• St. Vrain prepares for first U.S. NAO high school robotics challenge

    Updated: Sun, Jun 21, 2015

    St. Vrain Valley students are learning to program humanoid robots for the country's first NAO high school robotics challenge. The goal of the challenge, which will be June 27 at the Longmont Museum and co-hosted by the district, is simple: Get students excited about math, science, programming and technology. Logan Stype, an incoming sophomore at Skyline High, said he jumped at the chance to participate in the competition. "You get to play with a robot and make it do some cool things," he said. "It gives you insight into what's possible." The competition was created by French company Aldebaran Robotics, which makes the NAO robots and opened a U.S. branch several years ago.

  • Technology poses difficult challenges for teens, parents

    Updated: Sun, Jun 21, 2015

    With the popularity of smart phones and camera phones, it is very easy to send and receive pictures. This is a great thing when it used properly, such as vacations, family events or little league, but it also can be a bad thing. We are starting to see more and more sexting among teenagers and this has become an increasing concern for the parents of teenagers and preteens. Sexting refers to sharing nude or near nude pictures, usually via a mobile phone. Most experts distinguish between sending naked photos, an activity with serious privacy, health and legal implications, and simply sending suggestive text messages, which is less harmful. Where teens fall short is in their understanding of the legal ramifications of sexting.

  • Disaster! Who you gonna call?

    Updated: Sun, Jun 21, 2015

    If you ever wonder how help will get to you if a natural disaster wipes out your phone and computer service, you can find the answer next weekend when ham radio operators converge in Canon City and Pueblo West. Ham radio operators will host a field event to showcase the science, skill and service of amateur radio, plus get in some good practice for potential disasters during Amateur Radio Field Day. The event will incorporate members of the Royal Gorge Amateur Radio Club working at the Holy Cross Abbey, 2951 E. U.S. 50; and the Pueblo West Amateur Radio Club stationed at Lovell Park, 362 E. Hahns Peak Ave. Since 1933, ham radio operators across the country have set up temporary ham radio stations in public locations dur

  • End of the line for Rawlings' football helmets

    Updated: Sun, Jun 21, 2015

    Rawlings’ football helmets are getting sacked far short of their goal. Five years after Rawlings Sporting Goods jumped back into the football helmet business, the company is cutting short its gridiron comeback. Rawlings, a Town and Country-based maker of baseball gloves, softball bats and other sporting goods, confirmed that it is ending production of its football helmets and football shoulder pads this year. Rawlings announced the launch in 2010 and began selling football helmets in 2011. Its football helmets worn by youth, high school and professional players are made at an assembly facility in Washington, Mo., and tested at Rawlings’ research and development center in O’Fallon, Mo.

  • Analytics at heart of Cards' success, federal probe

    Updated: Sun, Jun 21, 2015

    When Cardinals chairman Bill DeWitt Jr. hired Jeff Luhnow in 2003 to guide the club into the super numbers-crunching era and tap the well of data beneath baseball’s surface, there was one figure in the statistical gusher he didn’t ask to know. The new, and at times radical, initiative did not have a fixed budget. “There was none. What we needed is what we did,” DeWitt said Friday, recalling the early days when the Cardinals first logged into the game’s sabermetric uprising. “Today every aspect of the game is under analytical scrutiny. On the field. Off the field. Medicals. … There has been a coming around to information in the last 10 to 15 years and a lot of teams were looking for that edge. I feel good that at

  • AISD's deaf education program removes obstacles for hearing-impaired students

    Updated: Sun, Jun 21, 2015

    Though he may be young, Madison Middle School student Tyler Ballard has a life ambition. Tyler is deaf. His goal is to see the end to the stigma that deaf people are different from those who can hear. “I want to prove to the world deaf and hearing are the same,” said Tyler, who will enter eighth grade in the fall. Tyler, whose family lives in Hamlin, doesn’t speak much, preferring sign language to communicate. Despite the traveling distance, he’s attending Madison Middle School because of the Abilene Independent School District’s deaf education program, which runs from elementary school at Ward Elementary, through Madison Middle and into high school at Cooper High. Tyler will enter eighth grade in

  • Is the selfie the new autograph?

