• Oklahoma City-area achievers

    Updated: Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    Engineer for a Day gives high school students the opportunity to see what a career in engineering might look like. Students learn about the possibilities that are available to them while shadowing a professional engineer. Bradon McGill, a Yukon High School junior, spent the day shadowing at CEC Infrastructure Solutions in Oklahoma City. “Spending the day at CEC was great,” McGill said. “I had planned on getting into aerospace engineering, but after seeing all the cool stuff they do at CEC, I’ve switched to wanting to do structural engineering.” This year’s participants from Canadian Valley Technology Center were: McGill, Aramis Jones (Yukon senior), Andrew Patterson (homeschool senior), Braden Zimmerman (Yuk

  • Dallas ISD trustees to consider $134.7 million improvements plan

    Updated: Thu, Mar 26, 2015

    A $134.7 million proposal being considered by Dallas ISD trustees Thursday would fast-track improvements at schools while creating more prekindergarten classrooms and reopening several campuses. School districts typically handle such big-ticket packages through bond programs approved by voters. The “interim bridge plan” proposed by DISD administrators would be paid for with 2008 bond funds, limited-maintenance tax notes and money from the reserve fund. “We wanted to address the most urgent needs right now,” said Mike Koprowski, DISD’s chief of transformation and innovation. District administrators say the plan, which calls for setting aside an additional $13 million for unforeseeable costs, can quickly address

  • Act on this retired FBI agent's cybersecurity advice

    Updated: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    Hackers like soft targets. And that’s just what you are if you don’t routinely download updates to the operating systems on your phone or computer. You’re soft if you visit your bank’s website through a web browser. And browsing with Internet Explorer when you do go online means you’re a soft target. Being soft doesn’t mean you’ll get attacked by hackers more than the next cyber citizen. Most everyone gets hit eventually. “It doesn’t mean it has to be a successful attack,” said Jeff Lanza, a former FBI special agent who is now focused on cybersecurity for businesses and individuals. Technology and smart habits can turn anyone into a hard target, and that means unsuccessful attacks and security.

  • A big deal backing Orange EV, a Kansas City area electric truck company

    Updated: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    Orange EV, an electric-truck startup company in search of customers, has found what could be the perfect partner, Kalmar Ottawa. Orange, headquartered in Riverside, has focused on retrofitting terminal tractors, which pull loads of freight around such places as railroad yards and distribution centers, with its electric motors. And now it has a deal to work with Kalmar Ottawa, an Ottawa, Kan., manufacturer known as the inventor of the terminal tractor in 1958 and its chief seller. Kalmar’s dealer network for terminal tractors has 171 locations in North America. The companies, in a joint release, said a Kalmar T-Series terminal tractor retrofitted by Orange “is the first and only one to match the power and reliability

  • Inventor hopes gadget saves farmers valuable time in the field

    Updated: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    Ethan Eck remembers dumping agricultural chemicals into a farm sprayer as being kind of a pain in the rear. If you’re doing it a few dozen times a day, and you’re supposed to rinse out and dispose of the jugs, too — and an expensive machine sits idling for the minutes it takes to complete those chores — then it’s more than an inconvenience. It’s an entrepreneurial opportunity. That’s certainly what Eck and partner Ralph Lagergren hope. Eck, age 23, is the inventor of the Chem-blade, a stainless steel gadget with blades that fits inside the plastic induction tank used to mix expensive farm chemicals such as pesticides and herbicides for farm sprayers. A farmer jams a plastic 2.

  • Alerts critical to storm safety

    Updated: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    MIAMI — With tornado season underway, it is critical to have alerts for approaching inclement weather. A number of applications are available for cell phone users who can receive text messages. The applications are usually free to the public and can help save a life. “On your phone, you can get weather alerts for free,” Miami Director of Emergency Management Glenda Longan said. “The American Red Cross has a free tornado app. Intellicast is also a good app to have for radar.” American Red Cross has a free tornado smart phone application developed for Android and iPhone users. The app will notify the user of any tornado watches or warnings as well as severe weather in your area. It offers tornado preparation tips, qui

  • Fannin County residents voice concerns about proposed reservoir

    Updated: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    BONHAM — About 80 Fannin County residents gathered to comment on the Lower Bois d’Arc Creek Reservoir Tuesday evening at the Fannin County Multi-Purpose Complex in Bonham. Some were supportive of the project, but many residents present to make comments were not. Present at the meeting were representatives from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, the North Texas Municipal Water District and design and engineering Freese and Nichols. The Lower Bois d’Arc Creek Reservoir is a proposed dam and water supply reservoir that would be located on Bois d’Arc Creek about 15 miles northeast of Bonham, said Andrew Commer, chief of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Tulsa Regulatory Office.

