• Myanmar opposition leader Suu Kyi visits flood-hit area

    Yesterday

    BAGO, Myanmar (AP) — Myanmar opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi visited one of the country's many flood-afflicted areas Monday, raising her profile during a national disaster that has killed at least 46 people and could affect this November's general election. Over the weekend President Thein Sein visited the areas in central Myanmar hit hardest by flooding from almost continuous rains since mid-July. On Friday, he declared four areas of the country disaster zones, but only after he had come under a barrage of criticism in the press and on social media for failing to quickly mobilize relief.

  • Image of Asia: Drinkable water for flood-hit Indian villages

    Yesterday

    In this photo by Bikas Das, relief workers carry plastic pouches of drinking water for distribution after flooding in Khudirabad village near Kolkata, in India's West Bengal state. Cooked food was also delivered to residents in affected areas. The Home Ministry says more than 100 people have died due to the heavy rains and flooding in the past week and tens of thousands of people have been forced to take shelter in state-run relief camps. The annual monsoon, which lasts from June through September, often brings flooding to India, and the situation in West Bengal was worsened by a recent cyclone.

  • Malaysian agency: Money in Najib's accounts came from donors

    Yesterday

    KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Malaysia's anti-corruption agency said Monday that $700 million in Prime Minister Najib Razak's personal bank accounts came from donations, not from a debt-ridden state investment fund. The Malaysian Anti-Corruption Commission effectively cleared Najib of any criminal wrongdoing. In early July, The Wall Street Journal reported that the money came into Najib's accounts from entities linked to the 1MDB state investment fund. The commission said in a statement that its investigation showed the money was "contributions from donors, and not funds from 1MDB"and that it had referred its findings to the attorney-general. It did not identify the donors or say how the money was spent.

  • Indian Parliament speaker bars 25 lawmakers for 'disorder'

    Yesterday

    NEW DELHI (AP) — The speaker of India's Parliament on Monday barred 25 opposition legislators from its sessions for the rest of the week for causing "grave disorder" after they created noisy scenes. Parliament has been unable to conduct any business for weeks as the opposition has been demanding that two leaders of the ruling Bharatiya Janata Party resign for allegedly helping a former Indian cricket official facing investigation for financial irregularities. After admonishing the lawmakers for wearing black armbands and carrying placards inside the house, Sumitra Mahajan, speaker of the powerful lower house, suspended the members of the Congress party. They were barred from entering the premises for the rest of the week.

  • India orders telecoms to block more than 850 adult websites

    Yesterday

    NEW DELHI (AP) — India has ordered Internet service providers to block access to more than 850 adult websites in what the government has described as a way to protect social decency. N.N. Kaul, a spokesman for India's department of telecom, said Monday that the government was trying to control easy access to pornography following a directive from the country's top court. Kaul said that while Internet service providers in India will have to bar access, users may still view the sites through virtual private networks and proxy servers. He said the move would protect children. The leaked government order, dated last Friday, orders Internet service providers to block access to the 857 sites on grounds of morality and decen

  • IOC ready to act if Olympic medals affected by doping

    Yesterday

    KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — The IOC will take action against any Olympic athletes if they are found guilty of the latest doping allegations rocking the sport of track and field, IOC President Thomas Bach said Monday. Bach said it is up to the World Anti-Doping Agency to investigate the allegations, including that one-third of medals in endurance races at the Olympics and world championships from 2001 to 2012 were won by athletes who recorded suspicious blood tests. "If there should be cases involving results at Olympic Games, the IOC will react with zero tolerance with our usual policy," Bach said. German broadcaster ARD and The Sunday Times newspaper in Britain said they obtained access to the results of 12,000 blo

  • Sepp Blatter's term as IOC member ends

    Yesterday

    KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Outgoing FIFA president Sepp Blatter's 16-year term as an International Olympic Committee member ended Monday when he did not seek re-election. Blatter was among a group of IOC members up for re-election for another eight-year term. But IOC President Thomas Bach said Blatter informed him by letter on July 23 that he would not stand again. "He does not deem it to be appropriate to stand for re-election for eight years knowing that after seven months his term would come to an end," Bach said on the final day of the IOC's general assembly in Kuala Lumpur. Blatter, beset by a corruption scandal at FIFA and whose presidential term will end following a Feb. 26 election, did not attend the IOC m

  • AC/DC's Rudd pleads not guilty to breaching detention rules

    Updated: Sun, Aug 2, 2015

    WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — AC/DC drummer Phil Rudd pleaded not guilty on Monday to breaching the rules of his home detention sentence by drinking alcohol. A New Zealand judge allowed Rudd to remain in home confinement on bail pending a November hearing on the possible breach. The 61-year-old Australian-born drummer could face further sanctions, including jail time, if the judge concludes Rudd was in breach of his conditions. However, drinking alcohol would likely be considered on the lower end of potential breaches. Asked by reporters after the hearing if he was nervous about what lay ahead in the case, Rudd replied: "No, the only thing I'm nervous about is I don't, I don't actually don't know what's going on.

