• Myanmar military plane crash kills 4

    Yesterday

    NAYPYITAW, Myanmar (AP) — Four Myanmar military personnel were killed and one survived when an air force utility aircraft crashed after taking off from the airport in the capital Naypyitaw. An Information Ministry statement identified the aircraft, which crashed Wednesday morning in a rice field about a mile (1.6 kilometers) from the airport, as a Beech 1900, a 19-passenger twin-engine turboprop no longer in production. Photos of the crashed plane showed that most of its fuselage had burned up. The office of the Myanmar army commander identified the dead passengers as one major, two captains and a corporal, and said the sole survivor was another corporal who has been hospitalized.

  • Woman finds artwork by father killed in Vietnam

    Yesterday

    SAN DIEGO (AP) — Erika Colligan spent three decades searching for her father's artwork — paintings the South Vietnam pilot made for the U.S. Air Force aviators who trained him during the Vietnam war. The 50-year-old San Diego software consultant was only 1 when her father died in a plane crash in his native country in 1966. At age 10, her family fled Vietnam and came to the United States, leaving behind their belongings and his artwork. Colligan believes most of his paintings were destroyed after the Communist government took power, but she kept faith some of the artwork Phan Khoi made for his American friends was still out there, offering a tangible sliver of the father she never got the chance to know.

  • Sikh man blocked by Mexican airline satisfied with apology

    Updated: Tue, Feb 9, 2016

    MEXICO CITY (AP) — An Indian-American actor and designer who wasn't allowed to board a Mexico City-to-New York flight after refusing to remove his turban said Tuesday that he is satisfied with an apology from the airline. Waris Ahluwalia said he is now waiting for Aeromexico to implement special training on how to treat Sikh passengers, for whom the headgear carries deep religious significance. "We're just a few steps away from a lot of hugs," Ahluwalia told The Associated Press. Aeromexico issued a statement Tuesday saying: "We apologize to Mr. Waris Ahluwalia for the unfortunate experience he had with one of our security guards during the boarding process prior to his flight to New York at the Mexico City Internatio

  • Australia commits to legal growing of medicinal marijuana

    Updated: Tue, Feb 9, 2016

    CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australian lawmakers committed on Wednesday to legalize the growing of marijuana for medical use within a part of the world renowned for zero-tolerance and harsh penalties for illegal drugs. The government introduced a bill to Parliament that would amend the Narcotics Drugs Act 1967 and create a licensing scheme for growing medicinal cannabis. Marijuana is currently illegal throughout Australia, but two states are considering making the drug available for therapeutic uses. "This government understands that there are some Australians suffering from severe conditions for which cannabis may have applications and we want to enable access to the most effective medical treatments available," Health Mini

  • Australia drops charge against suspected Kurdish militant

    Updated: Tue, Feb 9, 2016

    CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — The government has dropped a charge against an Australian man accused of preparing to fight with Kurdish militants against the Islamic State movement. Jamie Williams, 28, was stopped by customs agents as he was boarding a flight to Qatar at Melbourne airport in December 2014 after military-style equipment and clothing were allegedly found in his luggage. He was charged with preparing for an incursion into a foreign country for the purpose of engaging in hostile activities. Attorney-General George Brandis said in a statement Wednesday that he had decided that prosecutors should drop the charge. He did not explain why he declined to give the consent needed for the prosecution to proceed.

  • Closely fought Philippine presidential race gets underway

    Updated: Tue, Feb 9, 2016

    MANILA, Philippines (AP) — Philippine presidential candidates launched their campaigns Tuesday in festive showbiz-style rallies to draw in the crowds in what is emerging as a closely fought contest to lead one of Asia's most unwieldy democracies. From Manila's slums to the countryside, the candidates competed to captivate the Filipino everyman at the start of a 3-month campaign leading to the May 9 vote. They promised to cure the same ailments that have hounded the Southeast Asian nation for decades: widespread poverty, corruption, crime and insurgencies. President Benigno Aquino III's single six-year term ends in June.

  • Pakistan army training aircraft crashes, 2 dead

    Updated: Tue, Feb 9, 2016

    ISLAMABAD (AP) — Pakistan's army says a training aircraft has crashed near Gujranwala in the eastern Punjab province, killing the instructor and trainee who were on board. An army statement Tuesday said the Mushaq aircraft was on a routine training flight when it crashed in a field. The army did not say what caused the crash.

