift be returned unless the group guaranteed it would not be used to benefit transgender girls. "Girl Scouts is for every girl, and that is every girl regardless of race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, sexual orientation, gender identity, religion. Every girl is every girl," Megan Ferland, CEO of the Girl Scouts of Western Washington, said in an interview Tuesday. "It was a sad decision, but it was not a difficult decision.

  • Trump says he's struck back at Univision with $500M lawsuit

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Donald Trump's lawyers say Trump and the Miss Universe pageant have sued Univision for $500 million in a New York court, claiming Trump's First Amendment rights were violated when the company declined to air the Miss USA contest. The lawsuit, filed in State Supreme Court in Manhattan on Tuesday, names Univision Networks & Studios Inc. and Alberto Ciurana, Univision's programming and content president. Univision says in a statement the lawsuit is "factually false and legally ridiculous." The lawsuit claims breach of contract, defamation and speech violations. It says Univision cut ties with Miss Universe because Univision's owner supports Democratic candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton.

  • What's next for California's contentious vaccine law

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Gov. Jerry Brown on Tuesday signed a hotly contested California bill to impose one of the strictest school vaccination laws in the country in the wake of an outbreak of measles at Disneyland late last year. The following is a look at what the new law means for the nation's most populous state: ___ WHAT PROMPTED THE BILL After a measles outbreak at Disneyland in December sickened over 100 people in the U.S. and Mexico, Democratic Sens. Richard Pan of Sacramento and Ben Allen of Santa Monica introduced the bill, designed to raise immunization rates in under-vaccinated pockets of the state.

  • Review: In Winehouse doc 'Amy,' celebrity is the villain

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    Asif Kapadia's Amy Winehouse documentary "Amy" is a slow, tragic zoom out. It begins with the intimacy of home movies and ends in far-away paparazzi footage. Our VIP access has been revoked. First seen as a bright-eyed 14-year-old girl singing a knockout "Happy Birthday," Winehouse gradually recedes from our view as her renown grows, obscured by a blizzard of flashes and a deadening haze of celebrity. Fame arrives like fate: a destiny foreshadowed by Winehouse's self-evident talent and her own ominous misgivings. "I would go mad," she says of fame before its tidal-wave arrival. "Amy" is an exceptional, emotional portrait of a pop star who perished too young.

  • Daytona offers American flags in exchange program

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    DAYTONA BEACH, Fla. (AP) — Daytona International Speedway will not ban the Confederate flag from track property this weekend, but will offer the American flag to those who wish to fly it on property. Daytona President Joie Chitwood said Tuesday the speedway will offer an exchange program in which fans can trade a flag for the American flag. Daytona hosts NASCAR races on Saturday and Sunday nights this weekend. "We are celebrating the American flag this weekend, it is our nation's birthday," Chitwood said. "We're going to have a flag exchange opportunity, so fans who would like to fly the American flag, we'll trade with you whatever flag you have, we want you to celebrate that flag this weekend. That's what is important.

  • Same-sex marriage fight turns to clerks who refuse licenses

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    MOREHEAD, Ky. (AP) — Rowan County Clerk Kim Davis shut her blinds at work Tuesday to block the view of rainbow-clad protesters outside. They carried flowers and flags and signs saying "you don't own marriage." They chanted "do your job." Moments later, she told a lesbian couple who walked in asking for a license to try another county. Davis is among a handful of public officials across the Bible Belt so repulsed by the thought of enabling a same-sex marriage that they are defying the U.S. Supreme Court and refusing to issue a license to anyone, gay or straight. "It's a deep-rooted conviction; my conscience won't allow me to do that," Davis told The Associated Press. "It goes against everything I hold dear, everything

  • Jennifer Garner, Ben Affleck say they're getting divorce

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — As regulars at a local farmer's market, Ben Affleck, Jennifer Garner and their three young children looked like the perfect Hollywood family. The stars took turns working so they could nurture their careers and their kids — devoted parents who appeared arm-in-arm at countless industry events. "It's work, but it's the best kind of work," Affleck famously said of his marriage to Garner when he accepted the best picture Oscar for "Argo." Now, it seems the work is done. After weeks of public speculation about their relationship, the couple announced Tuesday they plan to end their 10-year marriage with a divorce.

  • Family: Stranded woman rescued after giving birth in forest

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    OROVILLE, Calif. (AP) — Authorities rescued a woman and her newborn baby after her family says she gave birth in a remote national forest in Northern California. U.S. Forest Service spokesman Chris French said Tuesday that a helicopter pilot responding to a brush fire Saturday first spotted a mother and an infant. Rescue workers on the ground whisked the pair to safety and they were taken to a hospital, French said. French said the cause of the fire is under investigation. "I cannot confirm the day of birth beyond that she reported to us she had been there for three days," French said. "Also, her statement to us was that she gave birth at her vehicle within the forest. We did not witness the birth.