  • National Geographic explorer to present program on use of technology in archaeology

    Updated: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    PITTSBURG, Kan. — A National Geographic emerging explorer, research scientist and engineer will take the stage at 7:30 p.m. Friday, March 27, at the Bicknell Family Center for the Arts on the campus of Pittsburg State University. He will present a program that focuses on his use of emerging technologies to search for one of archaeology’s Holy Grails: The long-lost tomb of conqueror Genghis Khan. Because tradition forbids opening Genghis Khan’s tomb, Albert Yu-Min Lin devised non-invasive methods for investigating possible sites. More than 28,000 people around the world accepted his invitation to join in the search by examining satellite images for signs of ancient structures. Then Lin and his team saddled up — literal

  • Tri County Tech robotics team prepares for competition

    Updated: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    Tri County Tech’s FIRST robotics team is gearing up for the Oklahoma Regional robotics competition this weekend in Oklahoma City. The team of 13 high school students and nine adult mentors will be competing against 61 other teams from across the region March 26-28 at the Cox Business Center in downtown Oklahoma City. The Oklahoma Regional was first held in 2007 at the venue, and Tri County Tech has several championships and awards from the competition. FIRST, which is an acronym “For Inspiration and Recognition of Science and Technology,” was founded in 1989 by entrepreneur Dean Kaman to help young people discover the excitement and rewards of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) education. Kaman is best-kno

  • A big deal backing Orange, a Kansas City area electric truck company

    Updated: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    Orange EV, an electric-truck startup company in search of customers, has found what could be the perfect partner, Kalmar Ottawa. Orange, headquartered in Riverside, has focused on retrofitting terminal tractors, which pull loads of freight around such places as railroad yards and distribution centers, with its electric motors. And now it has a deal to work with Kalmar Ottawa, an Ottawa, Kan., manufacturer known as the inventor of the terminal tractor in 1958 and its chief seller. Kalmar’s dealer network for terminal tractors has 171 locations in North America. The companies, in a joint release, said a Kalmar T-Series terminal tractor retrofitted by Orange “is the first and only one to match the power and reliability

  • Facebook Accidentally Leaked A Lot of Its Big F8 Announcements

    Published: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    Someone in the Facebook headquarters has slippery fingers. Early Wednesday morning, the company sent out a push alert through its F8 conference app that mistakenly leaked some of the event’s major announcements, Yahoo Tech reports. The message revealed Facebook’s plans to integrate with Internet-connected home devices and make its Messenger app a platform. It also referenced a mystery product called “Teleportation Station,” according to screenshots published by TechCrunch.

  • Arnold named to Forty Under 40 List

    Updated: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    SIDNEY — A Freshway Foods employee has been honored by the Dayton Business Journal. Tony Arnold, the company's director of Human Resources, has been named to the Dayton Business Journal's Forty Under 40 list. The list honors the brightest young professionals in the region, and honorees were chosen from nearly 270 nominations. Company President and COO Devon Beer was not surprised to hear that Arnold was chosen for this prestigious list. “Anyone who has worked with Tony knows how deserving he is of this award,” said Beer. “Tony is the consummate team player and a pleasure to be around,” he added. “The Freshway team could not be more proud of him. The sky is the limit regarding his future.

  • Energy summit set Monday

    Updated: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    Tickets are still available for the 2015 Tyler Area Energy Summit, scheduled for 11 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. on Monday at the Ornelas Activity Center at the University of Texas at Tyler. Individual tickets are $25, and $200 for an eight-person table. Tickets can be obtained by calling the Tyler Area Chamber of Commerce, at 903-592-1661. Guest speakers include some heavy-hitters in the energy industry. Paul Tanaka, Ph.D., is an energy and technology advisor for ExxonMobil. He's part of the Corporate Strategic Planning Department, where he studies energy trends, emerging technologies and policy issues. Bernard Weinstein, Ph.D., is an economist and associate director of Southern Methodist University's Maguire Energy Institu

