• Colorado Springs' Go Code winners move on to forming 'real business'

    Updated: 2 hr ago

    A Colorado Springs-based team of software developers hopes to complete development and launch a web application by year's end that will help match employers with potential employees. The team became the first from the Springs to win a $25,000, one-year contract with the state Thursday in Colorado's annual Go Code competition, which challenges teams to turn state data into software applications that solve business problems. The local team, called Hively, and two winning teams from Denver and Fort Collins faced off with seven other finalists from around the state.

  • Suffering in silence: Many embarrassed to talk about incontinence, but treatments exist

    Updated: 9 hr ago

    About a year ago Sharon Pikul sat on a park bench and felt like she was sitting on a water balloon. She later learned her bladder had fallen and was hanging about an inch outside of her vaginal cavity, making life rather difficult. For the past year she used a therapeutic pessary, a medical device inserted vaginally that helps with pelvic organ prolapse, and numerous Poise pads - enough that she jokingly wishes she'd bought stock. But in April, after Medicare insurance came through, she met with a urologist and received a bladder sling. "I'm a new woman," said Pikul, 65, who's birthed three babies. "I don't even need a Poise pad. I'm such a happy camper. It's a miracle especially after dealing with it for so long.

  • Incontinence affects millions, solutions exist

    Updated: 17 hr ago

    About a year ago Sharon Pikul sat on a park bench and felt like she was sitting on a water balloon. She later learned her bladder had fallen and was hanging about an inch outside of her vaginal cavity, making life rather difficult. For the past year she used a therapeutic pessary, a medical device inserted vaginally that helps with pelvic organ prolapse, and numerous Poise pads - enough that she jokingly wishes she'd bought stock. But in April, after Medicare insurance came through, she met with a urologist and received a bladder sling. "I'm a new woman," said Pikul, 65, who's birthed three babies. "I don't even need a Poise pad. I'm such a happy camper. It's a miracle especially after dealing with it for so long.

  • Making it big in self-storage

    Updated: Mon, May 30, 2016

    Every weekend on the cable television show Storage Wars, dedicated bargain hunters try to outmaneuver each other to find valuable treasures in unclaimed storage lockers. Of course, the venue is California and some of the items are truly valuable, while other storage units end up being duds. In Santa Fe, Forrest Thomas, owner of several storage locker properties, is often on the other end of those auctions. Thomas said the high-competition auctions on television are an anomaly. In New Mexico, his businesses are forced to auction perhaps five units a year. “The last thing we want to do is auction off somebody’s stuff,” he said. Still, when units are sold there might be deals since most of them sell for a few h

  • Australia Bitcoin

    Australia Bitcoin

    Updated: Mon, May 30, 2016

    In this April 7, 2014 file photo, Bitcoin logos are displayed at the Inside Bitcoins conference and trade show in New York. About $13 million in bitcoins will be auctioned in Sydney in June after Australian police confiscated the digital currency as proceeds of crime, an official said Tuesday, May 31, 2016.

  • One of fastest drone pilots in world flies at Wichita dog park

    Updated: Mon, May 30, 2016

    On May 10, Brian Morris, arguably one of the world’s fastest drone pilots, had only a few hours to prove that he was still the best. He pounded PVC-style poles into the ground at Chapin, a dog park in Wichita that has a small corner dedicated to remote-controlled planes and a new, even smaller section for drones. The measurements for his poles had to be exactly the same as every other drone pilot across the world. After he and two racing buddies built the track, he had to record his race on video and, because this was the final day and because he works an IT job from 8 to 5, lower his time before the sun set fully. Drone racing is in its infancy but is growing quickly.

  • Insider Q&A: Proofpoint's Devin Redmond

    Insider Q&A: Proofpoint\'s Devin Redmond

    Updated: Mon, May 30, 2016

    NEW YORK (AP) — The rise of social media has given brands a quick and efficient way to communicate with consumers. But hackers are using those same channels — such as popular public Facebook pages and Twitter accounts — to dupe their followers into clicking on links that spread viruses or steal login information for banking and other accounts. In addition, other people will post on brands' social media accounts and use them as sounding boards for various causes or hate speech usually unrelated to the company, which could reflect poorly on it. As a result, businesses face a never-ending task of policing their social media accounts. That's where Proofpoint comes in.