  • Embattled rebel flag reassessed at Georgia's Stone Mountain

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    ATLANTA (AP) — At Georgia's iconic Stone Mountain — where the Confederacy is enshrined in a giant bas-relief sculpture, the Ku Klux Klan once held notorious cross-burnings and large Confederate flags still wave prominently — officials are considering what to do about those flags. The park, which now offers family-friendly fireworks and laser light shows, is readying its "Fantastic Fourth Celebration" Thursday through Sunday, and multiple Confederate flag varieties are still displayed at the mountain's base. The display includes the "battle flag" of the Confederacy, said Bill Stephens, chief executive officer of the Stone Mountain Memorial Association.

  • Tulsa judge says grand jury can review sheriff's operations

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    TULSA, Okla. (AP) — A grand jury should review operations at an Oklahoma sheriff's office that sent onto the streets a 73-year-old reserve deputy who shot and killed an unarmed and restrained suspect, a judge ruled Tuesday. District Judge Rebecca Nightingale ordered a grand jury to convene on July 20 after denying a motion by attorneys for Tulsa County Sheriff Stanley Glanz to disqualify the petition because circulators didn't attach a 33-page summary of specific allegations against the sheriff to the signature pages. Glanz, who was attending the National Sheriffs' Association annual conference in Baltimore, said in a statement that he would explore his legal options when he returned to Tulsa.

  • Ted Cruz turns 'Simpsons' jobseeker; he'll take any part

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — Ted Cruz wants to be president, but he's got another job in mind as well: voice actor for "The Simpsons." In a tongue-in-cheek BuzzFeed video posted Tuesday, the Republican senator from Texas says he's auditioning to replace "The Simpsons" cast member Harry Shearer, who has said he's leaving Fox's animated TV show. "Hi, I'm Ted," Cruz says, adding that he'll take any part he can get. He then offers game versions of "Simpsons" characters including tough boss Mr. Burns, nerdy Ned Flanders, family patriarch Homer and even schoolgirl Lisa. It's a lighthearted change-of-pace for the conservative senator, whose tone is often stern and serious.

  • French soldiers accused of sexual abuse of minors in Africa

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    PARIS (AP) — Two French soldiers serving in the African country of Burkina Faso are being suspended over accusations of sexual abuse of minors, authorities said Tuesday. It is the second case of alleged sexual abuse of minors by French soldiers in Africa to surface in recent months. French officials insisted Tuesday that the Burkina Faso case was unrelated to the earlier one, in Central African Republic, involving different soldiers. French military spokesman Col. Gilles Jaron said the government found out Monday about the accusations against troops serving in the Burkina Faso capital of Ouagadougou, and on Tuesday informed French judicial authorities and began procedures to suspend them from military duties.

  • Grenade-shaped perfume bottle leads to courthouse evacuation

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    CINCINNATI (AP) — A suspicious item that prompted a Cincinnati courthouse evacuation turned out to be a perfume bottle shaped like a World War II grenade. Hamilton County Sheriff Jim Neil told reporters that the bottle was shaped like a "pineapple" hand grenade and was in a woman's suitcase. The building was evacuated around 8:30 a.m. Tuesday and then closed for the rest of the day after a suspicious item was noted in a security screening. Sheriff's official Jim Knapp said earlier that something "didn't look right" in the screening. A bomb-sniffing dog was brought over, and authorities evacuated the courthouse based on its response. Neil says that he isn't sure what prompted the dog's response. He says no charge

  • Shell secures new authorization in pursuing Arctic drilling

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    JUNEAU, Alaska (AP) — Royal Dutch Shell has secured another federal authorization as it pursues plans to drill exploration wells in the Arctic waters off the Alaska coast. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Tuesday issued a letter of authorization allowing for the possible harassment of polar bears and Pacific walrus incidental to Shell's drilling program work. Intentional harassment is not permitted. The authorization includes measures that Shell must take to minimize the effect of its work on the animals, including a minimum spacing of 15 miles between all drill rigs or seismic survey vessels, something conservation groups had sought. Nonetheless, some of those groups still called on President Barack Obama's administra

  • 3 indicted in brutal rape, killing of Baltimore teen

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    BALTIMORE (AP) — Three men have been indicted in the brutal sexual assault and slaying of a teenage girl whose body was discovered inside a Baltimore home that had been intentionally set on fire. Adonay Dixon, 23, John Childs, 20, and Raeshawn Rivers, 14, were indicted Tuesday on first-degree murder, first-degree rape, arson, kidnapping and other charges stemming from the death of 16-year-old Arnesha Bowers, a junior at Baltimore City College high school. If convicted, they could face life in prison. Police said the killing was part of a gang initiation. Bowers' body was discovered June 7 inside her grandmother's home, which investigators say was set fire in an attempt to conceal the crimes.

  • Judge nixes bridge lane-closing suit against Christie allies

    Updated: 3 hr ago

    NEWARK, N.J. (AP) — A federal judge has dismissed a class-action lawsuit filed by people who were stuck in traffic when lanes leading to the George Washington Bridge were closed without warning in 2013, but an attorney for the plaintiffs vowed Tuesday to file an amended complaint. The judge's ruling posted Monday faulted the plaintiffs for not describing what each defendant's role was in the scheme, but it gave the plaintiffs leeway to refile eight of the 11 claims contained in the complaint. Attorney Barry Epstein said the plaintiffs would do exactly that. The consolidated class-action complaint is a combination of two lawsuits filed in early 2014, several months after the lane closings at the bridge caused massive gridloc




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