• OSU-IT's energy technology unit relaunches with new school

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    OKMULGEE — Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology has reorganized several energy programs into a new School of Energy Technologies, the university said Thursday. Three existing programs at the university — Power Plant Technologies, Pipeline Integrity Technology and Natural Gas Compression — will be part of the new school. "Energy is such a big part of Oklahoma's economy, but it's also integral to the region in states such as Texas, New Mexico, Arkansas, Kansas and Louisiana," said Roy Achemire, the new dean of the School of Energy Technologies. "Having these programs under one umbrella gives our advisers and industry partners one place they can go to meet their needs.

  • The Internet Is Now Officially Too Big as IP Addresses Run Out

    Published: Fri, Jul 3, 2015

    The Internet as we know it is now officially too big for its britches, NBC News reports. The organization that assigns IP addresses in North America — the numbers that identify every computer, smartphone and device connected to the Internet — ran out of numbers overnight Wednesday. It's not the end of the world, because there's a newer, more robust system rolling out, but it's a milestone in our shared online history, nonetheless.

  • Five El Paso teens aim to race in national solar car competition

    Updated: 12 hr ago

    Five El Paso teenagers are building a solar-powered car they hope to race in a national competition later this month — if they get the parts and funding they need. The teens are believed to be the first from El Paso to compete in the national Solar Car Challenge for high school students, although a group from Juárez competed a decade ago. With two weeks to go until they head to the competition at the Texas Motor Speedway in Fort Worth, the teens are racing to finish their car and prove to their city — and themselves — that they can do it. "Your first year, it's proving ourselves and what we're capable of," said team member Javier Lopez, 17.

  • Knob Noster school district hires assistant superintendent

    Updated: 12 hr ago

    Knob Noster – The school district hires Jerrod Wheeler to assume duties of the assistant superintendent position beginning July 1. Wheeler joins the Knob Noster School District with 14 years of administrative experience. Wheeler’s experience includes...three years as a teacher in Louisiana, one year as an elementary principal in the Chadwick School District, Chadwick; five years as an elementary principal at Nixa School District, Nixa; three years as superintendent at Sherwood School District, Creighton; and two years as superintendent at West Platte School District, Weston. Wheeler said he looks forward to joining a school district that has a good educational reputation.

  • San Angelo names new city engineer

    Updated: 13 hr ago

    SAN ANGELO, Texas - The city of San Angelo has named Russell Pehl its new city engineer. Pehl, who most recently was assistant director of water utilities with the city, succeeds Karl Bednarz, who left the city for a private engineering firm in April, according to a city news release. “I’m eager to get back to working on projects that will greatly impact San Angelo’s infrastructure, particularly improvements to streets and our water system,” Pehl said in the release. “With the city’s heightened emphasis on those and other infrastructure priorities, it’s an exciting and challenging time to serve as city engineer.

  • MSSU offers summer seminars and courses for businesses

    Yesterday

    The Small Business and Technology Development Centers at Missouri Southern State University in Joplin and Missouri State University in Springfield are offering a number of courses and seminars this summer for businesses. For additional details, or to register at MSSU, contact them at 417-625-3128 or at www.mssutraining.com. For additional details or to register at MSU, contact them at 417-837-2617 or at sbtdc.missouristate.edu. Here is a list of upcoming events: • Building the Ultimate Business Plan, 6 to 9 p.m. Wednesday and Thursday, July 8 and 9, at the MSU center at 405 N. Jefferson Ave. The course will be repeated Aug. 5-6.

  • Google driverless cars in accidents again, humans at fault — again

    Published: Thu, Jul 2, 2015

    Google's autonomous cars were once again involved in accidents while out mapping the streets of Mountain View, Calif. But in both instances, as with the dozen or so previous incidents over years of testing, humans in other vehicles were at fault, according to Google. USA TODAY reports the search company released its latest autonomous-car monthly report Wednesday, detailing two accidents in which drivers rear-ended their driverless tech-equipped Lexus SUVs while stopped at a red light.