    Updated: Sat, Jun 20, 2015

    Every time a fan pulls out a phone and asks Michael McKenry to pose for a selfie, it makes him laugh. It reminds the Rockies catcher of "The Goonies," where one of the young characters created a device that holds the camera out in front of him. "When you think about it, he's the one who invented the selfie stick," McKenry said of the kid in the 1985 film. "And it took all this time for technology to catch up." Technology has caught up, all right. Roughly 100 million selfies are taken daily according to a study from Google, those making up part of the nearly 900 billion photos snapped in a year according to Agence France-Presse.

  • Analytical scrutiny that fuels Cards' success also fuels federal probe

    Updated: Sat, Jun 20, 2015

    When Cardinals chairman Bill DeWitt Jr. hired Jeff Luhnow in 2003 to guide the club into the super numbers-crunching era and tap the well of data beneath baseball’s surface, there was one figure in the statistical gusher he didn’t ask to know. The new, and at times radical, initiative did not have a fixed budget. “There was none. What we needed is what we did,” DeWitt said Friday, recalling the early days when the Cardinals first logged into to the game’s sabermetric uprising. “Today every aspect of the game is under analytical scrutiny. On the field. Off the field. Medicals. … There has been a coming around to information in the last 10 to 15 years and a lot of teams were looking for that edge.

  • Toyota tests two electric vehicles in Dallas

    Updated: Sat, Jun 20, 2015

    Toyota held an event Monday at American Airlines Center for members of the press to test drive two electric vehicles, the Toyota i-Road and the Toyota Coms. What these cars lack in size, they make up for in fun. The i-Road concept, which looks like a mix between a Vespa and a Smart car (and Barbie’s dream car if you get it in pink), sits on three wheels and leans with you as you turn. It also comes in “Skittles” colors like lemon yellow and bright green. The i-Road can only go 35 mph and, I was assured before I took the wheel, it’s incapable of tipping over. The Coms looks more like a traditional electric vehicle, but it’s “ultra-compact.

  • New 3D mammography tech helps detect cancer early

    Updated: Sat, Jun 20, 2015

    When it comes to detecting breast cancer early, Bothwell Regional Health Center is trying to stay ahead of the curve with its new 3D mammography machine. BRHC obtained the new machine earlier this year and started using it with patients in mid-April. It replaces a 2D mammography machine that had simply fulfilled its 10-year lifespan, and instead of purchasing an upgraded 2D machine, BRHC officials opted for the advanced technology offered by 3D. 2D scans offer doctors four photos of the patient’s breasts, while 3D offers up to 180. “When they take the picture of the breast, what happens is this tube makes an arc over the breast,” explained Donita Shipman, radiology control technologist.

  • Amateur Radio Association to host Field Day

    Updated: Sat, Jun 20, 2015

    Members of the Altus Area Amateur Radio Association (AAARA) will be participating in the National Amateur Radio Field Day exercise, June 27 and 28, at 3111 Partridge Place. Since 1933, Amateur Radio, also known as, Ham Radio operators across North America have established temporary ham radio stations in varying locations during field day. The purpose is to showcase the science and skill of Amateur Radio. This event is open to the public and all are encouraged to attend. Amateur Radio allows people to experiment with electronics and communication techniques, as well as the ability to provide a free public service to their community in the event of a disaster. This all can be done without a cell phone or internet.

  • New top-level domains challenge businesses, offer opportunities

    BY PAULA BURKES | Updated: Fri, Jun 19, 2015

    Daily business Q&A with Drew T. Palmer

  • Federal officials in KC file charges in massive international software fraud case

    Updated: Fri, Jun 19, 2015

    Federal criminal charges filed in Kansas City allege a massive, globe-spanning conspiracy to buy and sell counterfeit computer software. Tens of millions of dollars exchanged hands in the alleged criminal enterprise, which rivals the largest previous federal investigation into software piracy, authorities say. The criminal charges against three men follow a lengthy investigation and a wave of civil filings to seize money and property from those involved. The conspiracy extended from China, where counterfeiters allegedly supplied pirated software products and stolen codes and serial numbers to activate those products to numerous individuals and companies across the United States, according to court documents filed by the