  • Review: Sony streaming service modernizes TV, not your bill

    Updated: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — Sony's new PlayStation Vue television service probably won't save you money over cable. Starting at $50 a month, Vue offers more than 50 over-the-air and cable channels for online streaming. But you need a PlayStation game console and you still need Internet access — likely from the same cable company you're trying to ditch. If you press, your pay-TV company might offer a slimmed-down TV package that's comparable to Sony's in price and lineup. Instead of a lower bill, what you get is an attempt to modernize how we watch TV: ___ CHANNEL LINEUP The service currently is limited to New York, Chicago and Philadelphia. More cities are coming later this year.

  • A 'Post Modern Skateboard' That Ditches The Board

    Updated: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    It has been a while since we've seen an upgrade to either roller skates or the skateboard, says NPR. But which one is it? These wheels give skating in the 21st century an effortless new look.

  • Dallas audit finds loose cash controls for building permit fees

    Updated: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    Cash handed over to the city of Dallas in building permit fees is not well controlled and may be vulnerable to theft, City Auditor Craig Kinton has found. An audit report from Kinton to the Dallas City Council gives no indication of whether money is believed to be missing from the Department of Sustainable Development and Construction, which collects about $26.8 million a year in commercial and residential building fees. But it said the department’s internal controls are lacking, suggesting, at least, that the system is vulnerable to abuse. Among other shortcomings, Kinton found that the building department does a poor job of tracking who has access to the software that the city uses to manage cash collections.

  • Details on PlayStation Vue, comparison with Sling TV

    Updated: Wed, Mar 25, 2015

    NEW YORK (AP) — Sony's new PlayStation Vue online TV service launched in three cities last week with more than 50 channels starting at $50. Additional channels can be had for $10 to $20 more, and the service comes with some on-demand apps for remote viewings. Here's a look at the packages and how they compare with Dish's $20-a-month Sling TV offering. Neither requires any long-term commitment. ___ PLAYSTATION VUE: — AVAILABILITY: Only in New York, Chicago and Philadelphia, excluding their suburbs. Three people can watch programs simultaneously — if each has a separate PlayStation 3 or 4 (only one can be a PS4). Works only in the home. An iPad app is coming, though there will be restrictions on shows av

  • Cyber Safety: Cunningham crafts comics for kids

    Updated: Tue, Mar 24, 2015

    Superman, Batman, Spiderman — all superheroes from DC or Marvel Comics. Who isn’t familiar with those? “The Cynja” is a relatively new comic book superhero — a Cyber Ninja — created to teach computer safety on a level kids can understand. Chase Cunningham, who graduated from Blooming Grove High School in 1998, and his partner created the series of comic books, which are gaining momentum in popularity. What: Chase Cunningham to speak at Storytime Where: Corsicana Public Library When: Wednesday, March 25 What time: 10 a.m. “The whole premise for the comic book originated with me working for the United States Navy for a while,” Cunningham said. “My partner Heather and I started talking a

  • Airbus announces move to Wichita State's Innovation Campus

    Updated: Tue, Mar 24, 2015

    Airbus Americas, one of Wichita’s airplane manufacturing companies, announced that it is moving 400 employees and its Wichita engineering center from Old Town to a building soon to be built on the Wichita State University campus, WSU and company officials said Tuesday. The move was previously reported last week by The Eagle and Kansas.com. University leaders were euphoric about the announcement and about how the week started, with a historic men’s basketball win over the University of Kansas on Sunday. As big as that was, this announcement was bigger — bigger than even having multiple national basketball championships, President John Bardo said. One basketball game makes people happy, WSU vice president John Tombl

  • Commissioners hear more about Citizens Medical Center controversy

    Updated: Tue, Mar 24, 2015

    A former Citizens Medical Center employee took his complaint about hospital equipment maintenance to the county commissioners Monday. Rudolph De Los Santos said he is worried outsourcing servicing the hospital's medical equipment to General Electric compromised the hospital's quality of care. GE thinks it has lessened the workload, but that's only because it is not performing preventive maintenance checks as often as when the work was done in house, he said. But CEO Stephen Thames said GE has been able to keep up with the preventive maintenance checks while saving the county money. Doctors recently gave Thames a vote of no confidence. The hospital's board met for five hours in closed session last week but did not




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