  • Rahal wins in Ohio, pulls within 9 points of Montoya

    Updated: Sun, Aug 2, 2015

    LEXINGTON, Ohio (AP) — Racing in his home state — and only a few laps from tightening the IndyCar standings with a big victory — Graham Rahal still had one more big restart to sweat out. On lap 84 of 90, he and Justin Wilson battled for position, with Rahal eventually staying in front. "If you ever want to race against anybody in that situation, it's Justin Wilson, who is by far the most fair guy out here," Rahal said. "I was nervous on that last restart because we didn't have push-to-pass and he did. Obviously he got fully around me pretty much, but still gave me room and I just slid down underneath him there and took off. "I knew if I got out front, I felt very confident that nobody could catch me.

  • Monsoon rains kill more than 100 people in India

    Updated: Sun, Aug 2, 2015

    NEW DELHI (AP) — Heavy monsoon rains have killed more than 100 people in India in the past week and forced tens of thousands of people to take shelter in state-run relief camps, India's Home Ministry said Sunday. A cyclone struck the worst-hit state of West Bengal, where 48 people have been killed and nearly 215,000 villagers have been taken to relief camps after heavy rains triggered flooding, the ministry statement said. More than 200 medical teams using 120 boats have reached the area. Authorities said they have so far distributed over 400,000 drinking water pouches, in an effort to prevent the outbreak of water-borne diseases. Another 28 deaths were reported from western Rajasthan state. Rescue workers evacuated n

  • Internal dispute over Taliban succession hints at rifts

    Updated: Sun, Aug 2, 2015

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — The brother of Mullah Mohammad Omar on Sunday joined a growing chorus of opposition to the opaque selection of the late Taliban leader's successor, indicating widening rifts within the militant group as it weighs whether to revive peace talks or intensify its 14-year insurgency in Afghanistan. As the leadership crisis deepened, the Taliban released a statement from one of its most notorious commanders pledging loyalty to Mullah Akhtar Mohammad Mansoor, who was chosen to lead after the death of the Taliban's reclusive, one-eyed founder was announced last week. The statement quoted Jalaluddin Haqqani, the head of the Haqqani Network, a Pakistan-based outfit blamed for scores of complex attacks on U.S

  • Malaysia seeks help in finding more possible MH370 debris

    Updated: Sun, Aug 2, 2015

    KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — Malaysian officials said Sunday that they would seek help from territories near the island where a suspected piece of the missing Malaysia Airlines jet was discovered to try to find more plane debris. A new piece of debris, meanwhile, found on Sunday on the French island of Reunion in the western Indian Ocean turned out to be a "domestic ladder," and doesn't belong to a plane, Malaysian Director General of Civil Aviation Azharuddin Abdul Rahman told The Associated Press amid media reports that a new plane part was found.

  • Italy honors Australian aviator killed in '33 Tuscany crash

    Updated: Sun, Aug 2, 2015

    ROME (AP) — An Australian aviation pioneer has been honored with a memorial stone and a hiking path in the Apennine mountains, where he died in a plane crash in 1933. A great-nephew of aviator Bert Hinkler, the Australian ambassador to Italy, and a local man in his 90s who recalled how people looked to the sky as the plane crashed were among those attending the ceremony Sunday in the mountains near Arezzo, in Tuscany, Italy. Ambassador Mike Rann called Hinkler an Australian hero, but stressed the aviator had worldwide fame, too. Rann recalled how Hinkler was the first to fly solo from Britain to Australia and the second person, after Charles Lindbergh, to fly alone across the Atlantic. An 8.4 kilometer (5-mile) long t

  • Myanmar's president visits area worst-hit by flooding

    Updated: Sun, Aug 2, 2015

    KALAY, Myanmar (AP) — Myanmar's president on Sunday visited one of the worst-hit areas of the flood-stricken country, saying that water levels are slowly receding and that he hopes people can soon return to their homes. President Thein Sein spoke from Kalay town in Sagaing division in northwestern Myanmar, where two weeks of rain has caused severe flooding, cutting off the area from land transport. He told state TV that the government plans to begin reconstruction once evacuated people return to their homes. The TV report also showed flood victims gathered at a Buddhist monastery, where they were handed aid items. A report issued Saturday by the U.N.