  • Urban Renewal approves deal to move Automobile Alley electrical substation

    Updated: Fri, Jun 19, 2015

    The far north wedge of the right-of-way, meanwhile, will be built as surface parking. The current substation spot is across the street from Kamps 1910 Cafe and the former home of Duncan’s Bindery that is being converted into a private residence. The substation is also across the highway from a new $125 million GE Global Research Oil & Gas Technology Center under construction at NE 10 and I-235. Cathy O’Connor, director of the Urban Renewal Authority, said the $63,000 will then be paid back to her agency by OGE Energy Corp.

  • Austin's Iconixx Software raising millions for expansion

    Updated: Fri, Jun 19, 2015

    Iconixx Software Corp has received $4.5 million and plans to close on another $5.5 million next month to expand its products, which help companies manage sales, bonus and salary compensation. As more businesses move towards performance-based pay increases, Iconixx has grown by selling software that helps companies track workers’ goals and objectives. Ballast Point Ventures of Tampa, Fla., was the investor in the $4.5 million portion of the funding, and Harbert Venture Partners of Richmond, Va., will be the investor in the $5.5 million portion, company executives said. The company previously raised $8.5 million from outside investors.

  • Slavery records will soon be easily searchable online

    Published: Fri, Jun 19, 2015

    Millions of previously hard-to-access records on freed enslaved African Americans collected just after the start of the U.S. Civil War will soon be easily searchable online, likely allowing millions of people to trace their ancestry back farther than ever before, USA TODAY reports. FamilySearch, a large genealogy organization, announced Friday that in collaboration with several other organizations it will digitally release records collected through the Freedmen's Bureau and launch a nationwide volunteer effort to make the records searchable by indexing them by 2016.

  • Google to remove 'revenge porn' from search results

    Published: Fri, Jun 19, 2015

    In a significant step to combat "revenge porn," Google will honor requests to remove from search results nude or sexually explicit images posted on the Internet without consent, USA TODAY reports. Google says it will remove the search results the same way it does other sorts of highly sensitive personal information such as bank account numbers and Social Security numbers.

  • Feds in KC file charges in massive international software fraud case

    Updated: Fri, Jun 19, 2015

    Federal criminal charges filed in Kansas City allege a massive globe-spanning conspiracy to buy and sell counterfeit computer software. Authorities allege that tens of millions of dollars exchanged hands in the alleged criminal enterprise that rivals the largest previous federal investigation into software piracy. The conspiracy extended from China where counterfeiters allegedly supplied pirated software products and stolen codes and serial numbers to activate those products to numerous individuals and companies across the United States, according to court documents filed by the U.S. attorney’s office in Kansas City.

  • Hoxie High making science strides

    Updated: Fri, Jun 19, 2015

    HOXIE — Makerspaces are popping up in libraries and classrooms throughout the country, and Hoxie High School is the most recent to get its hands on the advanced technology. A Makerspace is an area dedicated to hands-on learning that promotes networking, problem-solving and creation using the most up-to-date technology. “We have to keep up with today’s workforce,” said Hoxie High science teacher Rebecca Scheck. “It keeps moving forward, so our kids need to keep moving forward to keep up with 21st century technology.” The addition was made possible after the high school received a grant through the Dane Hansen Foundation.

  • Advanced medical alert systems now offer GPS, fall detection

    Updated: Fri, Jun 19, 2015

    The choices are numerous. Medical alert systems have advanced far beyond the basic pendants that enable a loved one to summon assistance. Today's range of products includes wristbands, watches and cellphones equipped with emergency buttons or apps. Their capabilities have also expanded to include GPS tracking and fall detection, all of which help users live more independently and keep them safe when they venture outside. That's broadened their appeal from just homebound senior citizens to younger people with physical disabilities and others worried about security. The whole category started with the Philips Lifeline pendant in 1974. It helped seniors living alone feel safe and gave their loved ones peace of mind. But it only




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