  • Chicago extends taxing power to online movies, music, more

    Published: Thu, Jul 2, 2015

    Chicagoans who pay to stream movies and music from services like Netflix and Spotify will now need to fork over an additional 9 percent for the privilege, as will Chicago businesses that pay to use everything from real estate to court databases online, under a decision the city quietly made recently to expand its taxing power. The added costs are the result of a ruling by the city Finance Department that extends the reach of ordinances governing two types of taxes — the city amusement tax and the city personal property lease transaction tax — to cover many products streamed to businesses and residents alike.

  • One of the Most Important Tools in Science Now Fits Inside Your Phone

    Published: Thu, Jul 2, 2015

    We use them to spy on exoplanets, diagnose skin-cancer, and ID the makeup of unknown chemicals. They're on NASA spacecraft flying around Saturn's moons right now. Yes, right alongside the microscope, the optical spectrometer—an instrument that breaks down the light that something reflects or emits, telling you what its made of—is one of the most ubiquitous tools in all of science. Today, Jie Bao, a physicist at Tsinghua University in Beijing, China, has just discovered a fascinating way to make them smaller, lighter, and less expensive than we ever thought possible. By using tiny amounts of strange, light-sensitive inks, Bao and his colleague Moungi Bawendi—a chemist at MIT—have designed a working spectrometer that's small enough to fit on your smartphone. Because of the tool's simple design and its need for only an incredibly small amount of the inks, Bao says, his spectrometer only requires a few dollars worth of materials to make. They report the research today in the journal Nature.

  • Virtual reality system is beginning to catch on in sports

    Yesterday

    A former Stanford kicker has finally developed something Dallas Cowboys coach Jason Garrett has envisioned for the last 25 years — a virtual reality system that simulates practice looks and opposing team defenses. The ex-kicker, Derek Belch, along with his mentor, Stanford professor Jeremy Bailenson, have spent the past several years perfecting the system and it is beginning to catch on. Stanford, understandably, became the first school to test it and had great success with it a year ago, seeing quarterback Kevin Hogan increase his completion percentage. Other major colleges, such as the Arkansas Razorbacks, have bought in, and the Cowboys became the first NFL team to sign on the dotted line with STRIVR Labs for the t

  • Women need latest technology for prevention of breast cancer

    Updated: Wed, Jul 1, 2015

    With an identical twin who’s been married 30 years to a great guy and successful entrepreneur with lovely homes near Boston, on Cape Cod, in San Diego and Fort Myers, Fla., I often joke that I now get the commandment “Thou shall not covet.” But I’m not kidding when I say I plan to fight for one advantage enjoyed by my sister, to which I believe all of us Oklahoma women — happily married, cash-strapped or otherwise — are entitled. That’s 3-D mammography, or digital breast tomosynthesis, which is the very latest technology in the detection of breast cancer. At my recent annual breast screening, I agreed to pay an additional $53 out of pocket to have a 3-D vs. 2-D mammogram because my insurance company doesn’t ye

  • Electric vehicle startup Orange EV gets its first orders

    Updated: Wed, Jul 1, 2015

    Orange EV, a startup company making heavy-duty electric vehicles, says it is filling its first orders — for manufacturing and distribution facilities in Chicago. The financial terms and customer identities were not disclosed, though the buyers might make announcements after the vehicles have been in service awhile. Orange EV, which has focused on retrofitting terminal trucks with its electric motors, said the orders were an important step after announcing in April that its vehicles were commercially available. Orange EV, headquartered in Riverside, has focused on retrofitting its electric motors into terminal trucks, which pull loads of freight around such places as railroad yards and distribution centers.

