• APTOPIX Japan North Korea Rocket Launch

    Updated: Sun, Feb 7, 2016

    A girl watches a TV screen as all TV screens at an electronics store in Tokyo show a news program on North Korea's rocket launch with an image of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016. North Korea on Sunday defied international warnings and launched a long-range rocket that the United Nations and others call a cover for a banned test of technology for a missile that could strike the U.S. mainland. Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe sharply criticized North Korea and said that the launch violated existing U.N. resolutions on Pyongyang's use of ballistic missile technology.

  • Japan North Korea Rocket Launch

    Updated: Sat, Feb 6, 2016

    Children watch TV screens reporting North Korea's rocket launch at an electronics store in Tokyo, Sunday, Feb. 7, 2016. North Korea on Sunday defied international warnings and launched a long-range rocket that the United Nations and others call a cover for a banned test of technology for a missile that could strike the U.S. mainland. Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe sharply criticized North Korea and said that the launch violated existing U.N. resolutions on Pyongyang's use of ballistic missile technology.

  • BRIEF: Local business donates materials to school robotics teams

    Updated: Sat, Feb 6, 2016

    Emerging Technology Ventures Inc. Chief Executive Officer Eugene C. "Cliff" Hudson donated labor and materials to Alamogordo High School District's Administration Building F where the First Robotics Competition (FRC) high school team and First Tech Challenge (FTC) middle school team design, build and program their robots. The FRC high school team is the ThunderDogs and the middle school FTC team is R2D2. Hudson donated and installed white boards 8 feet x 32 inches for the robot team to design on with the help of his associate, Carter Taylor. Hudson and Taylor are also volunteer mentors for the ThunderDogs high school FRC team. ——— ©2016 the Alamogordo Daily News (Alamogordo, N.M.) Visit the Alam

  • Program looks to expand, reach more in need

    Updated: Sat, Feb 6, 2016

    CARLSBAD - - The building and classrooms are small, but their purpose is something bigger than just teaching new skillsets. Since 1986, the Carlsbad Literacy Program has been providing literacy aid in the area. The program itself, is a non-profit organization that specializes in helping adults learn how to read. Many of the adults they help are learning English as a second language. Chelsea Heine took over as director of the program last July and she says she has big plans for the program. “I have huge plans, I like to dream and I like to plan ahead,” Heine said. “I would like to see us functioning with three classes every day, full classes. I would like to see the computer lab constantly running.

  • Missouri World War II vet has mustard gas exposure claims denied by VA

    Updated: Sat, Feb 6, 2016

    WASHINGTON • In the final days of World War II, an 18-year-old Army private from Missouri named Arla Wayne Harrell was sent to Camp Crowder in the southwest corner of the state, where he said he was twice exposed to mustard gas. He didn’t talk about it for years. When he finally did, he told his family that the Army warned him he’d be thrown in jail if he ever disclosed the experiments. Harrell, known as “Arlie,” has been rejected three times by the Department of Veterans Affairs for claims to help treat a lung disorder and skin cancer that his family believes are connected to that exposure. Harrell, who turns 89 next month, is in a nursing home in Macon, Mo., 180 miles northwest of St. Louis, unable to walk or talk

  • Bio-identical hormone treatment available locally

    Updated: Sat, Feb 6, 2016

    A Woodward physician announced Wednesday that his office is the first in Northwest Oklahoma to offer bio-identical hormone replacement therapy - something patients previously were forced to go to Oklahoma City to attain. According to Woodward Obstetrics and Gynecology specialist Dr. Troy Lehman, after nearly nine years of studying and investigating the effectiveness and benefits of bio-identical hormone replacement therapy, he is now poised to offer the treatment to both men and women at his Woodward office.

