• Pesticide OK'd for Washington oyster beds amid concerns

    Updated: 13 hr ago

    SEATTLE (AP) — For decades, oyster growers in southwest Washington have battled to control native shrimp that burrow in the mudflats and make it hard for oysters to grow. Now, after getting state approval, a group of shellfish farmers plan to spray a widely-used neurotoxic pesticide on up to 2,000 acres of commercial shellfish beds in Grays Harbor and Willapa Bay. They insist it's a safe way to keep in check a threat to the area's multi-million shellfish industry. But critics, including the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, worry about unintended harm to other species.

  • Frank Olivo, Santa pelted with snow at '68 Eagles game, dies

    Updated: 13 hr ago

    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — The fill-in Santa whose downfield jaunt at a Philadelphia Eagles game in 1968 lives on in sports history for the hail of snowballs and shower of boos that rained down on him has died. Frank Olivo was 66. Olivo died early Thursday at a suburban hospital after a long battle with heart disease, diabetes and other ailments, said his cousin, Richard Monastra. The story of Olivo's misfortune has long been held up as a symbol of Philly sports fans' ferocity, but far from minding his moment in sports history, Olivo "gloried in it," Monastra said. "It was his 15 minutes of fame," he said. "He kind of liked it, actually.

  • Lawmaker: Islamic State kills some 25 captive Iraqi Yazidis

    Updated: 13 hr ago

    BAGHDAD (AP) — A prominent Yazidi lawmaker in Iraq says Islamic State group militants have killed at least 25 captive Yazidis at a prison camp. Legislator Mahma Khalil said late Saturday that the militants killed the captives on Friday in the town of Tal Afar. Khalil said he spoke to four different people with knowledge of the situation in the camp. Khalil says the reason behind the killings was still unknown. He said: "The militants want to spread horror among them to force them to convert to Islam or to do something else." He added that the killed captives included men, women and elderly who were kept in a camp south of Tal Afar. He believes some 1,400 other Yazidis are still held in that camp.

  • Maldives court orders opposition leaders detained

    Updated: 14 hr ago

    MALE, Maldives (AP) — A court in the Maldives on Saturday ordered three opposition leaders and 172 of their supporters detained further after they were arrested for violence during a protest demanding the president to resign and freedom for a jailed ex-president. With the court order the entire opposition leadership behind Friday's anti-government protests is detained. Police announced they arrested nearly 200 people including the leaders and 187 of them were brought to court Saturday night. The remaining had been released by police themselves. The court ordered that the three opposition leaders and 171 other protesters be detained for 15 days. One other protester was ordered to be detained for seven days.

  • Rebels attack town in north Mali; thousands march for peace

    Updated: 14 hr ago

    BAMAKO, Mali (AP) — Thousands of people marched in Mali's capital calling for peace in the north, as a resident in the town of Dire reported an attack by Tuareg rebels. Souleymane Amadou, a teacher, said Saturday that fighters from the Coordination of Azawad Movements, a coalition of autonomy minded groups including ethnic Arabs and Tuaregs, surprised residents and Malian soldiers there. Dire is 135 kilometers (84 miles) west of Timbuktu. An official with the U.N. peacekeeping mission in Mali confirmed the attack, speaking on condition of anonymity because he didn't have permission to speak to the press. The violence that resurged this week has killed at least 19 people and threatens a peace accord meant to be signed

  • Burundi military says it will remain neutral amid protests

    Updated: 14 hr ago

    BUJUMBURA, Burundi (AP) — Burundi's defense minister said Saturday the army will remain neutral amid the street protests stemming from the president's controversial bid for a third term. Maj. Gen. Pontien Gaciyubwenge told a news conference that "all political actors" in Burundi should not go down the path of violence, according to local media. In street protests since Sunday, the military has been acting as a buffer between protesters and local police, who are accused of sometimes using live ammunition against the protesters. Tear gas has also been used to break up crowds.