  • Food and Farm Science of Agriculture

    Food and Farm Science of Agriculture

    Updated: Mon, May 30, 2016

    In this April 23, 2016, photo, members of the Meeker County Ag Squad are seen at the University of Minnesota in St. Paul showing off the GPS ear tags they developed to help farmers track their livestock from far away. From left are: are Andrew Massmann, Jackie Massmann, Casey Gohmann, Abbey Schiefelbein, and Bailee Schiefelbein, all of Kimball, Minn. They're taking part in the 4-H Science of Agriculture Challenge, which aims to nurture the next generation of agricultural scientists for a country facing a critical shortage of them.

  • Oklahoma City schools' budget tightening means loss of federal technology funds

    Updated: Mon, May 30, 2016

    Oklahoma City Public Schools will not complete a Wi-Fi expansion for all elementary schools this year after officials said they had to turn down $4.6 million in federal technology funds because midyear budget failures left the district without enough money to contribute to the project. In addition to budget cuts, an expansion of the federal funding program to high-income schools has limited the money available for districts like Oklahoma City. The Schools and Libraries Program, commonly referred to as e-rate funds, is a federally administered funding program for technology services. The program reimburses the majority of the cost of technology upgrades in low-income schools.

  • China Fuel Cell Bus

    China Fuel Cell Bus

    Updated: Mon, May 30, 2016

    Malaysian actress and United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Global Goodwill Ambassador Michelle Yeoh, third from left waves as she attends the unveiling of a new Fuel Cell Bus at the United Nations compound in Beijing, China, Monday, May 30, 2016. The bus runs on renewable hydrogen gas and has been jointly designed by UNDP and China over the past decade as a showcase pilot project to further the commercialization of the green technology in China.

  • Take a number: Complaints about wait times at Weld Clerk and Recorder's Office continue to pile up

    Updated: Sun, May 29, 2016

    Cindi Kennedy has been farming in Weld County since 2008. Her job lands her in the Clerk and Recorder’s Office pretty often. “We have trucks and trailers and all kinds of stuff,” she said. “I’m in there at least once every other month.” In the past year and a half, she began to dread the visits. Getting a title done used to be a 20-minute errand. “For me, it’s a three-hour deal,” Kennedy said. “It’s half of my day.” Her last visit was one of the worst in recent memory. “I came back to the office three times getting stuff,” she said. Kennedy isn’t the only one complaining about wait times at the office.

  • Nebraska Capitol Focus

    Nebraska Capitol Focus

    Updated: Sun, May 29, 2016

    In this May 19, 2016 photo, Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts pumps E-85 ethanol blend fuel into a pickup truck, while visiting the Sapp Brothers Travel Center in Omaha, Neb., to promote renewable fuels month in Nebraska. Gov. Ricketts took office promising to bring his business savvy to state government and remove obstacles that make it harder for companies to flourish in Nebraska. Yet in his first two years as governor, the former corporate executive has repeatedly found himself at odds with business groups on some of their top priorities.

  • China Second Child Last Chances

    China Second Child Last Chances

    Updated: Sun, May 29, 2016

    In this Sunday, April 24, 2016 photo, Dr. Liu Jiaen, center, watches his staff member work on a laboratory dish during an infertility treatment through in vitro fertilization (IVF) for a patient at a hospital in Beijing. China’s decision to allow all married couples to have two children is driving a surge in demand for fertility treatment among older women, putting heavy pressure on clinics and breaking down past sensitivities, and even shame, about the issue. The rise in IVF points to the deferred dreams of many parents who long wanted a second child, but were prevented by a strict population control policy in place for more than 30 years.