  • Kansas software developers set Guinness World Record with Rubik's Cube robot

    Updated: Sat, Feb 6, 2016

    Nine-tenths of a second! Blink and you missed it. That’s how fast the rapidly spinning, softly clicking black robot built by two Olathe software developers solved a scrambled Rubik’s Cube on Friday, setting a Guinness World Record. Jay Flatland and Paul Rose of Tradebot Systems high-fived as they shattered the existing machine-solving record of 2.39 seconds on their first attempt. A crowd of more than 100 onlookers erupted into cheers and applause as they saw the eye-popping time of 0.90 flicker on the computer screen. “You gotta be kidding me,” said one. “Nobody goes under one second!” Michael Furnari of the Guinness organization officially certified the record and congratulated the pair as camera shu

  • Wichita Falls residents complain of high water bills

    Updated: Sat, Feb 6, 2016

    Wichita Falls resident Richard Johnson said he could have filled four swimming pools with the amount of water the city charged him for in November. And that'd be fine, he said, if he'd actually used it. Johnson is among three residents who told the Times Record News their November water bills for October water usage were inexplicably expensive. All three remarked that the price surge coincided with the implementation a new water billing system touted by officials as a more modern approach to bill paying. According to Johnson, who lives in the 5000 block of Legacy Drive, he used four units — or 2,960 gallons — of water in September and 11 units, or 8,140 gallons, in November. But in October, he was billed for 124 units, wh

  • For Longmont's Terralux, some much-needed extra room as business booms

    Updated: Sat, Feb 6, 2016

    Longmont's Terralux will show off its recently expanded operations during an upcoming open house, but the company's most impressive offerings aren't warehouse space and engineering labs — they are numbers. Terralux has seen a 70 percent compounded annual growth rate over the past three years and could bring in more than $20 million in 2016. Its retrofit business, which became the company's major focus in 2012, has grown by 200 percent. "It's ripping along," said CEO Steve Hane, who shared the figures. (Terralux, as a private company, does not disclose precise financials.) The company last year took over a neighboring vacant space at 1830 Lefthand Circle, adding 7,500 square feet of space for engineering, research and

  • BRIEF: NMGI is recognized as a top service provider

    Updated: Sat, Feb 6, 2016

    Network Management Group Inc. (NMGI), a Hutchinson-based company, was named one of North America’s Top 200 Managed Service Providers for 2015. The MSP mentor 200 is annually identified by Penton Technology and is a distinguished report identifying North America’s top 200 managed service providers. The award recognizes the top 5 percent of MSP firms that provide a variety of computer networking and Information Technology consulting services. For more than 30 years, NMGI has provided consulting, technology solutions, systems and related services to the public and private businesses sectors throughout the United States. NMGI has gained national exposure over the past three decades through the efforts of owner and co-fo

  • Letter: Support the proposal

    Updated: Sat, Feb 6, 2016

    As the Garfield County juvenile officers, we assist the Enid Public Schools in many different capacities including truancy issues. It is my professional opinion and belief that keeping children in school, while inspiring their love to learn, is one of the key components to a successful educational experience. As we know, completion in the education of children ultimately produces amenable young adults. One thing all children do have in common is their amazing technological skills. Most children we deal with are intrigued with being more and more “cell phone and social media savvy.” On a personal note, I am in awe of my grandchildren and their mastery of technology. Even my youngest grandson can navigate my smartphone to e

  • Students compete through technologies that enhance vision

    Updated: Sat, Feb 6, 2016

    Kale Curtis used his cane to help him maneuver down the halls of the Region III Education Service Center. Kale, a 7-year-old student from Shiner Elementary School, was at the center with 19 other students as part of the center's third annual Technology Olympics for visually impaired students. "It's been awesome," Kale said. "My favorite part was the scavenger hunt." Brenda O'Bannion, director of student support at the education center, said students competed against each other by using Braille, magnifiers, keyboards and other devices. Kale was participating in the scavenger hunt, which challenges students to use their mobility training to collect tokens scattered throughout the building for a prize. At the e

  • Watch out for phone scammers and ransomware

    Updated: Sat, Feb 6, 2016

    Most of the topics of these columns are brought to my attention through email or conversations with friends or co-workers. This week I’ve noticed a trend. People have been telling me stories about someone they know who was scammed online. These are not stupid people. They just don’t look at certain situations with their guard up. Microsoft offers of help A relative relayed a story of a close friend whose computer displayed a pop-up message, complete with beeping, saying the computer was infected and to call Microsoft at a certain number to get things fixed. This person ended up calling the number and eventually giving over debit card information for “protection.

