• Ohio suspends license of funeral home after 11 bodies found

    Updated: 1 hr ago

    TOLEDO, Ohio (AP) — The state's funeral directors board on Tuesday quickly suspended the license of a funeral home where 11 bodies intended for cremation were found, some in a state of decay in a damp garage, according to investigators. The members of Ohio's Board of Embalmers and Funeral Directors said the funeral home's director had treated 10 of the bodies in a way that would outrage reasonable family and community sensibilities. The board, while suspending the license for both Tate Funeral Services in Toledo and its director, Robert Tate Jr., also said the funeral home held two of the bodies for more than two days without embalming or refrigeration.

  • Jim Bailey, impersonator of female show biz legends, dies

    Updated: 1 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — A singer-actor who transformed himself into such show biz legends as Judy Garland, Barbra Streisand and Peggy Lee during a career that spanned decades has died. Jim Bailey was 77. Manager Stephen Campbell says Bailey died Saturday in Los Angeles of complications from pneumonia. Bailey was a Philadelphia native. He performed at New York's Carnegie Hall, at London's Palladium and in numerous showrooms in Las Vegas and Atlantic City, New Jersey. In one notable engagement he impersonated Garland alongside her daughter Liza Minnelli. He appeared on variety shows including those of Ed Sullivan and Carol Burnett and was a guest 14 times on "The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson.

  • Noisy debate about storm-protection research off New Jersey

    Updated: 1 hr ago

    BARNEGAT LIGHT, N.J. (AP) — A plan to help the world's coastal regions protect themselves against killer weather like Superstorm Sandy is pitting a group of scientists against an array of environmentalists and politicians, who fear that it could harm dolphins, turtles and other marine life. The plan involves blasting the ocean floor off New Jersey with sound waves to study sediment dating back 60 million years to study how the shoreline has advanced and retreated in response to rising sea levels. The research project by Rutgers University, the University of Texas and the National Science Foundation is getting underway this week after an aborted attempt to do it last summer, when equipment problems scrapped it after a few da

  • Groups sue agency to block Shell's Arctic offshore drilling

    Updated: 1 hr ago

    ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Ten environmental groups Tuesday sued a federal agency over its approval of a plan by Royal Dutch Shell PLC for exploratory petroleum drilling off Alaska's northwest coast. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management last month signed off on Shell's exploratory drilling plan in the Chukchi Sea, which calls for two drill rigs and a support flotilla that includes spill-response vessels. Drilling in the Arctic Ocean region is opposed by environmental groups that contend oil companies are not equipped to deal with a major blowout or spill in a part of the world lacking deep-water ports, major airports and other infrastructure routinely present in other drilling areas. They also say drilling will harm wildlife

  • Police: Man fatally shot by officer was wielding metal pole

    Updated: 1 hr ago

    ARLINGTON, Va. (AP) — Virginia police say a man fatally shot last month by an Arlington police officer had been wielding a metal pole before shots were fired. The police department on Tuesday released additional details of the May 19 shooting that left 54-year-old Alfredo Rials-Torres dead and two officers injured. According to police, Rials-Torres slammed a door in officers' faces when they responded to a call for a domestic disturbance. Police say an officer wedged his foot in the door, prompting Rials-Torres to start swinging a metal pole. The officer then fired his stun gun but accidentally struck a fellow officer in the arm.

  • Atlanta man surrenders in shooting of Lil Wayne's tour bus

    Updated: 1 hr ago

    ATLANTA (AP) — Police in suburban Atlanta say a man accused of shooting at rapper Lil Wayne's tour bus has surrendered and is being held without bond. Cobb County police spokeswoman Alicia Chilton says Jimmy Carlton Winfrey of Atlanta is being held in connection with the shooting on March 26. County sheriff's records say Winfrey surrendered Tuesday afternoon. Authorities have said shots were fired at the rapper's tour bus as it traveled on a metro Atlanta interstate after a concert at an Atlanta club. No injuries were reported in the shooting. Sheriff's records say Winfrey is facing several charges including criminal damage to property, terroristic threats, aggravated assault and reckless conduct. Jail records d

  • Feds releasing plan for bull trout conservation in 5 states

    Updated: 1 hr ago

    BOISE, Idaho (AP) — Federal officials are releasing a plan Thursday to recover struggling bull trout populations in five Western states with the goal of lifting Endangered Species Act protections for the fish. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service proposes lifting protections individually in six recovery units spread over Idaho, western Montana, Washington, Oregon and a tiny portion of northern Nevada when specific requirements are met. The agency said the areas contain distinct populations of bull trout with unique characteristics. "We think the approach is tactical and appropriate," said Steve Duke, bull trout recovery planning coordinator for the agency.