  • Afghan trial in mob killing that sparked outrage begins

    Updated: 14 hr ago

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The trial of 49 suspects, including 19 police officers, on charges relating to the brutal mob killing of an Afghan woman began Saturday in Kabul. The opening of the trial at Afghanistan's Primary Court was broadcast live on nationwide television. The suspects all face charges relating to the March 19 killing of a 27-year-old woman named Farkhunda. A prosecutor read charges against 10 of the defendants, including assault, murder and encouraging others to participate in the assault. The police officers are charged with neglecting their duties and failing to prevent the attack. Prosecutors have alleged that Farkhunda was beaten to death in a frenzied attack sparked by a bogus accusation that she

  • Pro-Kurdish Turkish leaders campaign in Europe for June vote

    Updated: 14 hr ago

    PARIS (AP) — A pro-Kurdish Turkish political leader says he's confident that his party can achieve the 10 percent threshold needed to put lawmakers into parliament in Turkey's June 7 election. But he and others are campaigning across Europe to ensure a victory. Selahattin Demirtas, co-leader of the Kurdish Peoples' Democratic Party, or HDP, drew thousands of backers Saturday to a Paris rally. Other party leaders went to Austria and Germany. Demirtas told The Associated Press that "we will reach the 10 percent threshold. There is no risk." He said his party's priority would be a new constitution with "ethnic, religious and gender rights." Party members previously ran as independents.

  • Giant billowing aerial sculpture being installed in Boston

    Updated: 14 hr ago

    BOSTON (AP) — Is it a bird? Is it a plane? No, it's a giant aerial sculpture. Workers will install a 600-foot colorful floating work by artist Janet Echelman high above the Rose Kennedy Greenway in Boston's Financial District on Sunday. The shimmering 1-ton fiber sculpture is designed to respond fluidly to the wind and weather. It will remain suspended between high-rise buildings through October. Organizers say it will take four dozen workers up to 20 hours and a battery of cranes and scissor lifts to install the billowy piece. Echelman is based in suburban Brookline. Her sculpture — which includes more than 100 miles of twine — is inspired by ancient fishing nets.

  • Canadian prime minister visits Iraq as bombings kill 30

    Updated: 14 hr ago

    BAGHDAD (AP) — Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper made a surprise visit Saturday to Iraq, pledging to continue Canada's support for the battle against the Islamic State group as bombings across the country killed at least 30 people. The Canadian government has announced $139 million in additional aid to address the refugee crisis around the region precipitated by the fighting, in addition to the $67 million already committed to Iraq. Iraq's Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi received Harper in Baghdad. Canada is part of the U.S.-led international coalition supporting the Iraqi military with airstrikes, training and weapons. Harper pledged to continue his government's support for Iraq.

  • US decides not to investigate Toyota unwanted acceleration

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    DETROIT (AP) — U.S. safety regulators have rejected a Rhode Island man's request for an investigation into low-speed unintended acceleration problems with Toyota Corolla compact cars. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration says it put over 2,000 miles on the man's 2010 Corolla. But the agency's Ohio test lab couldn't find any problems with the throttle or transmission. The lab also found that the brakes could keep the car stationary at full throttle. The decision is a victory for Toyota, which has been dogged by complaints of unwanted acceleration since 2009. Bob Ruginis of Rhode Island petitioned the agency last year seeking an investigation of nearly 1.7 million 2006-2010 Corollas.

  • Former President Jimmy Carter: Gaza situation 'intolerable'

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    JERUSALEM (AP) — Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter said Saturday that eight months after a bloody war in the Gaza Strip the situation there remains "intolerable." Carter and his delegation were supposed to visit the isolated territory but earlier this week called it off siting unspecified security concerns. Speaking to reporters in Jerusalem, Carter said he was still determined to work for a Palestinian state in the West Bank and Gaza. "What we have seen and heard only strengthens our determination to work for peace," he said. "The situation in Gaza is intolerable. Eight months after a devastating war, not one destroyed house has been rebuilt and people cannot live with the respect and dignity they deserve.

  • Stars speak out about Baltimore; others won't risk it

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    LOS ANGELES (AP) — As the events in Baltimore continue to grip the nation, a few celebrities are raising their voices for the city and the cause. But experts say many stars are reluctant to address such heated emotional issues publicly. Artists such as Beyoncé, Cher, Dwayne Johnson, Jada Pinkett Smith and "Grey's Anatomy" actor Jesse Williams have taken to social media to demand change and share their thoughts on the death of 25-year-old Freddie Gray while in police custody. And some celebrities are expressing themselves in other ways. Former Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis and New York Knicks star Carmelo Anthony, who was raised in Baltimore, marched with the protesters this week.

