• Taliban kill 6 Afghan policemen in ambush

    Updated: Wed, Sep 17, 2014

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — A provincial security official says that Taliban fighters killed six Afghan policemen in an ambush in western Afghanistan. Raouf Ahmadi, spokesman for the provincial police chief in Herat province, said Wednesday that six other police were wounded in the assault late Tuesday. Ahmadi said that eight Taliban fighters were also killed in the battle. The Interior Ministry said Tuesday that more than 1,500 police have been killed in Taliban attacks over the last six months. Afghanistan's security forces have faced increasing pressure on the battlefield this year as U.S. and other NATO forces continue to withdraw, resulting in higher casualties. Most U.S. and other NATO troops will leave Afghanista

  • Fijians go to polls after 8 years of military rule

    Updated: Wed, Sep 17, 2014

    WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Thousands of Fijians got their first chance to vote in eight years Wednesday in an election that promises to finally restore democracy to the South Pacific nation of 900,000. Yet as polls opened Wednesday morning, plenty of questions remain about how far military ruler Voreqe Bainimarama has tilted the outcome in his favor. Bainimarama is running as a candidate and polls indicate his party is by far the most popular of the seven contesting the election. The question appears to be not whether his Fiji First party will receive the most votes, but whether it will gain an outright majority of Parliament's 50 seats under Fiji's new proportional system.

  • Landslides triggered by storm kill 7 in Vietnam

    Updated: Wed, Sep 17, 2014

    HANOI, Vietnam (AP) — Landslides triggered by heavy rains from a tropical storm have killed at least seven people in northern Vietnam. The chief administrator of Lang Son province's Cao Loc district, Hua Anh Tuan, says six people were killed and five others were injured when a landslide buried the hut they were sleeping in early Wednesday. A 5-year-old girl was killed and her mother was injured when another landslide struck their house. Tropical Storm Kalmaegi was downgraded from a typhoon when it struck northern coastal Vietnam on Tuesday night. About 55,000 people in four northern coastal provinces were evacuated ahead of the storm. The typhoon slammed into the northern Philippines on Monday, unleashing flooding and

  • Lava flows from Philippine volcano; thousands flee

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    MANILA, Philippines (AP) — The Philippines' most active volcano has sent more huge lava fragments rolling down its slopes in an ongoing gentle eruption that has prompted authorities to evacuate thousands of villagers, officials said Wednesday. The Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology has warned that a "hazardous eruption" of Mount Mayon, located in the eastern Philippines, is possible within weeks. Increased restiveness was recorded overnight, including 270 incidents of lava fragments and super-hot boulders rolling down from Mayon's crater — nearly four times the number recorded the previous day. Some reached the upper portion of a gully on the volcano's southeastern side, indicating that the lava dome has b

  • Australia promises $6.4 million to fight Ebola

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia announced on Wednesday it will immediately provide an additional 7 million Australian dollars ($6.4 million) to help the international response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. The country had previously committed AU$1 million to the international response to the viral disease outbreak that has killed at least 2,400 people. The World Health Organization says the death toll from Ebola could rise to more than 20,000. The fresh funds include AU$2 million requested by Britain to help that country deliver medical services in Sierra Leone, Foreign Minister Julie Bishop said in a statement. Another AU$2.5 million will go to the World Health Organization's consolidated regional respon

  • Scientists' colossal squid exam a kraken good show

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — It was a calm morning in Antarctica's remote Ross Sea, during the season when the sun never sets, when Capt. John Bennett and his crew hauled up a creature with tentacles like fire hoses and eyes like dinner plates from a mile below the surface. A colossal squid: 350 kilograms (770 pounds), as long as a minibus and one of the sea's most elusive species. It had been frozen for eight months until Tuesday, when scientists in New Zealand got a long-anticipated chance to thaw out the animal and inspect it — once they used a forklift to maneuver it into a tank. Colossal squid sometimes inhabit the world of fiction and imagination, but have rarely been seen in daylight.

  • Fijians go to polls after 8 years of military rule

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — Thousands of Fijians got their first chance to vote in eight years Wednesday in an election that promises to finally restore democracy to the South Pacific nation of 900,000. Yet as polls opened Wednesday morning, plenty of questions remain about how far military ruler Voreqe Bainimarama has tilted the outcome in his favor. Bainimarama is running as a candidate and polls indicate his party is by far the most popular of the seven contesting the election. The question appears to be not whether his Fiji First party will receive the most votes, but whether it will gain an outright majority of Parliament's 50 seats under Fiji's new proportional system.