  • IOC shakes up bid process for 2024 Summer Olympics

    Updated: Sun, Aug 2, 2015

    KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — The IOC has shaken up the bidding process for the 2024 Summer Olympics, eliminating the cut-down phase and clearing the way for all the candidates to make it to the final vote. The decision, announced Sunday at the International Olympic Committee's general assembly, opens the prospect of a crowded field of as many as seven cities battling it out over a two-year global campaign. There will no longer be a short list of finalists, as in previous bid races. IOC executive director Christophe Dubi tells The Associated Press: "If it's a flood, it's a good problem to have.

  • Emotional scenes as South Sudan gains Olympic status

    Updated: Sun, Aug 2, 2015

    KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — With an Olympic flag draped around his neck, the official from South Sudan couldn't contain his emotion. Moments after his war-torn country was officially recognized by the IOC on Sunday, Tong Chor Malke Deran wiped tears from his eyes and later broke down when talking about the plight of his nation's athletes. The decision means the world's newest nation will be able to have its competitors enter the stadium in Rio de Janeiro next year behind their own flag. More importantly, the country's near non-existent sporting infrastructure and athletes will receive funding assistance from the IOC. South Sudan, which split from Sudan and became independent in 2011, has been hit by civil war for th

  • More online, more on mobile: advertising executive to IOC

    Updated: Sun, Aug 2, 2015

    KUALA LUMPUR, Malaysia (AP) — A leading advertising executive told the IOC on Sunday that the Olympic body needs to stay relevant with the younger generation and concentrate more of its content on the Internet and via mobile devices. And the once futuristic-sounding technology of virtual reality will likely be part of the planning. Martin Sorrell, chief executive officer of advertising agency WPP, said the International Olympic Committee was in a unique position because its biggest asset was its live content. "Live sports coverage is the last bastion of high-value traditional programming," Sorrell said, adding that most consumers want to watch video when and where they choose. "But they can't do that with live s

  • Australia's House speaker quits over travel expense scrutiny

    Updated: Sun, Aug 2, 2015

    SYDNEY (AP) — The speaker of Australia's House of Representatives has resigned following weeks of accusations that she used taxpayer money to pay for extravagant and unnecessary travel. Bronwyn Bishop has faced fierce criticism since it emerged last month that she spent more than 5,000 Australian dollars ($3,650) to charter a helicopter for an 80-kilometer (50-mile) trip to a golf course to attend a fundraiser for the ruling Liberal Party, rather than drive the 90-minute route. The Finance Department is investigating whether she violated any rules. Prime Minister Tony Abbott announced Bishop's resignation on Sunday. He said there would be a review of lawmaker entitlements in the wake of the scandal.

  • New Afghan Taliban leader promises to continue insurgency

    Updated: Sat, Aug 1, 2015

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Political uncertainty inside the Taliban has cast doubt on the prospects for an end to the war in Afghanistan. On Saturday the Taliban's controversial new leader vowed to continue fighting while urging unity among his followers in a message aimed at preventing a split in the group between those who want peace and those who still believe they can win. An audio message purportedly from newly elected Taliban leader Mullah Akhtar Mohammad Mansoor came as cracks in the Taliban's previously united front widened, two days after the group confirmed an Afghan government report that reclusive longtime leader, Mullah Mohammad Omar, had died. The 30-minute speech attributed to Mansoor was emailed to The Associated P

  • Lawsuit: Bosses let rules-breaking sailor compete in Cup

    Updated: Sat, Aug 1, 2015

    SAN DIEGO (AP) — Top officials with Oracle Team USA knew grinder Matt Mitchell didn't illegally alter a catamaran used in warmup regattas and yet let a rules-breaking sailor compete in the 2013 America's Cup, according to a lawsuit filed in federal court in San Francisco. Mitchell, of Auckland, New Zealand, is suing Oracle Team USA for $400,000 in damages. Mitchell, one of several Oracle sailors punished in the biggest cheating scandal in the regatta's history, was suspended for the first four races of the match, effectively ending his America's Cup career. Mitchell contends OTUSA management knew grinder Simeon Tienpont broke rules yet let him sail. Tienpont operated the complicated hydrofoil system.




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