  • National Lampoon to pay $3M to settle suit over transfers

    Updated: 1 hr ago

    INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — National Lampoon Inc. has agreed to pay $3 million to settle a lawsuit alleging that a financier convicted of swindling investors in an Ohio company fraudulently transferred millions of dollars from those investors to the entertainment company known for movies such as "Animal House." A judge must approve that proposed settlement, which was filed last week in federal bankruptcy court in Ohio. The bankruptcy trustee for Fair Finance Co. had sued National Lampoon in 2011, seeking more than $9 million and alleging that money was fraudulently moved from Fair Finance to the Los Angeles-based company which owns the rights to the "Vacation," ''Animal House" and "Van Wilder" movies.

  • Judge delays Hastert's arraignment in hush-money case

    Updated: 1 hr ago

    CHICAGO (AP) — A federal judge on Tuesday delayed former U.S. House Speaker Dennis Hastert's first court appearance until next week following his indictment in Chicago in a hush-money case. The Illinois Republican was scheduled to be arraigned Thursday, but the hearing has now been pushed back to June 9. The change was made without explanation in a one-sentence court filing by U.S. District Judge Thomas M. Durkin's clerk. The 73-year-old former congressman was charged last week in an indictment that alleges he agreed to pay $3.5 million to ensure someone from the town where he taught and coached high school wrestling stayed quiet about his "prior misconduct." Hastert hasn't spoken or appeared in public since his indic

  • Utah defends anti-polygamy law, saying it prevents abuse

    Updated: 1 hr ago

    SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Utah state attorneys defending the state's anti-polygamy law argue it should stay on the books because it protects women and children from abuse. The Utah Attorney General is appealing a ruling striking down key provisions of the law in the case of Kody Brown and his four wives, stars of the reality TV show "Sister Wives." The state says in newly filed court documents that monogamous marriage is an important social unit and court rulings dating back to 1878 have upheld laws against polygamy. "The United States Constitution does not protect the practice of polygamy as a fundamental right," state attorney Parker Douglas wrote.

  • Kentucky folksinger, dulcimer player Jean Ritchie dies at 92

    Updated: 1 hr ago

    NEW YORK (AP) — Jean Ritchie, the Kentucky-born folksinger who brought the centuries-old ballads she grew up with to a wide audience from the 1950s onward, died Monday evening. She was 92. Ritchie died in her home in Berea, Kentucky, with family around her, her niece Judy Hudson said. The tall, red-haired Ritchie, who grew up in Kentucky's Cumberland mountains, sang ballads with a clear soprano voice. She accompanied herself on the guitar, autoharp or the mountain dulcimer, a string instrument played while placed on the performer's lap that Ritchie helped rescue from obscurity. Among the hundreds of songs she performed were "Black is the Color of My True Love's Hair," ''Old Virginny," ''One Morning in May" and "Aunt Sal's S

  • Friendly fire likely hurt cop in battle with Boston bombers

    Updated: 1 hr ago

    BOSTON (AP) — It's "highly likely" that a police officer who was critically injured in a dramatic gunbattle with the Boston Marathon bombers was struck by friendly fire, a district attorney said Tuesday. Middlesex District Attorney Marian Ryan, whose office has been investigating the gunfight between officers and Tamerlan and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, said whatever wounded Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Officer Richard Donohue is still embedded in his leg, leaving investigators unable to confirm which gun fired the bullet. "We don't know what struck Officer Donohue because it has not been removed," she said at a news conference. "It is likely that it came from the gun of one of the officers attempting to stop Dzhokhar

  • Theater gunman says he wishes psychiatrist had locked him up

    Updated: 1 hr ago

    CENTENNIAL, Colo. (AP) — Colorado theater gunman James Holmes once said he wished a psychiatrist who treated him before the shootings had locked him up so the attack wouldn't have happened. In a videotape played for jurors in Holmes' murder trial Tuesday, Holmes also says he might not have carried out the attacks if the psychiatrist, Dr. Lynne Fenton, hadn't prescribed him a drug that reduced his anxiety and fear — but he says he might have done it later in life. Fenton didn't return a phone message Tuesday. She is expected to testify later in the trial. The videotape shown to jurors was from a court-ordered sanity evaluation of Holmes conducted last year by another psychiatrist, Dr. William Reid.