  • Thai police search for clues after 2 Brits slain

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    BANGKOK (AP) — Police on a scenic Thai resort island searched hotels and workers' residences Tuesday looking for clues into the slayings of two British tourists whose nearly naked, battered bodies were found on a beach a day earlier. More than 70 police officers were deployed to Koh Tao, a popular diving destination in the Gulf of Thailand, as the country's leaders called for a swift investigation into the brutal killings that were a new blow to Thailand's tourism industry. "This should not have happened in Thailand. It will affect our image in the eyes of international countries," said Prime Minister Gen. Prayuth Chan-ocha. He also urged the media to warn tourists about travel safety in Thailand.

  • Survey finds skepticism about trade's benefits

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    WASHINGTON (AP) — Americans, Japanese and many Europeans aren't sold on the benefits of trade. They doubt that global economic ties create jobs or raise wages, an international survey conducted by the Pew Research Center shows. But people China and other low- and middle-income countries are far more convinced that trade delivers jobs and higher wages, Pew said Tuesday in releasing the results of its survey of 48,643 people in 44 countries. The center found that 50 percent of Americans say trade destroys jobs, while just 20 percent say it creates them. Only Italians — 59 percent of whom see trade as a job killer — have a more negative view. The French and Japanese are also far more likely to view trade as a job destroyer

  • Sri Lanka backs China's maritime 'Silk Road' plan

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    COLOMBO, Sri Lanka (AP) — Chinese President Xi Jinping won Sri Lanka's support Tuesday for a proposed maritime "Silk Road" linking China with Europe, and helped launch billion-dollar power plant and port city projects funded by his government. Xi, the first Chinese leader to visit Sri Lanka in 28 years, and President Mahinda Rajapaksa oversaw the signing of 27 agreements in areas, including highways and the construction of a joint coastal and marine research center. They also agreed to start negotiations on a free trade agreement. Xi is visiting countries in South Asia this week to seek closer relations and support for his vision of a modern "Silk Road" sea route between China and Europe.

  • Image of Asia: Kicking off the Asian Games

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    In this photo by Rob Griffith, North Korea's Yunmi Kim attempts to kick the ball from Vietnam's goalkeeper Thi Kieu Trinh Dang during a women's soccer match at the Asian Games in Incheon, South Korea. The North Korean women won silver in the 2010 games and are among the favorites for gold this year. They won the match against Vietnam 5-0. As at the men's opening match a day earlier, the North Korean women were cheered on by a small but enthusiastic contingent of local supporters. The opening ceremony for the Asian Games is Friday.

  • Afghan suicide bomber kills 3 foreign troops

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — A Taliban attacker detonated his car bomb next to an international military convoy on Tuesday, killing three members of the NATO-led force and wounding nearly 20 troops and civilians, officials said. Security forces in full battle gear administered CPR to wounded comrades shortly after the early morning blast that rattled nearby neighborhoods and sent a plume of smoke high into the sky. The attack happened only a couple hundred yards from the U.S. Embassy, on a main Kabul road that leads to the airport. The statement from the military coalition known as ISAF said five troops were wounded in addition to the three killed, but did not disclose their nationalities. The Polish Defense Ministry said one

  • Stagnant floodwater raising health risk in Kashmir

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    SRINAGAR, India (AP) — Health workers were scrambling Tuesday to manage a mounting health crisis nearly two weeks after massive flooding engulfed much of Kashmir, and were treating cases of diarrhea, skin allergies and fungus while hoping the stagnant waters do not create conditions for more serious disease outbreaks. Countless bloated livestock carcasses were floating across the waterlogged Himalayan region. Many residents, warned to avoid the floodwaters, were rationing water bottles brought by aid workers every few days. "The chance of cholera, jaundice and leptospirosis spreading are high," said Dr. Swati Jha with the aid group Americares. "The most essential need right now is that of clean water.