  • Sushil Koirala, Nepal's former prime minister, dies at 78

    Updated: Tue, Feb 9, 2016

    KATHMANDU, Nepal (AP) — Sushil Koirala, a former Nepalese prime minister and leader of the nation's largest political party, has died in Kathmandu. He was 78. His doctor, Karbir Nath Yogi, said Tuesday that Koirala died due to complications from pneumonia and respiratory failure. Koirala was a key figure in the adoption of Nepal's new constitution last September. After ethnic Madhesis later blocked border points with India and imposed a general strike in southern Nepal to protest against the constitution, Koirala attempted to resolve the issue by negotiating with the protesters. Koirala spent his life in politics fighting for democracy in Nepal and led protests in 2006 that ended a centuries-old monarchy and turned Ne

  • Indonesia sentences 7 for IS links, as Bashir files appeal

    Updated: Tue, Feb 9, 2016

    JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — An Indonesian court on Tuesday sentenced seven men for conspiring with the Islamic State group, the first time the country has sent anyone to prison for IS links, as radical cleric Abu Bakar Bashir appealed his conviction. A three-judge panel at the West Jakarta District Court found four men guilty of violating Indonesia's anti-terrorism law by joining Islamic State jihadists and attending the group's military-style training. Ahmad Junaedi, Ridwan Sungkar, Helmi Muhammad Alamudi and Abdul Hakim Munabari were sentenced to between three and four years imprisonment. Their recruiters, Aprimul Henry and Koswara Ibnu Abdullah, were sentenced to three and four years in jail for helping them go to Syria.

  • UN official asks Sri Lanka to locate people missing from war

    Updated: Tue, Feb 9, 2016

    COLOMBO, Sri Lanka (AP) — The top United Nations human rights official asked Sri Lanka's government on Tuesday to quickly locate thousands of civilians reported missing during the country's civil war. The government has said most are probably dead. Many ethnic Tamil civilians have not been heard from since they were taken from their homes by police or military personnel or abducted by pro-government militias during the war, which ended in 2009. Tamil politicians have handed over a list of more than 4,000 people reported missing to visiting U.N. High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra'ad al-Hussein, with the dates and locations they were last seen.

  • Indian soldier buried by avalanche saved; 9 bodies recovered

    Updated: Tue, Feb 9, 2016

    SRINAGAR, India (AP) — An Indian soldier buried by an avalanche for six days in the Himalayan region of Kashmir has been found alive and was pulled from the snow, along with the bodies of nine other soldiers, officials said Tuesday. The enormous avalanche slammed into an Indian army post last Wednesday and trapped the 10 soldiers on the northern end of Siachen Glacier, the highest point along the heavily militarized line of control between India and Pakistan. After a day of searching for survivors, the army had said Thursday that the chance of finding survivors was "very remote.

  • Indian scientists study chunk that fell from sky, killed man

    Updated: Tue, Feb 9, 2016

    NEW DELHI (AP) — Scientists are analyzing a small blue object that plummeted from the sky and killed a man in southern India, after authorities said it was a meteorite. The object slammed into the ground at an engineering college over the weekend, shattering a water cooler and sending splinters and shards flying. Police say a bus driver standing nearby was hit by the debris and died while being taken to a hospital. College principal G. Bhaskar said he heard a loud thud from his office, where several window panes shattered when the object hit the ground.

  • Guam ban on smoking in bars to become law in 2017

    Updated: Tue, Feb 9, 2016

    HAGATNA, Guam (AP) — Smoking in bars will be prohibited in Guam next year under a measure that expands provisions to the island's anti-smoking law. The Pacific Daily News reports (http://bit.ly/20lu59H ) that the Legislature voted last month in favor of expanding the Natasha Smoking Act to include bars in the list of establishments where indoor smoking is prohibited. The new provision takes effect Jan. 1, 2017. The legislation lapsed into law without Gov. Eddie Calvo's signature. A spokesman for the governor's office, Oyaol Ngirairikl, says Calvo has supported efforts to reduce smoking rates on Guam, but is concerned about the "invasion" of government in the private lives of citizens.