  • Man's red underwear leads to burglary arrest

    Updated: 1 hr ago

    HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. (AP) — The blue sneakers were the subject of the crime, but police say it was a man's red underwear that led to his arrest on Long Island. Police say 18-year-old Taykim Ross stole $200, electronics and Air Jordan sneakers from an apartment Monday and stopped in the backyard to try on the new kicks. That's when a neighbor snapped a photo of the suspect with red boxers visible above his jeans. Hempstead Village Officer Russell Harris says he was returning after a canvass of the neighborhood when he noticed someone taking garbage out. He saw someone bending over with "bright red underwear." Turns out, it was an exact match.

  • Former Maryland man held at Guantanamo alleges CIA torture

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    MIAMI (AP) — A former Maryland resident imprisoned at Guantanamo was subjected to mistreatment while in CIA custody far in excess of what has previously been disclosed, including being hung from a wooden beam for three days and kept in total darkness for nearly a year, a legal organization that represents him said Wednesday. Some details about the treatment of Majid Khan in the clandestine CIA detention center emerged in December when the Senate intelligence committee released a summary of a classified report critical of the agency's treatment of prisoners suspected of involvement with al-Qaida following the Sept. 11 terrorist attack.

  • Man under surveillance by terror investigators is killed

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    BOSTON (AP) — Authorities say a Boston man under 24-hour surveillance by terrorism investigators has been shot and killed outside a pharmacy after he lunged with a knife at a city police officer and an FBI agent. Police Commissioner William Evans said at a Tuesday afternoon news conference Usaama Rahim was shot at about 7 a.m. in the city's Roslindale neighborhood. Evans says the man was under surveillance by the Joint Terrorism Task Force. Evans says when a city officer and an FBI agent approached the man to talk to him, he pulled a military-style knife and lunged at them. He says both the officer and FBI agent opened fire. Authorities wouldn't say why Rahim was under surveillance, but Evans says a "level of al

  • A May to remember: US auto sales breeze past forecasts

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    DETROIT (AP) — U.S. auto sales were stronger than expected in May, boosted by Memorial Day promotions and strong demand for new SUVs. Sales rose 2 percent over last May to more than 1.64 million cars and trucks, their fastest pace since July 2005, according to Autodata Corp. Analysts had expected sales to fall slightly because of lower sales to rental car companies and other auto fleets. Subaru led automakers with a 12 percent sales gain. General Motors' sales rose 3 percent, Fiat Chrysler was up 4 percent and Honda rose 1 percent. All four automakers benefited as buyers continued a steady shift from cars into small and medium-sized SUVs. Honda sold more than 6,300 HR-V small SUVs in the first two weeks it was on sale

  • Obama: Israel's commitment to Palestinian state in doubt

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    JERUSALEM (AP) — President Barack Obama said in remarks broadcast Tuesday that Israel's prime minister had reinforced a belief by the international community that Israel is not committed to peace when he said there would be no Palestinian state on his watch. Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has walked back those comments, made in the frantic days before a March election, asserting that he is committed to a Palestinian state under certain conditions. But Obama said the initial comments were "fairly unequivocal." "Already, the international community does not believe that Israel is serious about a two-state solution.

  • San Francisco leaders to vote on luxury condo moratorium

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — Check out rental sites for San Francisco, especially the trendier parts: Well over $3,000 a month for a one-bedroom flat and nearly $5,000 for two bedrooms. Finding a place to live has become so expensive and emotional that city supervisors are considering a 45-day moratorium on luxury housing in the Mission District, which has long been one of the most diverse neighborhoods in the city. The area, home to taquerias and corner markets, is now teeming with Silicon Valley workers and the pricey restaurants that cater to them. Fancy high-rises are planned to take over dilapidated street corners, including one that tenant activists have dubbed the "Monster in the Mission," a 345-unit building with rent

  • Agency cancels mistakenly scheduled hearing in soda death

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    ROGERSVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — The Tennessee Department of Correction has canceled a hearing that had been mistakenly scheduled to determine whether to shorten the sentence of a woman convicted of killing her stepdaughter by forcing her to drink grape soda. Department spokeswoman Neysa Taylor said 58-year-old Mary Vaughn was mistakenly certified for a hearing on June 15. Vaughn was sentenced six months ago to 15 years for aggravated child abuse and 20 years for second-degree murder. It was not immediately clear when a new hearing would be scheduled. Prosecutors said Vaughn and her husband forced 5-year-old Alexa Linboom to drink grape soda as punishment, killing her in January 2012. Vaughn's husband was also sentenced to 3




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