  • AP names Lynne O'Donnell Kabul bureau chief

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    CAIRO (AP) — Lynne O'Donnell, a foreign correspondent who has covered major stories throughout the Middle East and Asia for two decades, has been named Kabul bureau chief for The Associated Press, leading the agency's coverage of Afghanistan at a time of transition and turmoil. The appointment was announced on Tuesday by Ian Phillips, AP's Middle East news director, and Dan Perry, the regional editor for text. O'Donnell succeeds Patrick Quinn, who is now based in Cairo as a supervisor and planner for the Middle East regional editing desk. She will be the senior reporter and will lead a team of reporters, photographers, video journalists and support staff covering Afghanistan.

  • 1 Polish soldier killed, 2 wounded in Afghanistan

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    WARSAW, Poland (AP) — One Polish soldier was killed and two others wounded Tuesday in a suicide bomb attack in the Afghan capital, a military spokesman said. Spokesman Lt. Col. Piotr Walatek said Sgt. Rafal Celebudzki was killed early Tuesday on a street in Kabul when a suicide attacker exploded a bomb near a passing coalition military convoy. Celebudzki, 38, was driving one of the vehicles. He had previously served in Iraq. Walatek also said the other two soldiers' wounds were not life-threatening. Celebudzki is the 44th Polish soldier killed in Afghanistan.

  • China rig finds gas after Vietnam sea standoff

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    BEIJING (AP) — The Chinese exploration rig at the center of a tense maritime standoff with Vietnam earlier this year has made its first deep sea gas discovery in the politically volatile South China Sea, state media announced Tuesday. The discovery by China National Offshore Oil Corp. was made about a month after its rig withdrew in July from Vietnam's exclusive economic zone to far less-contested waters closer to China. The find by CNOOC's two-year-old, $1 billion deep sea rig is about 150 kilometers south of China's southernmost island of Hainan. It's unclear whether the discovery will become commercially viable, but the announcement represents a significant step in China's ability to seek resources beneath the South Chin

  • Japan's Mitsubishi to build new plant in Indonesia

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    JAKARTA, Indonesia (AP) — Mitsubishi Motors Corp. says it will build a new car factory in Indonesia as part of its plan to raise production capacity in Indonesia from 160,000 to 240,000 vehicles per year. Chief Executive Osamu Masuko said Tuesday the Japanese automaker will invest $600 million in the assembly plant. Construction is expected to begin in May next year in Bekasi, a West Java town just east of the capital Jakarta. Masuko said the plant would begin production of multi-purpose vehicles in 2017. The vehicles are also known as people carriers because they comfortably transport more people than regular cars. The Association of Indonesian Automotive Manufacturers expects Indonesia's car sales to increase

  • Militants attack Pakistani post near Afghan border

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    ISLAMABAD (AP) — Pakistan's army says a group of militants have attacked one of its positions from neighboring Afghanistan, sparking a shootout that left 11 insurgents and three soldiers killed. In a statement, the military says "a group of terrorists" from Afghanistan the Pakistani post in the North Waziristan tribal region on Tuesday. The military has been carrying out a major offensive in the area against local and foreign militants since June 15. It says Pakistan security forces repulsed the attack and captured one of the militants. Pakistan and Afghanistan share a volatile and porous border that is often the scene of cross-border attacks. Militants from both countries also cross to sue the neighboring country's s

  • A look at Myanmar's struggling clay pot industry

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    TWANTE, Myanmar (AP) — For generations, the Myanmar town of Twante has been known for its thriving pottery industry. Even today, residents can be seen sitting on wooden stools beneath the thatched roofs of their homes, placing lumps of soft clay onto wheels and shaping it with the gentle press of their fingertips into pots for cooking, storing water, preserving fish or flowers. But the opening up of this once-isolated Southeast Asian of 50 million in 2011, when ruling generals handed over power to a nominally civilian government, has affected traditional ways. Modernization and the reluctance of the younger generation to learn the art of pottery, compounded by the cost of transporting the bulky and fragile products, have turned i

  • Eminem publishers sue New Zealand political party

    Updated: Tue, Sep 16, 2014

    WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) — The music publishers for American rapper Eminem filed a lawsuit Tuesday against New Zealand's ruling political party over the music it used in a campaign commercial. Detroit-based Eight Mile Style and Martin Affiliated both claim the National Party breached copyright laws by using Eminem's song "Lose Yourself." Joel Martin, a spokesman for the two companies, said they filed a case in the New Zealand High Court and are seeking damages. "It is both disappointing and sadly ironic that the political party responsible for championing the rights of music publishers in New Zealand ... should itself have so little regard for copyright," Martin said. "We do not hesitate to take immediate action to prot