  • BRIEF: Weld County Sheriff's Office launches mobile app

    Updated: Wed, Jul 1, 2015

    The Weld County Sheriff’s Office has launched a mobile app that allows residents to send tips or other information to law enforcement from their mobile device, Sheriff Steve Reams announced in a news release Wednesday. The free MyPD application allows residents to download an app for their iPhone or Android and connect with the sheriff’s office. They can send in tips about crimes or other quality of life issues. They also can attach a picture to the tip anonymously or with their information. “Members of the public can receive important updates from the Sheriff’s Office as push notifications” Reams said in the release. He encouraged users to opt in to messages if they want to be informed quickly of the new updates or

  • Movie review: 'Terminator: Genisys'

    Updated: Wed, Jul 1, 2015

    If you’re going to have to travel back to the past, not so much because robots demand it be reset, but rather because box office receipts require it, you might as well have some fun with it while you’re there. As the fifth installment in a seemingly tapped-out series, “Terminator: Genisys” tries to remake the past by remaking it then gleefully tearing it apart. Think a less-thoughtful, more meat-headed approach to J.J. Abrams’ first “Star Trek” reboot. While the first two “Terminator” films set the bar for sci-fi action films, they placed it so high that no future installments could touch them.

  • Drone class lets students take training to the sky

    Updated: Wed, Jul 1, 2015

    Students can train to take to the sky this fall at Hillyard Technical Center in St. Joseph. Hillyard began a program last year to teach students about unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) and unmanned aerial systems (UASs) — commonly known as drones. The St. Joseph School District now seeks a second instructor to expand the program to more students in the upcoming school year. Rick Sharp, electronics technology instructor at Hillyard, currently teaches the class. While the course focuses on hobbyists, Mr. Sharp said numerous practical applications are emerging for drone technology. For example, farmers and ranchers use drones as tools to scout their land, while emergency responders can use drones for search-and-rescu

  • California slips back to No. 8 economy in world

    Updated: Wed, Jul 1, 2015

    SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — Less than a month after edging out Brazil, California has slipped back to its ranking as the eighth-largest economy in the world based off an update of global economic data released Wednesday. According to the World Bank, Brazil's gross domestic product now stands at more than $2.3 trillion, running slightly higher than California's. The state's output was pegged at $2.3 trillion by the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis last month. That pulls California's unofficial economic ranking down from seventh place in June. California bottomed out at ninth in 2010 after a harsh drop in economic output following the 2008 financial crisis. It last claimed the No. 6 spot in 2002.

  • 5 Social Media Habits to Avoid

    Siali Siaosi, NewsOK Digital Desk dsiaosi@opubco.com | Updated: Wed, Jul 1, 2015

    The five worst social media behaviors and how to avoid them, according to a Millennial.

  • OPINION: Ferguson, Mo., police military-style hardware, tactics faulted in new Justice Department report

    Updated: Wed, Jul 1, 2015

    The Justice Department has determined what many people attending protests in Ferguson, Mo., after the police shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown knew all along. The heavily armed police confronting people already upset over the slaying of the unarmed black man by a white officer caused tensions to boil into unrest and violence. The confrontational stand by law enforcement also made it more difficult for authorities to get and keep public confidence and control, The New York Times reports. The draft report was put together by the Justice Department’s community policing unit.

  • Kansas City electric-vehicle startup gets its first orders

    Updated: Wed, Jul 1, 2015

    Orange EV, a Kansas City-area startup company making heavy-duty electric vehicles, says it is filling its first orders, for manufacturing and distribution facilities in Chicago. The financial terms and customer identities were not disclosed, though the buyers might make announcements after the vehicles have been in service awhile. Orange EV, which has focused on retrofitting terminal trucks with its electric motors, said the orders were an important step after announcing in April that its vehicles were commercially available. Orange EV, headquartered in Riverside, has focused on retrofitting its electric motors into terminal trucks, which pull loads of freight around such places as railroad yards and distribution center

  • Victoria County issues 5 same-sex marriage licenses

    Updated: Wed, Jul 1, 2015

    Karla Woodward can't wait to display her marriage license in her living room. After knowing Kellie Schmittlein for 15 years, the pair applied Tuesday morning. "Oh, isn't it pretty?" Woodward said as the ornate official Texas license came off the printer in the county clerk's office. Schmittlein and Woodward were the first couple issued a license in Victoria County since same-sex marriage was legalized by a Supreme Court ruling Friday. The county clerk's office, which was waiting for updated online forms and a legal opinion from the district attorney, began issuing licenses at 10:30 a.m. "Our goal was to make it as seamlessly a transition as we can and to be able to accommodate everyone," said County Clerk Heidi Ea




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