  • 5 Questions: Retired tech exec in Lafayette coaching STEM grads on interview techniques

    Updated: Sat, May 28, 2016

    When Susan Penny Brown was embarking on her technology career in Silicon Valley, she bombed all of her interviews. "I did not have what it took to succeed in an interview," Brown said. But once she figured out where she was going wrong, she landed a job and "spent the next 30 years helping anyone who ever asked how to get a job." Brown is continuing that mission after retiring from her decades-long career as a technology executive. She recently founded her own business, Master My Interview, a career coaching and consultation service that focuses mainly on millennials in the science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields.

  • NTU student maps Four Corners oil and gas wells

    Updated: Sat, May 28, 2016

    SHIPROCK — Navajo Technical University student Jayvion Chee hopes to raise awareness of the potential environmental effects that oil and gas operations have on the Navajo Nation and San Juan County. Over the last year, Chee has developed a map of recently drilled oil and gas wells that he documented using GIT, or geographic information technology, to show their proximity to communities and major sources of water, including the San Juan River. Chee's project was funded through an internship with a South Dakota-based geospatial company, Kiksapa Consulting. Chee's work earned him recognition from his school. In March, the 21-year-old was named NTU’s Student of the Year at the American Indian College Fund’s banquet in Minne

  • Driverless Cars

    Driverless Cars

    Updated: Sat, May 28, 2016

    FILE--In this July 20, 2015 file photo, a pedestrian crosses in front of a vehicle as part of a demonstration at Mcity, used to test driverless and connected vehicles, on the University of Michigan campus in Ann Arbor, Mich. The U.S. auto industry's home state of Michigan is preparing for the advent of self-driving cars by pushing legislation to allow for public sales and operation _ a significant expansion beyond an existing law that sanctions autonomous vehicles for testing only.

  • Texas attorney general's tech project $200 million over budget

    Updated: Fri, May 27, 2016

    A decade-long, problem-plagued technology project at the Texas attorney general’s office will be $200 million over budget and two years delayed by the time it wraps up, state officials said Friday. T2 — a massive technology system upgrade intended to handle child support payments and investigations at the attorney general’s office — will ultimately cost $420 million. But officials say they finally have control over the runaway project. T2 is expected to go live Dec. 3, 2018. If the project is not completed by then, Accenture, the technology company spearheading the remaining work, will be fined $340,000 for every week it is late.

  • Cerner touts $1.2 billion in local economic impact, says it expects to employ 25,000 in area

    Updated: Fri, May 27, 2016

    Cerner Corp. executives are getting “tremendous input” from Neal Patterson the patient as well as Neal Patterson the co-founder, stockholders heard Friday morning at the Kansas City-based company’s annual meeting. Patterson missed his usual role presiding over the meeting, but co-founder Cliff Illig told those in attendance that Patterson remains involved with the senior management team and that he is providing “great insight from his experience.” Cerner revealed in January that Patterson was undergoing treatment for cancer. Cerner has an economic impact of at least $1.2 billion on the Kansas City area, executives said.

  • Fast money: Banks making it easier to split the tab

    Fast money: Banks making it easier to split the...

    Updated: Fri, May 27, 2016

    NEW YORK (AP) — Splitting the bill for those pizzas you shared with your buddies or that utility bill that is suddenly due is going to get easier and faster even if you don't all use the same bank. JPMorgan Chase, Wells Fargo and other big banks are upgrading their online payment services to let customers make instant transfers of money to others who bank elsewhere, often at no cost. The move comes as traditional banks face pressure from payment companies like Venmo and Square Cash that offer ways to split the bill. Banks developed online services that allow their customers to send money to anyone with a phone number or email address several years ago. But the services were considered overly complicated.

  • Cerner touts hiring, new buildings, investment in research, development

    Updated: Fri, May 27, 2016

    Cerner Corp. executives are getting “tremendous input” from Neal Patterson, the patient, as well as Neal Patterson, the co-founder, stockholders heard Friday morning at the Kansas City-based company’s annual meeting. Patterson missed his usual role to preside over the meeting, but co-founder Cliff Illig told attendees that Patterson remains involved with the senior management team and that he’s providing “great insight from his experience.” Cerner has an economic impact of at least $1.2 billion on the local area, executives said The health care information technology company employs 11,500 in the metro area and expects local employment to grow to 25,000 when its new south Kansas City campus is completed.




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