  • 2015 sets record for most shark attacks, with 98 worldwide

    Updated: Mon, Feb 8, 2016

    GAINESVILLE, Fla. (AP) — Experts say 2015 saw a record-setting 98 unprovoked shark attacks worldwide, including 30 in Florida alone. The Florida Museum of Natural History released the numbers Monday. Scientists say the previous record was 88 attacks in 2000. International Shark Attack File curator George Burgess says attacks are expected to continue to increase as human populations grow and shark populations recover. Of the six fatalities last year, two happened off the Indian Ocean island of Reunion; the others occurred off Australia, Egypt, New Caledonia and the United States. The U.S. led the world with 59 attacks, including those in Florida, eight in each of the Carolinas and seven in Hawaii.

  • American star Evie Stevens to attempt world hour record

    Updated: Mon, Feb 8, 2016

    Olympic cyclist Evelyn Stevens will attempt to break the world hour record later this month at the recently renovated velodrome at the U.S. Olympic training center in Colorado Springs, Colorado. The distance traveled in an hour is one of the most hallowed challenges in cycling. But only in the past couple of years — since the sport's governing body, the UCI, modernized and simplified rules for an attempt — has the record received renewed interest from some of the world's best riders. "While attempting to break the hour record is exciting for me and my career, I'm also proud to help shine a light on women's cycling," said Stevens, who will make her attempt on Feb. 22. The current record of 46.882 kilometers was set b

  • India Internet ruling blocks Facebook 'Free Basics' program

    Updated: Mon, Feb 8, 2016

    SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — India's government has essentially banned a Facebook program that sought to connect with low-income residents by offering free access to a limited version of the social network and other Internet services. The ruling is a major setback for Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg, who had lobbied hard for the program as part of a campaign to expand Internet access in developing countries. It's a victory for critics who argued that Facebook's "Free Basics" program gave an unfair advantage to some Internet services over others. Facebook has introduced "Free Basics" in partnership with wireless carriers in dozens of emerging nations, where the company hopes to get more people online.

  • Suspect in murder of dismembered Spaniard in Thai custody

    Updated: Mon, Feb 8, 2016

    BANGKOK (AP) — A Spanish man who is the prime suspect in the gruesome murder of a fellow Spaniard was in Thai custody Monday after being arrested in Cambodia, where he fled after the victim's dismembered body was recovered over several days from Bangkok's Chao Phraya River. The suspect, identified as Artur Segarra Princep, 36, was arrested Sunday evening at a restaurant in the Cambodian coastal town of Sihanoukville where he had checked into a guesthouse a few days earlier, regional Cambodian police chief Gen. Chuon Narin said Monday. "We received a request from Thai police to arrest this man, and after launching an investigation we found him," Chuon Narin said. Thai police sent a helicopter to Cambodia and it returne

  • Philippine autonomy delay stalls disarming of Muslim rebels

    Updated: Mon, Feb 8, 2016

    MANILA, Philippines (AP) — A Philippine rebel leader said Monday that Congress' failure to pass a Muslim autonomy bill as part of a new peace pact would delay a program to disarm thousands of guerrillas in the country's south. Mohagher Iqbal said his rebel group, the Moro Islamic Liberation Front, will stick with a 2014 peace agreement it signed with the Philippine government despite the setback. However, Iqbal said the delay in the enactment of the bill that aims to establish a more powerful and better-funded autonomous region for minority Muslims has caused deep anxiety among guerrillas, and that the uncertainty could be exploited by radicals opposed to the peace deal.

  • Image of Asia: On patrol at holy confluence of Indian rivers

    Updated: Mon, Feb 8, 2016

    In this photo by Rajesh Kumar Singh, police on horses patrol as thousands of Hindus perform rituals at the Sangam, the confluence of the Ganges, Yamuna, and the mythical Saraswati rivers during the Magh Mela fair in Allahabad, India. Hundreds of thousands of pilgrims will bathe in the confluence during the annual festival, hoping to wash away their sins. Monday is the morning of the new moon, or "Mauni Amavasya," the most auspicious and most popular day for the ritual.

  • Coldplay's latest video criticized for portrayal of India

    Updated: Mon, Feb 8, 2016

    NEW DELHI (AP) — British rock band Coldplay's latest music video has triggered a debate in India over its portrayal of the country with critics accusing its producers of showing stereotypical images of India with Hindu holy men, peacocks and colorful festivals. Coldplay featured Beyonce in their Super Bowl half-time show Sunday, but they didn't perform their new collaboration, "Hymn for the Weekend." The four-minute video of the song shows Coldplay being chased and pelted with color as residents celebrate Holi, the Indian festival of color. Many Indians say it stereotypes India as the land of holy men and pagan festival rituals. They say the video ignores changes in India following the economic boom that has changed t




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