  • Some 1,400 migrants saved by Italy, France in sea off Libya

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    ROME (AP) — Ships from Italy and France rescued more than 1,400 migrants on Saturday after smugglers' boats ran into trouble in the Mediterranean Sea near Libya. Italian officials said 1,200 migrants were being taken to Italian ports after several different rescue operations by its coast guard and navy, including helping some 200 people aboard motorized rubber dinghies a day earlier south of Sicily. The smugglers' boats had set out in a spell of warm, calm weather. In a French operation, another 217 migrants in three rubber dinghies were rescued by a Marine patrol boat and two suspected smugglers were detained in the seas north of Libya, the Maritime Prefecture in Toulon said. All were being turned over to Italian authorit

  • US to look into claim airstrike killed 52 civilians in Syria

    Updated: 15 hr ago

    BEIRUT (AP) — The U.S. military said Saturday it was looking into an activist group's claim that at least 52 civilians were killed in U.S.-led airstrikes near the Syrian border town of Kobani amid its campaign against the extremist Islamic State group. The strikes happened Thursday and Friday on the Syrian village of Bir Mahli, the Britain-based based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights said. The U.S.-led coalition said its strikes during that time destroyed seven Islamic State positions and one of the group's vehicles near Kobani, which Kurdish fighters ultimately pushed the extremists out of after months of intense fighting.

  • Migrant boat capsizes off Egyptian coast, killing 3

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    CAIRO (AP) — Egyptian security officials say a boat carrying mostly Sudanese and Syrian migrants has capsized off Egypt's Mediterranean coast, killing three people. Maj. Gen. Mohamed Ismail says 31 people were rescued Saturday and subsequently arrested after the boat capsized near the coastal city of Idku. Violence and poverty in the Middle East and Africa is driving a surge in refugees headed to Europe, with many crowded rafts capsizing and leaving hundreds feared dead. Libya in particular has been a hotspot for human trafficking, although boats occasionally try to leave from Egypt as well.

  • Activists: Suspected chemical attacks in Syria injure 40

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    BEIRUT (AP) — Suspected chlorine gas attacks by Syrian government helicopters injured some 40 people and killed a child in the country's northwest, activists said Saturday, a day after an international chemical weapons watchdog said it was ready to investigate a series of newly claimed attacks. Videos shared by the Syrian Civil Defense activist group showed medics and residents rushing children to a local hospital as they coughed, some gasping for air in Saraqeb, a town in Idlib province. A video from Nareb, another town in the province where a coalition of insurgent groups has made gains in recent days against troops loyal to President Bashar Assad, showed a medic receiving oxygen himself after rescuing people from another attac

  • BC-FL--Florida News Digest, FL

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    Hello! Here's a look at how AP's general news coverage is shaping up in Florida. Questions about coverage plans are welcome and should be directed to the AP-Miami bureau at 305-594-5825 or miami@ap.org. Melissa Nelson-Gabriel is on the desk. AP-Florida News Editor Terry Spencer can be reached at 305-594-5825 or tspencer@ap.org. A reminder this information is not for publication or broadcast, and these coverage plans are subject to change. Expected stories may not develop, or late-breaking and more newsworthy events may take precedence. Advisories and digests will keep you up to date. All times are Eastern. Some TV and radio stations will receive shorter APNewsNow versions of the stories below, along with all updates.

  • Qatar says Taliban, Afghan officials to hold 2 days of talks

    Updated: 16 hr ago

    DOHA, Qatar (AP) — Afghan and Taliban officials will hold two days of "reconciliation" talks in Qatar, the Gulf nation's state news agency reported Saturday, although both sides sought to downplay expectations from the meeting. The official Qatar News Agency did not identify the officials taking part in the talks, which it said began Saturday, citing Foreign Ministry official Yousif al-Sada. "The dialogue will be through open discussions about the Afghan reconciliation between all parties in Afghanistan," the agency said. In a statement, the Taliban earlier identified eight people they said would take part in the talks on their behalf. However, they said the discussions "should not be misconstrued as peace or negotiat

  • Officials: High participation across Colorado for new tests

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    DENVER (AP) — On the eve of the first round of Common Core testing, the Colorado State Board of Education declared its support for parents' right to choose to keep their children from being assessed. Some state lawmakers also took up the call, while parents who gathered at the state Legislature to urge lawmakers to scrap the new education standards tossed out opt-out rates as high as 40 percent. Districts as varied as the more than 34,000-student Aurora Public Schools to rural 151-student De Beque, however, reported high participation rates to AP, which communicated by phone or email with nearly half the states 178 superintendents in recent weeks. Urban Aurora estimated a 95 percent rate, and De Beque's was 96 percent.




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