  • Olathe software developers set Guinness World Record with Rubik's Cube robot

    Updated: Sat, Feb 6, 2016

    Nine-tenths of a second! Blink and you missed it. That’s how fast the rapidly spinning, softly clicking black robot built by two Olathe software developers solved a scrambled Rubik’s Cube on Friday, setting a Guinness World Record. Jay Flatland and Paul Rose of Tradebot Systems high-fived as they shattered the existing machine-solving record of 2.39 seconds on their first attempt. A crowd of more than 100 onlookers erupted into cheers and applause as they saw the eye-popping time of 0.90 flicker on the computer screen. “You gotta be kidding me,” said one. “Nobody goes under one second!” Robot sets Guinness World Record solving Rubik’s Cube: .

  • On Tuesday's ballot in Oklahoma

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    Oklahoma County City of Midwest City Mayor (unexpired term) Mark DeShazo Matthew D. Bukes Charles Thompson Jay Dee Collins Ward 2 council member Rick Rice Pat Byrne Ward 4 council member (unexpired term) M. Sean Reed Edward Graham Karl Willett Francis Tuttle Technology Center Board of Education Office 1 Al Smith Kurt K. Loeffelholz Metro Technology Center Board of Education Office 4 Matt Latham E. Elaine Schuster Oklahoma City Public Schools Board of Education Office 3 Adam Zodrow Carrie Coppernoll Jacobs Oakdale Public Schools Board of Education Office 3 Pam Dunlap

  • Austin software maker SolarWinds completes $4.5 billion sale

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    On Friday morning Austin software maker SolarWinds Inc. quietly completed its $4.5 billion sale to two investment firms. Jason Ream, Solarwinds’ chief financial officer, said the day was business as usual for the 17-year-old company, with only an internal email announcement sent out notifiying employees the deal had closed. In October, Silver Lake Partners and Thoma Bravo announced plans to take SolarWinds private. The offer was to pay shareholders $60.10 for each share of SolarWinds’ stock — a nearly 20 percent premium from where the stock was trading prior to the deal being announced. SolarWinds shareholders voted in January to approve the sale.

  • STIR standing against passage of SQ 777

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    Though the vote is nine months away, opponents of State Question 777 are organizing to rally against the measure, and among those detractors are members of Save the Illinois River Inc. SQ 777 is known as “Right to Farm.” First introduced by Rep. Scott Biggs, R-Chickasha, it is scheduled to appear on the Nov. 8, 2016, state ballot for consideration by the voters. It would add language to the Oklahoma Constitution reading: “The Legislature shall pass no law that abridges the right of farmers and ranchers to employ agricultural technology and livestock production and ranching practices without a compelling state interest.

  • BRIEF: Police seek ATM hackers

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    Surveillance images show two men Corpus Christi police believe tried to hack people's bank accounts. Police are asking for help identifying the men they say put a camera and a device designed to clone card information on an ATM at a bank in 6200 block of South Staples Street. Bank employees discovered the device after a customer's card got stuck Thursday. The dock broke when the customer yanked the card. Employees also found a camera that could have been used to record people entering their bank PIN numbers. Security camera footage shows the men installing the device about 7:30 p.m. Wednesday. The police department's financial crimes unit has seen an uptick in reports of hacked bank accounts during the past 10 mon

  • Texoma Cattlemen's Conference to highlight innovation, technology

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    ARDMORE — The U.S. beef cattle industry leads the world’s cattle producers in adoption of science and technology innovations, but the ever-changing landscape requires constant education. To support producer education, the Samuel Roberts Noble Foundation will host its fifth annual Texoma Cattlemen’s Conference, one of the premier beef conferences in the southern Great Plains. Titled “The Cattle Industry: Evolving through Innovation and Technology,” the conference will take place from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., Friday, Feb. 26, at the Ardmore Convention Center. This year’s conference will showcase the impact technologies have had on the beef industry and the emerging technologies that could prove valuable to cattlemen.

  • Grayson College teaches Van Alstyne middle schoolers about local careers, classes

    Updated: Fri, Feb 5, 2016

    VAN ALSTYNE — As part of Van Alstyne Middle School’s exploring careers class, eighth graders were introduced to a variety of professions and dual-credit classes at Grayson College South Campus Thursday morning. The group of 20 students learned about health science, welding and core classes so they know what to take when they get to high school. “I wanted to expose them to a variety of education options after high school and the programs that Grayson College has because I believe some of our kids can benefit from welding and (medical technology) lab,” VAMS eighth grade teacher Taylor Penn said. In the medical technology lab, students were challenged to see how well they could wash their hands.




Advertisement